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Full text of "Richard Frotscher's almanac and garden manual for the southern states"

Historic, archived document 

Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific l<nowledge, policies, or practices 



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drelGK * fildeMcar IN 



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SOUTHERN STATES. 



IDESIGISrED 



To GIVE Directions for the Cultivation of Vegetables, as 
Practiced in the South. 



Entered according to Act of Congress by Richard Fkotscher, in the Office of the Librarian 
at Washington, in the year 1877. 



WAREHOUSI 



15 & 17 DU MAINE STREET, 



tTLTLr 



NEAR THE FRENCH MARKET, 




^Mse 



-♦••e 



GEO. Ml'iLLKi;, I'PaNTEK, .50 BIKNVILLK ST., N. O. 



isay. 

IJlJTJTJTJTJTJTJlJTJTJTJXriJTXLJTJT^^ 



nnsuuxnjuim 



INTRODUCTION. 



The cultivation of vegetables for sale grows annually in impor- 
tance in the South, improved cars and rapid transit giving our far- 
mers the advantage of distant markets, increasing both the demand 
for "garden truck" and the profit on its cultivation. 

This has added to the interest felt in the questions, "what to 
cultivate?" and "how to doit?" — and in this Almanac and Garden 
Manual I have carefully considered these points in all their bear- 
ings, and have given directions as to the proper time and methods 
of cultivating vegetables in the South. 

The acknowledgments received for my Almanac and Garden 
Manual in the past from all parts of the South, and the success met 
by those who have followed the directions therein, attest the merits 
of the publication, and are to me gratifying evidences of the most 
satisfactory results. 

Quietly, and without ostentation, I have pursued my busi- 
ness, aiming by integrity, promptness and strict attention to the 
interest of my patrons, to merit their confidence and the good will of 
the community in general; while the very liberal and constantly in- 
creasing patronage received, is a practical and pleasant proof that I 
have succeeded. 

Assuring my patrons that their continued favors will be duly 
appreciated, and that no effort will be spared to make this publi- 
cation annually of more benefit and assistance to the gardeners of 
the South, 

I am, 

yours truly, 

RICHARD FROTSCHER. 



Richard Frotsclier's Almanac and Garden 3fanual 



SEEDS BY MAIL. 



Seeds can be sent by mail to any part of the United States in 
packages not exceeding four pounds, at sixteen cents per pound, or 
one cent per ounce, or fraction tliereof. On seeds ordered in papers 
or by the ounce I prepay the postage, except on peas, beans and corn. 
This^ refers to large sized papers which are sold at one dollar per dozen. 
When ordered by the pound sixteen cents per pound postage has to 
be added to the price of the seeds ; to peas, beans and corn, thirty 
cents per quart. 

All packages are put up in the most careful manner, and every 
precaution taken to insure their reaching their destination in safety. 
Purchasers living at any place where my seeds are not sold, are re- 
quested to write to me to obtain their supplies. This will be more 
profitable than to bu}" from country stores where seeds, left on com- 
mission, are often kept till all power of germination is destroyed. As 
seed merchants, who give out their goods on commission, rarely col- 
lect what is not sold, oftener than once every twelve or eighteen 
months, and as Lettuce, Spinach, Parsnip, Carrots, and many other 
seeds will either not sprout at all or grow imperfectly^ if kept over a 
summer in the South — to buy and plant such, is but money, time and 
labor wasted. 

Here in our climate, where we plant garden vegetables as freely 
in autumn as in spring, and where often the seed have to be put in 
the ground when the weather is very warm, it is an indispensable 
necessity to have perfectly fresh seeds. 

My arrangements with my growers are made so that I receive the 
new crop, expressly cleaned for me, as soon as it is matured. The 
varieties which are not raised in the North, I order from Europe, and 
have them shipped so as to reach me about the beginning of August, 
just the time they are needed for fall planting. By following this 
plan I have always a fall supply of fresh seeds of undoubted germi- 
nating ciualities, while dealers, who sell on commission, have only those 
left from the winter previous. 

On the receipt of one dollar I will mail thirteen large size papers 
of seeds, put up the same as seeds sold by the pound. These papers 
can be selected from this Catalogue, and include four papers of either 
Beans or Peas, if so Avanted. Or, for the same amount, I will mail 
twenty smaller papers, including four papers of either Peas or Beans. 
This is done to enable consumers to get reliable seeds in good size 
papers in places where my seeds are not sold. The papers put up by 
Northern seedsmen are so small that of some varieties they hardly 
contain enough to do any good. The low prices charged to merchants 
are made at the expense of consumers. My papers are large and worth 
the full value of the money paid for them. 

It cannot be too well impressed on the minds of all cultivators of 
vegetables, that seeds kept through a summer in this climate will not 
groic, and that all who use sueh seeds will be losers. 

All seeds that leave my establishment are thoroughly tested. ' 

Having received a great many complaints that letters which were 
addressed to me and contained 'money, were not answered, I must 
state that these letters never reached me, and, therefore, would caution 
my customers not to send any money in letters without registering- 
same. By sending one dollar, "or upwards, the cost, ten cents, can be 
charged to me. The cheapest and surest way is money order or draft, 
but where they cannot be had, letters Imve to be registered, which can 
be done at any Post Office. 



For the Southern States. 



A Few Remarks oq Raising Vegetables for Shipping. 



Within the past few 5 ears the raising of early vegetables for ship- 
ping West, has become quite an item in the -neighborhood of New 
Orleans. We have advantages here, which are not found elsewhere, 
for that branch of industry. Freights have been reduced to all points 
from here, and special cars, built expressly for carrying green vege- 
tables and fruit, have been put on the Kailroads, We are earlier here 
than at any other point, and with the rich ground we have, and the 
large supply of manure to be had for the hauling only, early vege- 
tables can be raised very successfully. 

Almost every kind of vegetables are shipped from here, but Beans, 
Cucumbers, Beets, Tomatoes, Cabbage and Peas form the bulk of 
shipment. For Beans, the Dwarf Wax, Improved Valentine and 
"Best of AH" are principally planted for shipping purposes ; the latter 
carry well and find ready sale. The Wax varieties do well in a dry 
season, but in a wet one they are apt to spot, which makes them unfit 
for shipping. If they have had a good season to grow, so they arrive 
in good order at destination, they will sell higher than any other 
variety. The— Crease Back — a Pole Bean, is well adapted for shipping. 
It is very early and \yill follow the r)warf Beans closely in maturing. 

Thousands of bushels of green pods are shipped from here to the 

Western markets. They are generally stenciled "Mobile Beans," 
which name is wrongly applied. Very few of this variety are planted 
at that place. 

In the way of Cucumbers, the improved White Spine and New- 
Orleans Market are the best varieties, as they bear abundantly, keep 
their color better, and are superior for shipping to any other. I 
liave been supplying the largest growers in that line with seed, the 
stock of which cannot be surpassed in quality. Of Beets only the 
dark red Blood Turnip or the Egyptian should be planted for shipping 
purposes. The Egyptian is a very (luick growing variety, and should 
not be sown quite so early as tlie Blood Turnip, which ought to be 
sown in September and October; for tlie former variety, January is 
time enough. 

For Tomatoes, the Extra Early Dwarf comes in bearing lirst, but 
should be planted only for the first crop, as when large varieties come 
in the market, the former do not sell as well. Great improvements 
have been made of late years in Tomatoes ; the varieties raised and in- 
troduced by Livingston's Sons, are perfect, and hardly any improve- 
ment can be made on such varieties as the Paragon and Favorite. 
New Orleans is not a good point to ship Tomatoes from, as they hardly 
ever arrive at destination in good condition. Along the Jackson B. E. , 
where the land is more sandy, a better article is raised for shipping. 
Lettuce is shipped quite extensively ; the Improved Passion i,s used 
principally for that purpose. 

Potatoes and Onions are shipped in large quantities, but the for- 
mer are very uncertain in regard to prices. Late shipped Onions 
generally pay better than those shipped too early. The market often 
gets overstocked with vegetables, but never in the spring as long as 



6 Richard Frotscker's Almanac and Garden Manual 

they are fit for shipping; the planting at that time is more remune- 
rative than at any other. 

There is a broad field yet to growers of vegetables for shipping. 

The past season has been a good one for shippers. Cabbages did 
not pay. Except the first shipped, the crop for shipping came in too 
late, owing to the severe freeze in January. When the weather gets 
hot, cabbage does not carry well. Beets, Onions, Peas, Early Potatoes 
and Cucumbers paid well ; Beans have done finely, the Valentine and 
Best of All carried in good condition. The Wax Beans did not arrive 
in such good order, except in rare cases. Tomatoes paid. 

Gardeners and others who contemplate raising vegetables for ship- 
ping, are invited to give me a call. From the fact that all staple 
articles are raised for me by contract, in such sections best suited to 
mature the varieties w^e need for our climate, and the interest I take 
in the seed" business, coupled with the thorough knowledge of 
same, enables me to assist in making selections of seeds for the pur- 
pose. The interest of my customers and mine are identical. My 
stock is the best selected and largest in the South. 

The following is a copy of a letter from Major A. W. Kountree, 
who is one of the largest and most successful Cabbage growers in this 
State. 

Orange (trove, 
Jefferson Parish, October 24, 1885. 
Mr. E. Frotscher, New Orleans, La. 

Dear Sir ;— In answer to your request, that I should give you my 
views and experience in Cabbage culture, I can only say that, w^hile I 
cheerfully give you the benefit of my experience— hoping it may help 
to give light on the subject— I think there are many growers better 
qualified, from longer experience, to speak on the subject. 

Cabbage has become one of the leading articles of vegetable diet, 
and at almost all seasons of the year is in constant supply. In the 
spring and early summer car loads of Cabbage are to be seen daily on 
all the railroads from the South going to all northern cities to supply 
the demand. And, again, in the latter part of the summer and fall sea- 
sons it is reversed, and thousands of car loads are sent from the 
northern States to supply the South. It is a very much larger business 
than the mass of the people have any idea of, giving employment to 
thousands of people, and many dollars of capital. 

To make a success of Cabbage growing for shipment at long dis- 
tances, it requires high culture to bring it to perfection. My mode of 
culture is to plow under a crop of Cow Peas, or some other green 
crop, several weeks before the time for setting out the plants. The 
ground should be replowed and well manured before the planting- 
takes place. Stable manure or some good fertilizer used freely, will 
insure good, solid heads. Get good seed of some good, approved variety 
that succeeds well in your neighborhood. Let the ground be well 
drained and stir it often, and you will get good results ; but, if the 
work is carelessly done, you will certainly fail, and then complain of 
bad seed. In j^acking for shipment open crates are used, and the 
loose leaves should be removed, excepting about one circle to act as 
a sort of an envelope for the head. 

I have tried many varieties of Cabbage, and found several kinds 
to do very well; but all things considered, the Flat Dutch for a win- 
ter crop, and the Genuine German Brunswick for early spring, are 
generally preferred by market gardeners. The Excelsior Flat Dutch 
can be sown in December, and will make a good spring crop. The 
Early Summer is not so large, but in a favorable season makes nice 
heads. 

Yours truly, 

A. W. EOUNTREE. 



For the Southern States. 



1st Month. 



JANUARY. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for tlc\e Latitude of tl:\e Southern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 2d. 7h. 

Full Moon 19d. 5h. 

Last Quarter 16d. lOh. 

New Moon 23d. 9h. 



00m. Morning. 

12m. Evening. 

2m. Morning, 

41m. Evening. 



DAY 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Mouth &Week 


h. m, 


li, m 



Moon 

r. & s. 



CHRONOLOGY 

— OF — 

JMI'O n TA M EJ -EN TS. 



I 7 9 I 4 51 111 37 I Union of Ireland with Great Britnin, 



1 I Sat. 



1801. 



1) Sunday after New Year. 



Matth. 2. 



Day's length, 9h. 42m. 



2 


Sun. 


7 8 


4 52 


morn 


3 


Mon. 


7 8 


4 52 


12 35 


4 


Tnes. 


7 8 


4 52 


1 30 


5 


Wed. 


7 7 


4 53 


2 20 


6 


Thurs. 


7 7 


4 53 


3 18 


7 


Frid. 


7 7 


4 53 


4 17 


8 


Sat. 


7 6 


4 54 


5 16 



Gen. Wolf born, Westerham, Kent, 1727. 

Eliot Warbarton, Hist. Novelist, died, 1852. 

lutrodu'n Silk inanut'es into Europe, 1536. 

Vigil of Epiphany. 

Epiphany, or 12th day, old Christmas Day. 

Kobert Nicoll, poet, born, 1814. 

Bat. N. O., 1815 & Inaug. Gov. Nicholls, '77. 



9 


Sun. 


7 6 


4 54 


rises 


10 


Mon, 


7 6 


4 54 


6 18 


11 


Cues, 


7 5 


4 55 


7 28 


12 


Wed. 


7 4 


4 56 


8 39 


13 


rhnrs. 


7 3 


4 57 


9 48 


14 


L^rid. 


7 3 


4 57 


10 55 


15 


^at. 


7 2 


4 58 


11 59 



2) 1st Sunday after Epiphany, Luke 2. Day's length, 9h. 48m. 



Car. Lucr. Herschel, Astrono'r, died, 1848. 
1st Steamb't New Orleans fr. Pittsburg, '12. 
First Lottery drawn iu England, 1569. 
St. Arcadius, Martyr. 

G. Fox, Founder Sect of Quakers.died, 1690. 
"Great Frost" in Engbrnd, began 1205. 
Thomas Crofton Croker born, 1798, 



3) 2nd Sunday after Epiphany. John 2, Day's length, 9h. 56m. 



Edmond Spencer, Poet, died, 1599. 
Mozart, Musician, born, 1756, 
Festival ot St. Peter's Chair at Kome. 
James Watt born, 1736. 
Coldest day in the century, 1838. 
St. Agues, Virgin Martyr, 304. 
Francis Bacon born, 1561. 



4) 3d Sunday after Epiphany. Matth, 8, Day's length, lOh. Om. 

Thanksgiving for victory of 8th, 1815. 

Frederick the Great born, 1712, 

St. Paul's Day. 

Louisiana seceded, 1861, 

Admiral Lord Hood died, 1816 

Henry VIII die 1 1547. 

Emanuel de Swedeuborg born, 1688-89. 

5) 4th Sunday after Epiphany, Matth. 8, Day's length, lOh, 18m, 



16 


Sun. 


7 1 


4 59 


morn 


17 


Mon. 


7 


5 


12 39 


18 


Tues. 


7 


5 


1 39 


19 


Wed. 


6 59 


5 1 


2 38 


20 


Thnrs. 


6 58 


5 2 


3 35 


21 


Frid. 


6 58 


5 2 


4 21 


22 


Sat. 


6 57 


5 3 


5 12 



23 


Sun. 


6 56 


5 4 


sets 


24 


Mon. 


6 56 


5 4 


6 11 


25 


rues. 


6 55 


5 5 


6 59 


26 


Wed. 


6 54 


5 6 


7 52 


27 


rhurs 


6 53 


5 7 


8 50 


28 


Frid. 


6 52 


5 8 


9 49 


29 


Sat. 


6 51 


5 9 


10 48 



30 ISaui. I 6 50 I 5 10 11 45 I King Charles I beheaded, 1649, 

31 I viou. I 6 50 I 5 10 morn I Ben. Johnston born, 1574. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5647.— 26. Rosh Hodesh Shebat. 



Richard Frotscher^s Almanac and Garden Manual 



cl ^lontli. 



FEBRUARY. 



S Dav 



Calculated for the X-atilude of tlie Soutl-^ern States. 



MOON'S PHASES.' 

First Quarter . . Id. 3li. 6m. Morning. 

Full Moon . 8d. ih. o6m. ET'ening. 

Last Quart-: - 14d. Sh. 12m. Morning. 

Xew Moon 22d. lli. 20m. Evening. 



DAT 

or 


Sim 
lises. 


Sun 

sets. 


onth iWeek 


Il ui. 


h. m. 


1 


Tnes. 


6 49 


5 11 


2 


Wed. 


6 49 


5 11 


3 


Tlitirs. 


6 4S 


5 12 


i 


Frid. 


6 47 


5 13 


5 i 


Sat i 


6 46 i 


5 14 



Moon 



11, m. 



CHRONOLOGY 

1 .1/ P < f 1 1 TA A 1 E 1 iA TS . 



12 2 I Washington elec. President, 1789. 

1 7 Puriiieation of the Blessed YiTgin. " Candle- 

2 8 Henry Cromwell l-orn, 1627. [mas Day. 

3 14 Delegates from Confederate States meet at 

4 20 Ole Bull bom, 1810. [Montgomery, Ala., '61. 



6 1 Septuagesima Sunday 



Matth. 20. 



Day's length, lOh. 2Sm. 



6 


Snii. 


6 45 


5 15 


5 20 


7 


Mob. 


6 44 


5 16 


G 14 


8 


Tue.s. 


643 


5 17 


rises 


9 


Wed. 


6 42 


5 18 


7 24 


10 


Thnrs. 


6 41 


5 19 


8 31 


11 


Frid. 


6 40 


5 20 


9 37 


12 


Sat. 


6 39 


21 


10 44 



Charles II, King of England, died, 1865. 

Charles Dickens bom, 1812. 

Mary, Qoeen of Scots, beheaded, 1587. 

David Kezzio murdered, 1565-661 " 

Kiot at Oxford, 1354. 

Mary, Queen of England, born, 1516. 

Abraham Lincoln bom. 1809. 



7\ Sexagesima Sunday 



Luke 8. 



Day's length. lOh. 42m. 



13 


Suu. 


6 38 


5 22 


11 49 


St. Gregory 11. Pope, 631. 


14 


Mon. 


6 37 


5 23 


morn 


St. Valentine's Dav. 


15 


Tnes. 


a 36 


5 24 


12 W 


Gidilei Galileo, AstroDomer. bom, 1564. 


16 


Wed. 


6 35 


5 25 


1 33 


Dr. Kane. Am. Arctic Explorer, 'died, 1857. 


17 


Thurs. 


6 34 


5 26 


.2 26 


Columbia, S. C. bnrned. 1865. 


18 


Frid. 


6 33 


5 27 


3 10 


Pope Giegorv Y. died. 999. 


19 


Sftt 


6 32 


5 28 


4 4 


Eliz. Carter, classical scholar, died 1806. 



S) Quinquagesima Sunday. Luke 18. Day's length, loh. 56m, 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 



Snn. 


6 31 


5-29 


Mon. 


6 30 


5 30 


Tnes. 


6 29 


5 31 


Wed. 


6 28 


5 32 


Thurs. 


6 27 


5 33 


Frid. 


6 26 


5 34 


Sat. 


6 25 


5 35 



4 46 I U. Gaghan &T. Connor, felon poets, hanged 

5 30 P'ierre du Bose born, 1623. 
sets Mardi Gras iu Xew Orleans. 

6 46 Battle of Buena Yista, 1847. 

7 48 St. Matthias. Apostle. 

8 41 Dr. Bucan bom. 1729. 

9 39 I Thomjis Moore, poet, died, 1852. 



9i 


1st Sunday ] 


n Lent. 




Matth. 4. 


Day's length 


llh. 


10m. 1 


27 

28 


Sun. 6 24 

Mou. } 6 23 


5 36 
5 37 


10 
11 


31 j 
20 


Longfellow 
Humphrey, 


born, 1807. 

Duke of Gloucester, 


i 
murdered. 




Jewish Festiyals and Fasts 


.— 56i7.— 24, 


25. Eosh Codesh 


Adar 





For the Southern States. 



:UI Mouth. 



MARCH 



31 Days 



Calculated for tl^e Latitude of tl^e Soutl-\err\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 2cl. . 7h. 

Full Moon ... 9d. 3h. 

Last Quarter IGd. ' 8h. 

New Moon .■ 2id. ' lOh. 



47m. Evening-. 
13m. Afternoon. 
22m. Morning;. 
49m. Morning, 



Montli &Week 



Sun 
vises. 



Sun 

sets. 



Moou 
r. & s. 



CHRONOLOGY 

—OF — 

I, Ml' <) n TA N L K I KN J S. 



1 


Tues. 


G 21 


5 38 


morn 


2 


Wed. 


G 21 


5 39 


12 30 


8 


rhnrs. 


6 2J 


5 40 


1 45 


4 


Frid. 


6 18 


5 42 


2 15 


5 


Sat. 


G 17 


5 43 


3 9 



1st No. of the Spectator published, 1711. 
Territoiy of Dakota organized, IBGI. 
Eduiond Waller, Poet, born, 16<i5. 
Abrahaio Lincohi inaugurated, 1861. i . 
1st Locomotive runthrougli Brit. lube. 1830. 



10) 2d Sunday in Lent. 



Matth 15. 



Day's length, 11 h. 26m. 



6 


8uii. 


•!!6 16 


5 44 


4 2 


7 


Mon. 


6 15 


5 45 


4 54 


8 


Tues. 


6 14 


5 46 


5 33 


9 


Wed. 


6 13 


5 47 


rises 


10 


Thurs. 


6 11 


5 49 


7 14 


11 


Frid. 


6 10 


5 50 


8 23 


12 


Sat. 


6 9 


5 51 


9 35 



Great financial excitement, 1863, 

Blanchard, Aeronaut, died, 1809., . 

King William III, of England, died, 1702. 

William Cobbett born, 1762, 

The Forty Martyrs of St. Sebaste, 320. 

1st daily paper, "Daily-Courant," Br., 1702. 

St. Gregory the Great, Pope,' 604. 



11) 3d Sunday in Lent. 



Luke 11. 



Day's Ipngth,' iTh. 48m. 



13 


Sun. 


6 8 


5 52 


10 44 


14 


Mon. 


6 7 


5 53 


11 51 


15 


Tue.s. 


6 6 


5 54 


morn 


16 


Wed. 


G 5 


5 55 


12 28 


17 


Thurs. 


6 3 


5 57 


1 14 


18 


Frid. 


6 2 


5 58 


2 2 


19 


Silt. 


6 1 


5 59 


2 49 



Discovery of planet Uranus, by Herschel, 
Andrew Jackson born, 1767. [1781. 

Julius Ca3sar assassinated, B. C, 44. 
Prince Hohenlohe's miraculous cures, 1823. 
St. Patrick, Apostle of Irelanrl. 
Edward, King and Martyr, 978. 
St. Joseph's day. 



12) 4tli Sunday in Lent. 



John 6. 



Day's length, llh. 58m. 



20 


Sun. 


6 


.6 


3 35 


21 


Mon. . 


5 59 


6 1 


4 13 


22 


Tues. 


5 58 


G 2 


4 58 


23 


Wed. 


5 57 


6- 3 


,5 28 


24 


rhurs. 


5 56 


6 4 


sets 


25 


Frid, 


5 54 


G 6 


7 22 


26 


Sat. 


5 53 


6- 7 


8 16 



Vesta discovered, 1807. 

Loui.siana ceded to France, 1800. 

J. W. von Goethe, Germ. Poet, died, 1832. 

Peter the Cruel, King of. Castile, died, 1369 

Mahomet II born, y:30. 

^Annunciation of the blessed Virgin IVLiry. 

Gov. Winthrop died, 1640: 



13) 5th Sunday in Lent. 



John 8. 



Day's length, 12h. 14m. 



27 


Sun. 


5 52 


G 8 


9 17 


28 


Mon. 


5 51 


6 9 


10 12 


29 


Tues. 


5 50 


6 10 


11 10 


30 


Wed. 


5 49 


6 11 


11 50 


31 


rhurs. 


5 48 


6 12 


morn 



Vera Cruz captured, 1847. 
Planet Pallas discovered. 1802. 
Mrs. Fitzherbert died, 1837. 
Dr. William Hunter died, 1783. 
Beethoven died, 1827. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. — 5647.— 9. Zom Esther. 10. Purim. 
26. Rosh Codesh Nissan and Parshot Hochodesh. 



10 


Rid 


lard Frotscher 


•'s Almanac and Garden Manual 




4th Month. 




APRIL. 


% 


30 


Days. 




Galcu 


lated for tl\e 


Latitude of tl\e 


Southern 


States. 





MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter Id. 8h. 

Full Moon 8d. 12h. 

Last Quarter 14d. lUh. 

New MooH 23d. 3h. 

First Quarter 3Cd. 5h. 



32m. Morning. 
19in. Morning. 
43in. Evening. 
32m. Morning. 
41m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month &Week 


Sun 
rises. 

h. m. 


Sun 

sets. 

h. m. 


Moon 
r. & s. 

h m. 


CHRONOLOGY 

—OF - 

J M r o n TA ^ r k vEy rs. 


1 
2 


Fril. 

Sat. 


5 47 
5 46 


6 13 
6 14 


12 46 
1 40 


Enrthquake at Melbourne, 1871. 
Jeffer.sou lioni, 1743. 


14) Palm Sunday. Matth. 21. Day's length, 12h. 38m. 



3 


Sliifl. 


5 45 


6 15 


2 36 


4 


Mon. 


5 43 


6 17 


3 35 





L^ies. 


5 42 


6 18 


4 19 


6 


Wed. 


5 41 


6 19 


4 50 


7 


rhnrs. 


5 40 


6 20 


5 13 


8 


Frid. 


5 39 


6 21 


rises 


9 


6at. 


5 38 


6 22 


7 41 



Palm Sunday. 

Oliver Goldsmith died, 1774. 

St. Iigernach, of Ireland, 550. 

Battle of Sliiloh, 1862. 

St. Francis Xavier, Missionary, born, 1506. 

Louisiana admitted to the Union, 1812. 

Gen. R. E. Lee surrendered, 1865. 



15) Easter Sunday. 



Mark 16. 



Day's length, 12h. 44m. 



10 


Sun. 


5 37 


6 23 


8 36 


11 


Mon. 


5 36 


6 24 


9 32 


12 


Tue.s. 


5 35 


6 25 


10 24 


13 


Wed. 


5 34 


6 26 


11 18 


14 


Tburs. 


5 33 


6 27 


morn 


15 


Frid. 


5 32 


6 28 


12 13 


16 


Sat. 


5 31 


6 29 


1 3 



Easter Sunday. 

Geo. Canning born, 1770. 

First gnu of Civil War fired, 1861, at Fort 

Sydney Lady Morgan died, 1859. [Sumter. 

Lincoln assassinated, 1865. 

Geo. Culvert, Lord Baltimore, died, 1632. 

Battle of Culloden, 1746. 



16) 1st Sunday after Easter. John 20. Day's length, 12h. 58m. 



Dr. Benjamin Franklin died, 1790. 

Shakespeare born, 1564. 

Battle of Lexington, 1775. 

E. Barton, "Maid i f Kent," executed. 1534. 

Confed. victory at Plymouth, N. C, 1863. 

Madam De Stael botn 1766. 

Shakespeare died, 1616. 



17 


Sun. 


5 30 


6 30 


1 43 


18 


Mon. 


5 29 


'6 31 


2 19 


19 


Tues. 


5 28 


6 32 


3 2 


20 


Wed. 


5 27 


6 33 


3 33 


21 


Thurs 


5 26 


6 34 


4 19 


22 


Frid. 


5 25 


6 35 


4 47 


23 


Sat. 


5 24 


6 36 


sets 



17) 2d Sunday after Easter. 



John 10. 



Day's length, 13h. 12m. 



24 


Sun. 


5 23 


6 37 


7 59 


25 


Mon. 


5 22 


6 38 


9 4 


26 


Tues. 


5 21 


6 39 


10 


27 


Wed. 


5 20 


6 40 


11 


28 


Thurs. 


5 19 


6 41 


11 55 


29 


Frid. 


5 18 


6 42 


morn 


30 


Sat. 


5 17 


6 43 


12 42 



Oliver Cromwell born, 1599. 

St. Mark's Day. 

David Hnme born, 1711. 

Sir Wm. Jones, Poet and Scholar, died, 1794. 

Monroe born. 1758. 

King Edward IV, of England, born. 1441. 

Louisiana purchased from France by U. S. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5647. — April 2. Schabbath Hagodol. 9. and 

10. First days of Pessach. 15. and 16. Last days of Pessach. 

24. and 25. Posh Codesh lyar. 



For the Southern States. 



11 



5tli Month. 



MAY. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of the Soutl\eri\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Full Moon 7d. 8h. 

Last Quarter 14d. 2h. 

New Moon 22d. 5h. 

First Quarter 29d. llh. 



41m. Morning, 
53m. Evening. 
45m. Evening. 
49m. Evening. 



DAY 

Month &Week 



Sun 

rises. 

h. m. 



Sun 

sets. 

h. m. 



Moon 

r. &s. 

h. m 



CHRONOLOGY 

— OF — 

IMrOliTAJST El' EN IS. 



18) 3d Sunday after Easter. John 16. Day's length, 13h. 28ra. 

St. Philip and St. James, Apostles. 

William Camden born, 1551. 

Discovery of the Holy Cross, by St. Helena. 

Dr. Isaac Barrow, Eng. divine, died, 1677. 

Emperor Justinian born, 482. 

Humboldt died, 1859. 

St. Benedict II, Pope, Confessor, 686. 

19) 4th Sunday after Easter. John 16. Day's length, 13h. 40m. 



1 


Sun. 


5 16 


6 44 


1 32 


2 


yion. 


5 15 


6 45 


2 28 


3 


Tues. 


5 14 


6 46 


2 56 


4 


Wed. 


5 14 


6 46 


3 52 


5 


rhurs. 


5 13 


6 47 


4 32 


6 


Frid. 


5 12 


6 48 


5 2 


7 


Sat. 


5 11 


6 49 


rises 



8 


8uii. 


5 10 


6 50 


8 10 


9 


Mon. 


5 10 


6 50 


9 7 


10 


rues. 


5 9 


6 51 


10 


11 


Wed. 


5 8 


6 52 


10 43 


12 


Thurs. 


5 7 


6 53 


11 28 


13 


Frid. 


5 6 


6 54 


morn 


14 


Sat. 


5 5 


6 55 


12 20 



Stonewall Jackson died 1863. 
Battle of Spottsylvania, 1864. 
Pacific Kailroad finished, 1869. 
Madame Ricamire died, 1849. 
St. Pancras, Martyr, 304. 
Jamestown, Va., settled, 1607. 
Battle of Crown Point, 1575. 



20) 


5th Sunday after Easter 


John 16. Day's length, 13h. 


50 m. 


15 


Sun. 


5 5 


6 55 


12 55 


St. Isidore died, 1170. 




16 


Mon. 


5 4 


6 56 


1 31 


Sir William Petty born, 1623. 




17 


rues. 


5 3 


6 57 


2 2 


J. Jay died, 1829. 




18 


Wed. 


5 2 


6 58 


2 53 


Napoleon I elected Emperor, 1804. 




19 


rhurs. 


5 2 


6 58 


3 24 


Ascension Day. 




20 


Frid. 


5 1 


6 59 


3 57 


Hawthorn died, 1864. 




21 


S<it. 


5 1 


6 59 


4 33 


Columbus died, 1506. 





21) 6th Sunday after Easter. John 15. Day's length, 14h. Om. 



22 


Sun. 


5 


7 


sets 


Title of Baronet first coaferred, 1611. 


23 


Mon. 


4 59 


7 1 


7 58 


Napoleon I crowned King of Italy, 1805. 


24 


Tues. 


4 58 


7 2 


8 48 


Bishop Jewell born, 1522. 


25 


Wed. 


4 58 


7 2 


9 43 


Buttle of Winchester, 1864. 


26 


rhurs 


4 57 


7 3 


10 35 


Fort Erie captured, 1813. 


27 


Frid. 


4 57 


7 3 


11 33 


Dante, poet, born, 1265. 


28 


Sat. 


4 56 


7 4 


morn 


Noah Webster died, 1843. 



22) Whitsunday. 



John 14. 



Day's length, 14h. 8m, 



Sun. 


4 56 


7 4 


12 59 


Men. 


4 55 


7 5 


1 32 


Tues. 


4 55 


7 5 


2 5 



Paris, burned, 1871. 

Peter the Great of Russia born, 

Joan of Arc, burned, 1431. 



1672. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. —5647. —May 12. Lag Beomor. 24. Kosh 
Codesh Siwan. 29. 30. Shebuoth. 



12 



Richard Frotschei^'s Almanac and Garden Manual 



(3 til Mouth. 



JUNE, 



30 Davs. 



Calculated, for lt»e Latitude of the Soutlierr\ States. 

MOOX'S PHASES. 

Full Atoon 5d. oh. 18m. ETening:. 

Last Quarter 13d. Sh. 14m. Morning. 

XewMoon... 21d. 5h. 32m. ^Morning. 

First Quarter 2Sd. ih. 41m. Morning. 



DAY ' ^im 

Month SrWeeki h. m. 



Sun 

sets. 

li. ni. 



Moon 
r. & s. 

h.. m. 



CHROXOLCGY 

— OF — 

J -li /' O n TA .\ T E \ E\ TS. 



1 


Wed. 


4 54 


7 6 


2 


Thurs 


4 54 


7 6 


3 


Frid. 


4 53 


7 7 ' 


4 


Sat. 


4 53 


' ' 



2 35 t Battle of Seven Pines. 1862. 

3 2 I Battle of Cold Harbor. 1864. 

3 46 ' S. A. Dougl^.s died, 1861. 

4 10 Lord E. Dudley marrd A. Iv bsart. 1550. 



23' Trinity Sundav. 



John 3. 



Day's length, 14h. 16m. 



5 


Sun. 


4 52 


7 8 


rises 


6 


Mon. 


4 52 


7 8 


8 2 


7 


Tne.s. 


4 51 


7 9 


9 


8 


Wed. 


4 51 


7 9 


9 42 


9 


Thurs. 


4 51 


7 9 


10 12 





Frid. 


4 51 


7 9 


11 


.1 


Sat. 


4 50 


7 10 


1137 



J. Pradier, Sculptor, died, 1852. 
Surrender of Memphis, Tenu., 1862. " ■ 
First American Con<i;ress at X«-w York. 1765. 

Emperor Xero died, 68, Eome 

Corpus Christi. 

Battle of Big Bethel. 1861. . 

Sir John Fianklin rlied. 1847. 



24) 1st Sunday after Trinity 



Luke 16. 



Day's length. 14h. 20m. 



12 


Suu. 


4 50 


7 10 


morn 


13 


Mon. 


4 50 


7 10 


12 19 


14 


Tues. 


4 50 


7 10 


12 59 


15 


Wed. 


4 50 


7 10 


1 33 


16 


Thurs. 


4 50 


7 10 


2 26 . 


17 


Frid. 


4 50 


7 10 


•2 49 


18 


Sat. 


4 49 


7 11 


3 53 



Harriet Martineau, Novelist, horn, 1802. 

General Scott born. 1786. 

St. Basil the Gieat. 379. 

Magna Charter. 1215. 

Edward I, of England, born. 1239. 

Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775. 

War declared against Great Britain. 1812. 



25 1 2d Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 14. 



Day's length, 14li. 21m. 



19 


Sun. 


4 49 


7 11 


4 16 , 


20 


Mon. 


4 49 


7 11 


4 47 


21 


Tues. 


4 48 


7 12 


•sets. 


22 


Wed. 


4 49:: 


.7 11 


8 23 


23 


Thurs. 


4 49 


7 11 


9 9 


24 


Frid. 


4 49 


7 11 


10 0- 


25 


Sat. 


4 50 


7 10 


10 35 



Kearsage sunk the Alabama, 1864 
St. Silverius, Pope and Martyr, 538. 
Anthony Collins boin, 1676. 
Napoleon I abdicated 1815. 
Battle of S->lfe-riuo. 1859. 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist. 
Battle of Bannochburn. 



26j 3d Sunday after Trinity. Luke 15. 



Day's length, 14h. 20m." 



26 


Sun. 


4 50 


7 10 


11 16 


07 


Mon. 


4 50 


7 10 


11 49 


2S 


Cues. 


4 50 


7 10 


morn 


29 


Wed. 


4 50 


7 10 


12 49 


30 


Thurs. 


4 50 


^ 7 10 


1 37 



Dr. Philip Doddiige born. 1702. 
John Murray. Publisher, died, 1843. 
Queen Victoria crowned. 1838. 
St. Peter the Apostle. 68. 
Bishop Gavin Dunbar died, 1547. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. — 5647.— June 22. and 23. 
Rosh Codesh Tamus. 



For the Soutliern States. 



13 



th Month, 



JULY. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for tl:\e Latitude of t]:\e Southern States. 

MOON'S PHASES. 

Fall Moon Sd. 3h . 14m. Morning. 

Last Quarter 13d. Ih. 37in. Morning. 

New Moon 20d. 3h. 30m. Afternoon. 

First Quarter .. 27d. 9h. 10m. Morning! 



DAY 

OF 

Month &Week 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


rises. 


sets. . 


r. & s. 


h. ni. 


li. m. 


h m. 



CHRONOLOGY 

— OF - 

IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



Frid. 

Sat. 



4 50 
4 51 



7 10 

7 9 



2 5 
2 45 



Battle of Malvern Hill, 1862. 
Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 



27) 4th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 6. Day's length, 14h. 18m. 

Quebec founded, 1608. 
Independence of the United States, 1776. 
Queen Magdalen of Scotland died, 1537., 
Th, More, Chancel, of Eng. beheaded, 1535. 
Dr. Th. Blacklock, "the blind poet," died, 
John do la Fontaine born, 1621. ' ^1791. 
Zachary Taylor died, 1850. 



3 


Sun. 


4 51 


7 


9 


3 23 


4 


Mon. 


4 51 


7 


9 


4 9 


5 


Tues. 


4 51 


7 


9 


rises 


6 


Wed. 


4 52 


7 


8 


8 21 


7 


Thurs. 


4 52 


7 


8 


9 1 


8 


Frid. 


4 52 


7 


8 


9 40 


9 


Sat, 


4 53 


7 


7 


10 20 



28) 5th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 5. 



Day's lepgth, 14h. 14m, 



10 


Sun. 


4 53 


7 7 


10 40 


11 


Mon. 


4 54 


7 6 


11 9 


12. 


Tues, 


4 54 


7 6. 


11 40 


13 


Wed. 


4 55 


7 5 


morn 


14 


Thurs. 


4 56 


7 4 


12 16 


15 


Frid. ■ 


4 56 


7 4 


12 54 


16 


Sat. 


4 57 . 


7 3 


1 26 



John Calvin, theologian, born 1509. 

J. Q. Adams born, 1767. 

Robt. Stevenson, engineer, etc., died, 1850, 

Dog days begin. 

John Hunter, eminent surgeon, born, 1728. 

St. Swithin's da3^ 

Great riot in New York city, 1863. 



29) 6th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 5. Day's length, 14h, 06m. 



Dr. Isaac Watts born, 1647. 

St. Symphorosia and 7 sons. Martyrs, 120. 

St, Vincent de Paul, confessor, 1660. 

Confed. Congress at Richmond, 1861. 

Battle of Bull Run, 1861. 

Urania discovered, 1824. 

First Olympiad, 776, B, C. 



17 


Snn. 


4 57 


7 3 


2 3 


18 


Mon. 


4 58 


7 2 


2 30 


19 


Tries. 


4 59 


7 Iv 


3 37 


20 


Wed, 


4 59 


7 1 


sets 


21 


Thurs 


5 


7 


7 58 


22 


Frid. 


5 1 


6 59 


8 47 


23 


Sat. 


5 1 


6 59 


9 20 



30) 7th Sunday after Trinity. 



Mark 8. Day's length, 13h. 56m. 



24 


Sun. 


5 2 


6 58 


9. 49 


25 


Mon. 


5 2 


6 58 


10 43 


26- 


Tiies. 


5 3- 


6 57 


11 12 


27 


Wed. 


5 4 


6 56 


11 48 


28 


Thurs. 


5 4 


6 56 


morn 


29 


Frid. 


5 5 


6 55 


12 42 


30 


Sat. 


5 6 


6 54 


1 39 



Curran born, 1750. 

St. James the Great. 

Flood' at Pittsburg, 1874. 

Atlantic cable laid, 1866. 

Battle before Atlanta. Ga. , 1864. 

Albert I, Emp. of Germany, born. 1280. 

Westfield Explosion, N. Y. Harbor, 1871. 



31) 8th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 7,. Day's length, 13h, 46m. 
31 ISurt. I 5 7 I 6 5 I 2 36 I St. Ignatius Loyola died, 1556. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts,— 5647.— 22. Ptosh Codesh Ab 31, Tisho beab 



14 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



8th Month. 



AUGUST. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tl\e Soutl^ern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Full Moon 3d. 8h. 2()m. Evening. 

Last Quarter lid. 6h. 16m. Evening. 

New Moon 19d. 12h. 18m. Morning. 

First Quarter .. 25d. Sli. Im. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month &Week 



Sun 
rises. 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
r. & s. 


h. m, 


h. na. 


h, m, 



CHRONOLOGY 

—OF — 
IMPOnTAi\ T ErEi\TS. 



1 


Mon. 


5 7 


6 53 


3 22 


2 


rues. 


5 8 


6 52 


4 18 


3 


Wed. 


5 9 


6 51 


rises 


4 


rhurs. 


5 10 


6 50 


7 16 


5 


Frid. 


5 11 


6 49 


7 49 


6 


Sat. 


5 12 


6 48 


8 21 



Harriet Lee, Novelist, died, 1851. 
Mehemed Ali, Pasha of Egypt, died, 1849. 
Crown Point taken, 1759. 
John B.mim, Irish Novelist, died, 1842. 
First Atlantic fable lauded, 1858. 
Transfiguration of our Lord. 



7 


§UI1. 


5 13 


6 47 


8 53 


8 


Mon. 


5 14 


6 46 


9 32 


9 


Tues. 


5 15 


6 45 


10 3 


10 


Wed. 


5 16 


6 44 


10 43 


11 


Thurs. 


5 17 


6 43 


11 39 


12 


Frid. 


5 18 


6 42 


morn 


13 


8at. 


5 19 


6 41 


12 24 



32) 9th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 16. Day's length, 13h. 34m. 



Leonidas, Spartan Heio, shiin 480, B. C. 
Fr. Hutcheson Moral Phil., born, 1694. 
Issac Walton born, 1593. 
Battle of Weisenburg, 1870. 
Viscount Rowland Hill born, 1772 
Pope Clregory IX died 1241. 
Earthquake in Scotland, 1816. 



33) 10th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 19. Day's length, 13h. 22m. 

G. Coleman, the elder, Dramatist, died, 1794. 

Ascension of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 

Battle of Bennington, 1777. 

Frederick the Great died, 1786. 

John, Earl Russell born, 1792. 

Battle of Gravelotte, 1870. 

Robert Herrick, English Poet, born, 1591. 

34) 11th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 18. Day's length, 13h. 28m. 



Lady Mary Wortley Montcigue died, 1762. 
Dr. F. J. Gall, founder of phrenology, died, 
W^illace beheaded, 1305. [1828. 

St. Bartholomew, Apostle. 
25th or 27th, Landing of Csesar in England, 
Sir Rob. Walpole born, 1676. [55 B. C. 

Dog days end. 



11 


Sun. 


5 19 


6 41 


1 15 


15 


Mon. 


5 20 


6 40 


2 12 


16 


Tues. 


5 21 


6 39 


3 2 


17 


Wed. 


5 22 


6 38 


3 51 


18 


Thurs 


5 23 


6 37 


4 38 


19 


Fnd. 


5 24 


6 36 


sets 


20 


Sat. 


5 25 


6 35 


7 47 



21 


Sun. 


5 26 


6 34 


8 40 


22 


Mon. 


5 27 


6 33 


9 12 


23 


lues. 


5 28 


6 32 


9 49 


•4J4 


Wed. 


5 29 


6 31 


10 29 


25 


rhuis. 


5 30 


6 30 


11 10 


26 


Frid. 


5 31 


6 29 


11 53 


27 


Sat. 


5 32 


6 28 


morn 



35) 


12th Sunday after Trinity. 


Mark 7. Day's length, 12h. 54m. 


28 
29 
30 
31 


Sun. 

VlOM. 

Tues. 
Wed. 


5 33 
5 34 
5 35 
5 36 


6 27 
6 2B 
6 25 
6 24 


12 41 1 

1 43 . 1 

2 47 

3 49 


Leigh Hunt died, 1859. 
John Locke, Philosopher, born, 1632. 
Union defeat at Richmond, Ky. 
John Bunyan died 1683. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5647.— August 20. and 21. 
Rosh Codesh Elul. 





For the Southern States. 




15 


9th Month. 


SEPTEMBER. 


30 


Days. 


Calculated 


for the Latitude of the Southerr\ States. 





MOON'S PHASES. 

Full Moon 2d. 5h. 

Last Quarter lOd. 9h. 

New Moon 17d. 8h. 

First Quarter 24d. Ih. 



52m. Morning. 
43m. Forenoon. 
9m. Morning. 
43m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month &Week 



Sun 
rises. 

h. m. 



Sun 



h. m. 



Moon 
r. & s. 

h. m. 



CHROlVOIiOGY 

— OF— 

IMPORTANT EVENTS, 



1 


Tburs. 


5 37 


2 


Frid. 


5 38 


3 


Sat. 


5 39 



6 23 
6 22 
6 21 



4 52 
rises 
7 19 



Napoleon III captured at Sedan, 1870 
Great fire in London, 1666. 
Cromwell died, 1658. 



4 


Sun. 


5 40 


6 20 


7 49 


5 


Mon. 


5 42 


6 18 


8 20 


6 


Tnes. 


5 43 


6 17 


8 49 


7 


Wed. 


5 44 


6 16 


9 18 


8 


Tbnrs. 


5 45 


6 15 


9 54 


9 


Frid. 


5 46 


6 14 


10 33 


10 


Sat. 


5 47 


6 13 


11 16 



11 


Sun. 


5 48 


6 12 


morn 


12 


Mon. 


5 50 


6 10 


12 18 


13 


Tnes. 


5 51 


6 9 


1 30 


14 


Wed. 


5 52 


6 8 


2 39 


15 


Tburs. 


5 53 


6 7 


3 41 


16 


Frid. 


5 54 


6 6 


4 42 


17 


Sat. 


5 55 


6 5 


sets 



36) 13th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 10. Day's lengtli, 12h. 40m. 

Pindar, Lyric poet, 518, B. C. 
Confedei'ates entered Maryland, 1862. 
Geo. Alex. Stevens, M'riter. died, 1784. 
Independence of Brazil, 1822. 
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin. 
James iV, of Scotland, killed, 1513. 
Mungo Park, African Traveler, born, 1771. 

37) 14th Sunday after Trinity. Lulce 17. Day's length, 12h. 24m. 

James Thomson, poet, born, 1700. 
St. Guy, Confessor, 11th century. 
SirWm. Cecil, L'd Burleigh, born, 1520. [1874 
Uprising of the People of New Orleans against the usurping gov't, 
Capture Harper's Ferry by S'ewall JacKson, 
Gabriel Dan'l Fahrenheit died 1736. [1862. 
Battle of Antietam, 1862. 

3§) 15th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 6. Day's length, 12h. 8m. 

(jrilbert Bishop Burnet, hist'an, born, 1643. 

First battle of Paris, 1870. 

Alexander the Grrat born, 356, B. C. 

St. Matthew, Apostle and Evangelist. 

Beginning of Autumn. 

Wm. Ui)Cott, Manusc, Collec, died, 1845. 

Fepin, King of France, 768. 

39) 16th Sunday after Trinity. Lul^e 7. Day's length, llh. 54m. 

Pacific Ocean discovered, 1513. 

Saints Cyprian and Justina, Martyrs, 304. 

Stiassbuig fell, 1870. 

Sir Wm. Jones, Oriental Scholar, born, 1746. 

Michaelmas Day. 

York town invested, 1781. 

Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5647. — Sept. 11. Mashkimim Lislichos. 
19. and 20. Rosh Hashonoh. 5618. 21. Sept. Gedaljah. 



18 


Sun. 


5 56 


6 4 


7 37 


19 


Mon. 


5 57 


6 3 


8 6 


20 


Lues. 


5 58 


6 2 


8 47 


21 


Wed. 


5 58 


6 2 


9 14 


22 


rhurs. 


5 59 


6 1 


10 8 


23 


Frid. 


6 


6 


10 58 


21 


Sat. 


6 1 


5 59 


11 50 



25 


Sun. 


6 3 


5 57 


morn 


26 


Mon. 


6 4 


5 56 


12 52 


27 


Tues. 


6 5 


5 55 


1 46 


28 


Wed. 


6 6 


5 54 


2 42 


29 


Thurs 


6 7 


5 53 


3 89 


30 


Frid. 


6 8 


5 52 


4 35 



16 



PcWhard Frotsc]ie7'\-< Ahnanac and (harden Marmal 



lOth Month, 



OCTOBER 



31 Dav 



Calculated for tl^e Latitude of tl:\e Southern Slates. 



MOON'S PHASES. 



Full :>Ioon.... 
Last Quarter. 

Xew Moon 

First Quarter. 
Full Moon... 



. Id. 
. 9cl. 
6d. 
.23(1. 
31d. 



Kill. 

nil. 

oil. 

12li. 

4h. 



27m. Evening. 
37m. Evening, 
lorn. Evening. 
25m. Afternoon. 
10m. Evening. 



DAT 
OF 

Month &Week 


Sun 
rises 

li. ni. 


Snn 
sets, 

11, m. 


Moon : 
r. & s. ] 

li. m 1 


CHROXOLCGY 

OF — 

JM I'dHTA A T R VES TS. 


l-!sat. 1 6 9 5 51 rises 


Fultou's fii->t Steamboat trip. 1807. 


40 1 17th Sunday after Trinity. 


Luke li. Day's length, llh. lOm. 



2 Sun. 


6 10 


5 50 


6 43 


3 Mon. 


6 11 


5 49 


7 15 


4 Tues. 


6 12 


5 48 


7 49 


5 jWed. 


6 14 


5 46 


8 20 


6 iTburs. 


6 15 


5 45 


8 55 


7 IFrid. 


6 1(3 


5 44 


9 37 


8 !Sat. 


6 17 


5 43 


10 26 ; 



AufliL- exeCMited as a spy. 1780. 

Black Hawk died. 1838." 

Battle of Germaiitowii. 1777. 

Horace Walpole born. 1717. 

Jeauy Liud born, 1820. 

Margaret, Maid of Norway, died 1200. 

Battle of Perry ville, Kv., 1862. 



41 1 18th Sunday after Trinitv. Matth. 22. Dav"s length, llh. 24m. 



9 


Sim. 


r 6 18 


5 42 


11 19 





Mon. 


6 19 


5 41 


morn 


1 


Tnes. 


6 20 


5 40 


1 13 


2 


Wed. 


6 21 


5 39 


2 19 


3 


Thnrs. 


6 28 


5 37 


3 27 ' 


4 


Frid. 


6 24 


5 36 


4 30 


5 


Sat. 


G 25 


5 35 


5 31 



Great fire in Chicago, 1871. 

Beujamiu "West, Painter, boru, 1738. 

America discoyrrad. 1492. 

St. Wilfrid, Bishop of York. 709. 

Battle of Queenstown, 1^12. 

Battle of Jena. 1806. 

Virgil, Latin Poet, bcn-u, 70 B. C. 



42 1 19th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 9. Day's length, lih. 8m. 

Marie Antoinette beheaded. 1793. 

Burgoyne surrendered, 1777. 

Last State Lottery drawn in Engl. 1826. 

Cornwallis suirendered. 1781. 

M. Dahl. Swed. Portrait Painttr. died. 1743. 

Battle of Trafalgar, 1805. 

Charles Martel died, 741. 



16 


Suu. 


6 26 


5 34 


sets i 


17 


Mon. 


6 27 


5 33 


6 49 \ 


18 


Fues. 


6 28 


5 32 


7 31 


19 


Wed. 


' 6 29 


5 3l 


8 13 


20 


Thurs. 


6 30 


5 30 


9 8 


21 


Frid. 


6 31 


5 29 


10 7 


22 


Sat. 


6 32 


5 28 


10 57 



43 1 20th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 



'^,•7 



Day's length, loh. 54m. 



23 


Sun. 


6 33 


5 27 


ll 56 


24 


Mon. 


6 34 


5 26 


morn 


25 


Tiles. 


6 35 


5 25 


12 2 


26 


Wed. 


6 36 


5 24 


1 4 


27 


Thurs 


6 37 


5 23 


2 8 


28 


Frid. 


6 38 


5 22 


3 9 


29 


Sat. 


G 39 


, 5 21 


4 10 



Dr. John Jortin, Critic, born, 1698. 

Daniel Webster died, 1852 

Dr. James Beattie, Poet, born. 173" 

Hogarth died. 1765. 

Cuba djscoyered, 1492. 

Battle at ^\hite Plains. 1776. 

Surrender ot Metz, 1n70. 



44) 21st Sunday after Trinity 



John 4. Day's length, IQh. 40ni. 



3i» Sa-n.i 6 40 I 5.20 j. 5 19 
31 ;Mon. ; 6 41 i 5 19 I rises 



Sol linen's Temple delicated, 1004 B. C. 
All Hallow Eve 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. — 5648. — 3. and 4. October. First days of 

Suckoth. 10, Schemini Azereth. 11. Simchas Torah. 18. and 19. 

Piosh Chodesh Marcheschwan. 





For the Southern States. 




17 


nth Month. 


NOVEMBER. 


30 


Days. 


Calculated 


for tlrie Latitude of the Southerr\ 


states. 





MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter .. 8d. llh. 

New Moon 15d. '2li. 

First Quarter 22d. oh. 

Full Moon 3Ud; lOh. 



ilm. Forenoon. 
18m. Morning. 
23m. Morning. 
uOm. Forenoon. 



DAY 

OF 

month. &Weeli 



Sun 


8uu 


Moon 


rises. 


sets. 


r. & s. 


h. m. 


li. m. 


Ii. m. 



CHRONOI.OGY 

— or— 
JMPORTAST Kl'EyTS. 



1 


Tues. 


6 42 


5 18 


6 35 


2 


Wed. 


6 13 


5 17 


7 9 


3 


Thurs. 


6 44 


5 16 


7 50 


4 


Frid. 


6 45 


5 15 


8 34 


5 


-;ut. 


B 45 


5 15 


9 33 



All Saiuts Da}'. 

All Souls Day. 

Malaehy, Archbishop of Armagh, 1148. 

George Peabody died, 1869. 

The American 74 launched, 1782. 



6 


Sun. 


6 46 


5 14 


10 24 


7 


Mon. 


6 47 


5 13 


11 26 


8 


Tues. 


6 48 


5 12 


morn 


9 


Wed. 


6 49 


5 11 


12 11 


U 


Thurs. 


6 50 


5 10 


1 13 


1 


Frid. 


6 51 


5 9 


2 19 


2 


Sat. 


6 52 


5 ■ 8 


3 28 



45) 22d Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 18. Day's length, lOh. 28m. 



Battle of Port Eoyal, 1861. 

John Kyrle, "The Man of Koss, " died. 1724, 

Cortez entered Mexico, 1519. 

Great lire in Boston, 1872. 

Mahomet, Arabian Prophet, boru, 570. 

Martinmas. 

iSherman left Atlanta, 1864. 



46) 23d Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 22. Day's length, lOh. 14m. 



French entered Vienna, 1805. 

Sir Chas. Lyell, Geologist, born, 1797. 

John Keppler, great Astronomer, died. 1630. 

Tiberius, Eoman Emperor, born, 42 B. C. 

Suez Canal opened 1869. 

Fort Lee taken by the British, 1776. 

St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Widow, 1231. 



4T) 24th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 9. Day's length, lOh. 4m. 



Thomas Chatterton, Poet, born, 1752. 
Presentation of the Blessed Virgin. 
Professor Dugald Steward born, 1753. 
Th. Henderson, Prof ofAstron., died 1844. 
Battle of Lookout Mountain, 1863. 
Evacuation of New York, 1783. 
John Elwes, noted Miser, died, 1789. 



13 


Sun. 


6 53 


5 7 


4 26 


14 


Mon. 


6 54 


5 6 


5 24 


15 


Tues. 


6 54 


5 6 


sets 


16 


Wed. 


6 55 


5 5 


6 24 


17 


Thurs. 


6 56 


5 4 


7 3 


18 


Frid. 


6 57 


5 3 


7 57 


19 


Sat. 


6 57 


5 3 


8 51 



20 


Sun. 


6 58 


5 2 


9 30 


21 


Mon. 


6 59 


5 1 


10 46 


22 


Tues. 


7 


5 


11 45 


23 


Wed. 


7 1 


4 59 


morn 


24 


Thurs. 


7 1 


4 59 


12 44 


25 


Frid. 


7 2 


4 58 


1 28 


26 


Sat. 


7 2 


4 58 


2 27 



48) 1st Sunday in Advent. 



Matth. 21. 



Day's length, 9h. 54m. 



27 


Sun. 


7 3 


4 57 


3 41 


28 


Mon. 


7 3 


4 57 


4 39 


29 


rues. 


7 3 


4 57 


5 33 


30 


Wed. 


7 4 


4 56 


rises 



Steam Printing, 1814. 
Washington Irving died, 1859. 
Sir Philip Sidney, Poet, born, 



1554. 



^ „-..^^ .V.,^^.„^^, J.w^., WV^.»i.., ^,^-^J.. 

U. S. took possession of Louisiana, 1803 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5648.— 17. Ilosh Chudesh Kislev 



18 



Bicharcl Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



12th Month. 



DECEMBER 



31 Davs 



Calculated for tl:\e Latitude of tt\e Southern States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Last Quarter 7d. 9h. 

New Moon ..14d. 2h. 

First Quarter 22a. Ih. 

Full Moon 30d. 2li. 



50m. Evening. 

Im. Evening. 

41m. Morning. 

54m. Morning. 



^ , ^, Sun 

Month &Weekl h. m. 


Sun 
set3. 

h. m. 


Moon 
r. ^: s. 

li ni. 


CHRONOLOGY 
IJlFOHTAyT EIESTS. 


1 
2 
3 


Thurs 7 5 
Frid. 7 6 
Sat. 7 6 


4 55 
4 54 
4 54 


6 26 

7 33 

8 47 


Princess A. Comnena. Historian, born 1083- 

Hernan Cortez died 1547. 

Eobert Bloomtield, Poet, born, 1776. 


49) 2d Sunday i 


n Adv 


mt. 


Luke 21. Lay's Length, 9h. 46m. 



4 


Siiu. 


7 7 


4 53 


9 55 





Mon. 


7 7 


4 53 


10 56 


6 


Tue.s. 


7 7 


4 53 


11 59 


7 


Wed. 


7 S 


4 52 


morn 


8 


Thurs. 


7 8 


4 52 


12 47 





Frid. 


7 8 


4 52 


1 59 


10 


Sat. 


7 9 


4 51 


3 5 



Pope John XXII died, 1334. 

Carlyle born, 1795. 

St. Nicholas, Archbishop of Mj-ra, 342. 

Cicero, Eoman orator; assassinated, 43 B. C. 

Immaculate Concepticu of Blessed Virgin. 

Milton born, 1608. 

Louis Napoleon elected President. 1848. 



50) 3d Sunday in Advent. 



Matth. 11. 



Day's Length, 9h. 42m. 



11 


§U11. 


7 9 


4 51 


4 12 


12 


Men. 


7 9 


4 51 


5 13 


13 


Tues. 


7 9 


4 51 


6 15 


14 


Wed. 


7 10 


4 50 


sets 


15 


Thurs. 


7 10 


4 50 


6 15 


16 


Frid. 


7 10 


4 50 


7 3 


17 


Sat. 


7 10 


4 50 


8 4 



Louis, Prince of Conde, died, 1686. 

St. Columba. Abbot in Ireland, 584. 

Battle of Fredericksburg, 1862. 

Washington died, 1799. 

David Don, Bofani.st, died. 1841. 

Great Fire in New York, 1835. 

Ludw. Beethoven, emin. comp. , born, 1770. 



51) 4th Sunday in Advent. 



John 1. 



Dav's Lenfi-th, 9h. 38m. 



18 


Still. 


7 11 


4 49 


9 10 


19 


Mon. 




4 49 


10 5 


20 


Tues. 


7 11 


4 49 


11 3 


21 


Wed. 


7 12 


4 45 


11 59 


0-2 


Thurs 


7 11 


4 49 


morn 


23 


Frid. 


7 11 


4 49 


12 35 


24 


Sat. 


7 11 


4 49 


1 10 



St. "Winebald, Abbot and Confessor, 760. 

Capt. W. Ed. Parry. Arct. Nav., born 1790. 

Secession ord. passed in S. Carolina. 1860. 

St. Thomas, Apostle. 

Emp. Vitellius beheaded at Kome, 69 A. D. 

Newton born, 1642. 

Treaty of Ghent 1814. 



52) Christmas Sunday 



Luke 2. 



Day's Length, 9h. 38m 



25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



§1111. 


7 11 


4 49 


2 3 


Mon. 


7 10 


4 50 


3 1 


Tne.s. 


7 10 


4 50 


4 9 


Wed. 


7 10 


4 50 


5 19 


Thin-s. 


7 9 


4 51 


6 14 


Frid. 


7 9 


4 51 


rises 


Sat. 


7 9 


4 51 


6 20 



Nativity of our Lord. Christmas Day. 

Battle of Trenton, 1776. 

St. John. Apostle and Evangelist. 

Macauley died. 1859. 

Union repulsed at Yicksburg, ]\Iis.s., 1862. 

Titus. Roman Emperor, hnrn, 41 A. D. 

Battle of Murfn^esboro, 1862. 



Je\vish Festivals and Fasts.- 5648.- 11. C'hanukali. 
16. Fiosh Chodesh Tlioljet. : 



Fo7^ the Southern States. 19 



THE VZGETABLE GAEDEN. 

The sizo depends upon the purposes for wliieli it is intended ; 
whether the family is larg-e or small, and the time whieh can be de- 
voted to its cultivation. The most suitable soil for a garden is a light 
loam. When the soilts too heavy, it ought to be made light by apply 
ing stable manure, and working up the ground thoroughly. Trench- 
ing as done in Europe, or North, is not advisable, at least where there 
is any coco, as by trenching the roots of this pest will get so deeply 
incorporated with the soil that trouble will be met with afterwards to get 
rid of it,' Exposure towards the east is desirable. If there are one or 
more large ;trees in the garden, or on the immediate outside, their 
shade can be used in which to aow Celery, Cabbage and other seeds 
during the hot summer months, which will be an advantage. The 
seed beds for this purpose should be so arranged as to receive only 
the mxorning or evening sun. It is of the greatest importance that the 
ground should be well drained, otherwise it will be impossible to raise 
good vegetables. The most reliable manure for general purposes is 
well decomposed stable or barnyard manure. Cow manure will suit 
best for light, sandy soil, and horse manure for heavy, stiff clay lands. 
For special purposes, Peruvian Guano,. Blood Fertilizer, Eav/ Bone 
Cotton Seed Meal and other commercial manures may be employed 
with advantage. Of late years most gardeners who work their land 
with a plow, use Cow peas as a fertilizer with excellent results. They 
are sown broad-cast at the rate of Ih bushels to the acre, and when 
large enough they are turned under. Where the land is very sandy, 
cotton seed meal has the most lasting effect. For ciuick growing crops, 
such as Melons, Cucumbers^^^etc, the Blood Fertilizer and Guano a]:»- 
plied in the hills are very good. Soap suds are good for Celery; it is 
astonishing to perceive the difference in the size of those stalks which 
are watered every fev/ days with the suds, and others on the same 
ground which are not. Wood ashes are best for Peas, either used as 
a top dressing when the Peas just come out of the ground, or else 
sprinkled in the row^ when planted. The New Orleans market 
gardeners raise as fine vegetables as can be produced any v/here ; in 
fact, some varieties cannot be excelled, and very few gardeners use 
anything but stable manure. 

Rotation of Crops is another important item. Beets, Carrots 
and other roots should not be grown in succession on the same ground, 
but should be changed to those which grow above ground, such as 
Lettuce, Beans, Peas, etc. Good seed, good ground and good culti- 
vation are essential in order to raise good vegetables. When plants 
are up the ground should be stirred frequently ; weeds ought not to 
be suffered to go into seed, l)ut should be destroyed as soon as they 
appear. Hoeing and working the young crops during dry weather 
is very beneficial, because the weeds are then easily killed, and hoe- 
ing the ground will make it retain moisture better than if it were left 
alone. 



20 



Bichard Frotscher' s Abnaita.L' and Garden Manual 




THE HOT BED. 



Owing to the open winters in the South, hot beds are not so muc-h 
used as in the Xorth, except to raise such tender plants as Egg-Phmts. 
Tomatoes and Peppers. There is little forcing of vegetables done 
here, except as regards Cucumbers and Lettuce ; and, if we do not 
have any hard frosts, the latter does better in the open ground than 
under glass. To make a hot bed is a very simple thing. Any one who 
has the use of tools can make the wooden frame : the sashes may be 
obtained from any sash factory. I consider a wooden frame from five 
to six feet wide and ten feet six inches long a very good size. It 
should be at least six inches higher at the back than in the front. 
and covered by three sashes Sixo feet. The manure ought not to be 
over one month old ; it should be thrown together in a heap, and when 
commencing to heat, be worked over with a fork, and all the long and 
short manure evenly mixed. In this State the ground is generally 
low, and to retain the heat of the manure for a longer time it is best 
to put the manure on top of the ground— that is, make a bank two 
feet longer and two feet wider than the frame. Keep the edges 
straight and the corners firm ; when thrown up about eighteen inches 
trample the manure down to six or eight inches, then put on another 
layer of eighteen inches and trample down again : place thereon the 
frame and sash, and fill in six inches of good earth. After about five 
days stir the ground to kill the weeds which may have come up, then 
sow the seeds. In lower Louisiana the ground is too wet to dig out 
eighteen inches deep, throw in the manure and trample down as re- 
commended in the Xorth : by a few hard rains, such as we fre- 
Cjuently have in winter, the manure would become so soaked beneath- 
the ground that the heat would be gone. Another advantage, when 
the frame is put above the ground, is, that it will go down with 
the manure gradually, and there remains always the same space 
between the glass and the ground. If the ground is dug out and the 
manure put into the frame, the ground will sink down so low after a 
short time that the sun will have little effect upon it, and plants will 
become spindly. 



For the Southern States. 21 



SOWING SEEDS, 



Some seeds are sown at once where they are to remain and mature. 
Others are sown in seed beds and transplanted afterAvards. Seeds 
should be covered according to their sizes, a covering of earth twice 
the size of the seed is about the maximum. Some seeds, such as 
Beans, Corn and Peas, can be covered from one to two inches, and 
they will come up well. Here is a difference again : Wrinkled Peas 
and Sugar Corn have to be covered lighter and more carefully than 
marrowfat Peas or the common varieties of Corn. It depends upon 
the nature of the soil, season of the year, etc. For instance, in heavy 
wet soil seeds have to be covered lighter than in sandy light ground. 
Seeds which are sown during summer in the open ground, such as 
Beets and Carrots, should be soaked over night in w^ater and rolled 
in ashes or plaster before sowing ; they will come up quicker. AYhen 
they are sown in a seed bed, the ground should be light enough not 
to bake after a rain. Some varieties of seeds require shade when 
sown during the summer, such as Cauliflow^er, Celery and Lettuce. 
Care should be taken to have the shade at least three feet from the 
ground, and shade only after the sun has been on the bed for two or 
three hours, and remove again early in the afternoon, so the plants 
may become sturdy. If too much shaded they wall be draw^n up, long- 
legged, and not fit to be set out in the open ground. The most suc- 
cessful cabbage planters in this neighborhood sow their seeds in the 
open ground, towards the end of July and during August, and give 
them no shade, but water and keep the ground moist from the day of 
sowing till the plants are transplanted. Seeds should be sown thinly 
in the seed bed. If plants come up too thickly they are apt to damp off. 
Lettuce seed should be sprouted during the hot months before 
sowing, according to directions given for June. 

To sow Turnips on a large scale during late summer and early fall 
months, the ground should be prepared in advance, and the seed sown 
just before or during a rain. Small pieces of ground, of course, can 
be sown at any time and watered afterwards. For covering all kinds 
of seeds, a fork is preferable to a rake ; with either implement, care 
must be taken not to cover the seeds too deep. Beans, Peas and Corn 
are covered w^ith the hoe. Some fine seeds, such as Thyme or Tobacco 
are covered enough when pressed with the back of the spade to the 
ground. The seedsman is often blamed for selling seeds which have 
not come up, when the same are perfectly good, but, perhaps, 
through ignorance the party by wdiom thej were sown, placed them 
too deep or too shallow in the ground, or the ground may have l^een 
just moist enough to swell the seeds, and they failed to come up. At 
other times washing rains after sowing beat the ground and form a 
crust that the se'eds are not able to penetrate, or, if there is too much 
fresh manure in the ground, it Vs'ill burn the seed, and destroy its 
vitality. 

When seeds, such as Beans, Cucumbers, Melons and Squash, are 
planted before it is warm enough, they are very apt to rot if it rains- 



Richard FroUcher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



The followiug Tallies will be found useful to the Gardeuev, PaTmer 
and Amateur. 

QUANTITY OF 8EED USUALLY SOWN UP(.)X AN ACRE. 



Beans. Duart. in drills ... la Ba.shel3. 

Beaus, Pole, iu hills 10 to 12 Qts. 

Beets, in drills 1 to 5 lbs. 

Broom Corn, in hills 8 to 10 Qts. 

Bnckwheat --. 1 Bushel. 

Cabbage, in beds, to transplant ... 1 lb. 

Carrots, in drills . 3 to -1 lbs. 

Chinese Sugar Cane ... 12 Qts. 



CIOT 



Eed. alone 12 to 15 lbs. 



Clover. White, aloue 10 to 12 lbs. 

Clover. Lucerne or Alfalfa. 12 lbs. 

Corn, in hills S to 10 Qts. 

Corn, for soiling 3 Bushels. 

Cucumber, in hills 2 lbs. 

Hemp 1^ Bushels. 

Mustard, broad-cast A Bushel. 

Ylelon, Musk, in hills 2 to 3 lbs. 

Melon. Water, in hills 3 to -llb^. 

Millet, broad-cast 1 Bushel. 



<)ats, broad-cast. . 2 to 3 Bushels. 

Onion, iu drills 5 to 6 lbs. 

Onion, for Sets, in drills . . . 20 lbs. 
Onion, Sets, in drills. .6 to 12 Bushels. 

Parsnip, iu drills 4to6 lbs. 

Peas, in drills 1^ Bushels. 

Peas, broad-cast 3 Bushels. 

Potato. I cut tubers;. Iu Bushels. 

Pumpkin, in hilfcs 4 to 6 lbs. 

Radish, in drills S to 10 lbs. 

Sage, in drills 3 to 10 lbs. 

Salsifv, in drilL< S to 10 lbs. 

Spinach, in drills 10 to 12 lbs. 

Squash, (bush var.. i in hills. •! to G lbs. 
Squash, (running var. . . in hills 3 to i lbs. 

Tomato, to transplant .^ lb. 

Turnip, in drills i to 2 lbs. 

Turnii:). broad-cast 1 to 2 lbs. 



QUANTITY OF SEEDS EEQUIKED FOE A GIVEN NUMBEE OF PLANTS. 



Xumber of Hills 

Asparagus 1 oz 

Beet..^ 1 

Beans, Dwari. . .1 qt 

Beans. Pole 

Carrot 1 oz. 

Cucumber 

Corn 

Endive . 1 oz. 

Leek 1 

Melon. ^Vater 

Melon. Musk 

Okra 1 oz 

Onion 1 

Onion. Sets, small. 1 
Parslev 1 oz. 



; or Lenetli of Drills. 
. to 60 teet of drill. 

- 50 
. to 100 
. .1 qt. to 150 hills. 

to 100 feet of drill. 

. . 1 oz to 75 hills. 
. . 1 qt. to 200 hills. 

to 100 feet of drill. 

■ lori 

. . 1 oz. to 30 hills. 
. ..1 ■•■ 60 '' 
. to 40 feet of drill. 

" 100 

qt. to 40 ft. of drill. 

to 125 feet of drill. 



dumber of Hilb 

Parsnip 1 oz. 

Peas 1 qt. 

Pumpkin 

Radish 1 oz. 

Salsifv .... ... 1 

Spinach . , 1 

Squash . . . . 

Turnip 1 oz. 

Cabbage .1 

Cauliflo\^-er 1 

Celerv 1 

Egg Plant .... 1 

LeUuce . 1 

Pepper 1 

Tomato. .1 



; or Length of Drills. 

to 200 feet of drill, 
to 100 

... 1 oz. to 40 hills 

to 100 feet of drill. 
70 

■ 100 

. 1 oz. to 75 hills. 

to 150 feet of drill. 

cz. to 2000 plants. 
- 2000 - 
•• 3000 ■• 
•• 1000 •• 
■ • 300(1 
•■ lOuo 

•■ l5(Ai ■• 



XoTE.— The above calculation? are made for the Spring: if sown during the 
Summer months, twice the quantity of seed will be required for the same amount of 
plants. 

Table shoTring aniDant; of sgvaral varieties of Grass Seed nacassary for an Acre, 
and tlis number of Pounds in a Bustel, 

Xo. of lbs. Quantity for 

to bushel. One Acre. 

Barley 48 2 Bush. 

Blue Grass. ... . . .14 2 " 

Orchard Grass 11 2 ■' 

EedTop Gra.ss ll 2 •• 

Hungarian Grass -1^' 1 '• 

^Millet. German 50 ; - 

T ill Meadow Oat Grass 12 5 '^ 

Rescue Grass. 14 1* ■ 

Timothy .45 !^ 

Italian Rye Grass 2U 3 • • 

Bermuda Grass — 3 Ib.^. 

Eed Clover . . .60 10 '■' 



Xo. of lbs. 


Quantitv for 


to bushel. 


One Acre. 


White Clover 60 


8 lbs. 


Alfalta Clover. 60 


8 'J. 


Johnson Grass . . 25 


30 '• 


EndishEve Grass ..20 


50 •• 


Eve 56 


H Bush. 


Eed Eu.st Proof Oats.32 


1-, •• 


Buckwheat .56 


1 


Wheat 60 


H '' 


Sorghum 50 


5 lbs. 


Meadow Fescue Grassl5 


2 Bush. 


Honev Grass. fHolcus 




lanatus) 7 


9 

- 



For the SouiUern States. 



2:i 



Descriptive Catalogue of Vegetable Seeds. 



ARTICHOKE. 

Artichaut (Fr.), Aetirchoke (Ger. ), Alcachofa fSp.)- 




Green Globe Artichoke 




Early Campania. 

Large Green Olobe. This is a very popular vegetable in the 
South, and much esteemed by the native as well as the foreign popu- 
lation from the South of Europe. It is extensively cultivated for the 
New Orleans market. It is best propagated from suckers which come 
u]~> around the large plants. Take them off during the fall and early 



24 Eicharcl Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



winter months ; plant tlieni four feet apart eaeh wa.y. Every fall the 
sroimd should be manured and spaded or plowed between them. If 
planted by seed, sow them in drills during winter or early spring, 
three inches apart and one foot frnni mw to row; cover with about 
one-half inch of earth. The following fall the plants can be trans- 
planted and cultivated as recommended above. The seeds I offer are 
imported by me from Italy, and of superior, quality : I can also fuf"nish 
sprouts or plants in the fall of the year. 

Early €aiiii>a»ia. An early variety imported b^' me from 
Italy and which fruited for the first time the past season. The cut 
represents as it grows, and has been taken from a branch brought to 
me ; it is flatter at the base than the Globe : being very early I con- 
sider it quite an ac«quisition. 



ASPARAGUS. 

AsPEEGE iFr.), Spaegel, (Ger.\ Espaeagos (Sp.^ 

Purple Top, The Asparagus is not extensively cultivated in the 
South ; not that it is not liked well enough, but from the fact that it 
does not succeed as well as in more Northern latitudes. It seems that 
it is short-lived, the roots giving out soon or throwing up very small 
shoots. 

The ground should be well manured and prepared before either 
the roots or seeds are planted. For this climate the sowing of seed is 
preferable. Eoots are generally imported from the North, and I have 
found that the roots raised here, one year old, are as strong as those 
received from the North three years old. Plant the seed in early spring. 
Soak over night in water ; plant in rows, or rather hills, one foot apart 
and two feet between ; put from four to five seeds in each hill ; when 
well up thin out to two plants. The following Avinter, when the stalks 
are cut off, cover A^^th a heavy coat of well rotted manure and a sprink- 
ling of salt ; fishbrine will answer the same purpose. In the spring 
fork in the manure between the rows and keep clean of weeds. The 
same treatment should be repeated every year. The bed should not 
be cut before being three years established. Care must be taken not 
to cut the stalks too soon in the fall of the year— not until we have had 
a frost. If cut before, it wdll cause the roots to throw up young shoots, 
which will weaken them. 

BUSH BEANS. 
Culture. 

Place in rows eighteen inches apart. Plant from end of February, 
and for succession, every two or three weeks to May. During June 
and July, Bush Beans planted in this latitude will not produce much. 
August and September are good months in which to plant again ; they 
v.-ill produce abundantly till killed by the frost. Do not cover the 
seeds more than two inches. 



For the Southern States. 



Red Speckled French. 
Early China Red -Eye. 
Red Kidney. 
Dwarf Golden Wax. 
Best of All. 
Improved Valentine. 



POLE BEANS. 

Lima Beans slionld not he ])lanted before tlie ground has become 
warm in spring. Strong poles ought to be set in the ground from four 
to six feet ai)art, and the ground drawn around them before the seed 
is planted. It is always best to plant after a rain and with the eye of 
the bean down. The other varieties can be planted flat, and not more 
than three to four feet apart, and hilled after they are up. Do not 
cover the seeds more than two inches ; one inch is enough for the 
Southern Prolific. 

BEANS.-vDwarf, Snap or Bush.) 

Haricots (Fr.), Bohne (Ger. ), Frijolenano (Sp.). 

Extra Early Six Weeks, or New- 

ington Wonder. 
Early Valentine Red Speckled. 
Early Mohawk Six Weeks. 
Early Yellow Six Weeks. 
German Dwarf Wax. 
White Kidney. 

Extra Early Sax l¥eeks, or Nc^^ing^ton Wonder, is very 
early, but the pods are small and round. Good for family use. 

Early Taleiitinc, one of the best varieties ; i)ods round, tender 
and quite productive; not much planted for the market. Excellent 
for shipping. 

Early Mohawk Six VFeeks. This is a long podded variety, 
and very hardy. It is used to a large extent for the market for the 
first planting ; very productive. 

Early Velloi^" Six Weeks. This is the most popular sort 
among market gardeners. Pods flat and long; a very good bearer, 
but not so good for shipping as the Mohawk or Valentine. 

German Dwarf ^W^ax. A new variety which is unsurpassed 
as a snap bean. Pods are of a w^ax color and have no strings ; quite 
productive. Has come into general cultivation ; cannot be too highly 
recommended. 

H^iiite Kidney. A good strong growing variety, not much 
planted. 

Red Speckled French is another strong growing variety, 
planted a good deal for the New Orleans market as a second crop, 
being about ten days later than the Mohawk and Yellow Six Weeks. 
It is hardy and productive. 

Early China Red-Eye. Early and of good quality, but not 
very popular. 

Red Kidney. This variety is largely planted for the New- 
Orleans market. It is a coarse growing variety, and much used for 
shelling when the pods turn yellow, so that the beans are well 
developed, but yet soft. 



26 



Mlchard Ft^otscher^s Almanac and Garden Manual 





Best of all Beau % natural size. 



Dwarf Golden Wax Bean. 



Du^arf iiroldeai Wax. A dwarf variety ivith flat \k)<1?^, longer 
tlian thf^ Dwarf German Wax; entirely stringless and white., 
mottled with purplish red. This variety will come into general culti- 
vation, and rrill in time take the place of the black seeded Wax, being 
earlier and more productive. 

Best Of All. X new variety from Germany of great merit, intro- 
duced here by me. It is green podded, long and succulent ; it is pro- 
litic and well flavored. An excellent variety for shipping and family 
use. It is not quite so early as the Mohawk, but is of sujierior quality 



For the Southern States. 



27 



for rtiiipiiiiig, .'111(1, tlKM'pforo, is almost tho only kind planted lierc for 
that i<iiri)oso. The out is n a-ood represontation as it "tows ; it shows 
only two-thirds of its natural size. Can not be too highly reeom- 
mended. I expect to have a full supply tfiis year. 

liiipi'ovecl Valentine. This variety has all the good qualities 
of the old Valentine ; only, it is ten days earlier, a great consideration 
when planted for the market; it will supercede the old variety of 
Valentine. 




Improved Valentine. 



BEANS.— POLJi OE EUNNING. 

Haricots a Eames (Fr.,), StanctEX-Bohnen (Ger.), Fpjjol Vastago (Sp.). 
Large Lima. ' German Wax or Butter. 



Carolina or Sew'ee. 
Horticultural or Wren's Egg. 
Dutch Case Knife. 



Southern Frolific. 
Crease Back. 



L.arg'e I^iiiia. A well known and excellent variety. It is the 
best shell hean known. Should have rich ground, and plenty room 
to grovr. 



28 



Richard Froischer's Ahnanac and Garden Manual 



Carolina or Sewee. A varietj^ similar to the Lima; the only 
difference is, the seeds and ])ods are smaller. It is s-enerally oiilti- 
vated, being more productive than the Large Lima. 

Horticultural or Wren's Eg-g-, does not grow very strong; 
bears well, pods about six inches long, which are roundish and very 
tender. 

Butch Case Knife. A very good pole bean; it is early; pods 
broad and long, some^Vhat turned towards the end- 

German Wax, This is a fine variety, and has the same good 
qualities as the German Dwarf Wax. Pods have a waxy appearance ; 
very succulent and tender. 

Southern Prolific. No variety 
will continue longer in bearing than 
this. It stands the heat of the sum- 
mer better than any other, and is 
planted to succeed the other kinds. 
It is a very strong grower ; pods about 
seven inches long and flat ; seeds are 
dark yellow or rather light brown. It 
is the standard variety for the New 
Orleans market, for late spring and 
summer. 

Crease Back. A variety of Pole 
Beans which has been cultivated in 
the South for a long time, but has 
never come into the trade till intro- 
duced by me. It is an excellent bean, 
earlier ihan the ''Southern Prolific."' 
Seeds white ; pods round, with a crease 
in the back, from which the name. It 
is a good grower, bears abundantly, 
and if shipped, will keep better than 
most other kinds. It sells better in the 
spring than any other for shipping 
purposes; and when in season, it can 
not be surpassed. For early summer, 
the Southern Prolific is preferable, 
standing the heat better.. Several 
years ago I received half a bushel 
from near Mobile, Ala., and all the 
beans of this variety about here can 
be traced back to that half bushel. 
I supplied two growers in Georgia 
where it vras not known at that time. 
I expect to have a full supply this 
season. There is a light brown bean, 
streaked and mottled v»'ith dark brown 
and black of the same name; but it 
is not equal to the white variety. 
In some localities this kind is called Whlrc Crea?o Eack Bean>. 




For the Southern States. 



29 



"Calico Crease Back." The white beeded variety is also known in 
some sections by the name of " FatiHorse." 

ENGLIShbBEANS. 

Feve de Marais iFr.j, Puff-Bohne, (Ger.), Haba Comun (Sp.j. 

Broad ^''iiid*>or. Not so much cultivated here as in some jiarts 
of Europe. It is much liked by the people of the Southern part of 
Europe^ Ought to b'e planted during November; as, if planted in the 
spring, they will not produce much. 



BEETS. 

Beteave (Fr.j, Runkelruebe (Ger.), Eemolacha (Sp.j. 

Egyptian Red Turnip. 
Long Red Mangel Wurzel 
White French Sugar. 
Silver or Swiss Chard. 



Extra Early^or.Bassano. 
Simon's Early Red Turnip 
Early Blood Turnip. 
Long Blood. 
Half Long Blood. 



Culture. 



The ground for beets should be rich and well spaded or plowed. 
Sow in drills twelve to eighteen inches apart, cover the seed about 
one inch deep. When about a month old, thin them out to four or six 
inches apart. In this latitude beets are sown from January till the end 
of April, and from the. middle of July till the middle of November ; in 
fact, some market gardeners sow them every month in the year. In 
the summer and fall, it is w-ell to soak the seeds over night and roll 
in plaster before sowing. 

Extra Early, or Rassaiio, is the earliest variety, but not pop- 
ular on account of its color, which is almost white when boiled. 
Earliness is not of so much value here, where there are beets sown 
and brought to the market the whole year round. In the North it is 
different, where the first cro|) of beets in the market in spring will 
bring a better price than the varieties which mature later. 





Simon" s Early Red Turnip Beet. 



Early Blood Turnip Beet. 



30 



Bichard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



§iiMCii'§ Eaily Red Tiiruip. This ib earlier than the Blood 
Turnip, smooth skin and of light red color : planted a good deal hy 
the market gardeners about Xew Orleans. 

Early Blood Turnip. T)^ most popular variety for market 
purposes as well as family use. It is of a dark red color, and ver^- 
tender. This is the principal variety planted for shipping. My stock 
is raised for me from dark selected roots, and can not be excelled. 

Eoiig- Blood. Is not ciuite so tender as the foregoing variety ; it 
is not planted at all for the market, and very little for family use. In 
the Xorth it is chiefly- planted for winter use ; here we have Turnip 
Beets the vrhole vrinter from the garden ; therefore it has not the same 
value. 

Half Long Blood. A very dark red variety of a half long- 
shape ; a good variety for family use. 

L.oiig' Red I^Iaaig-el "Wiirzel. This is raised for stock: it 
grows to a large size. Here in the South where stock is not stabled 
during the winter, the raising of root crops is much neglected. Being- 
very profitable for its food it ought to be more cultivated. 





Egyptian Red Turnip Beet. 



White French Susrar Beet. 



£g:yi>tiaii Red Turnip. This i> a new variety sent uut by 
"Benary*" some years ago. It is very early, tender, deep red and of 
Turnii) shape. Leaves of thi.s variety are smaller than of others. The 



For the Southern Staler 



31 




^il\ci BL(.t or •^wi^'- Chard 



seeds are also much smaller. I recom- 
mend it and consider it a good acquisi- 
tion. The seed of this variety is obtained 
by me from the original source and is 
the finest stock offered. 

White French §ii^ar, is used 
the same as the foregoing ; not much 
planted. 

Silver Beet, or Swiss Chard. 
This variety is cultivated for its large 
succulent leaves, which are used for the 
same purposes as Spinach. It is very popular m the New Orleans 
market. 

BORECOLE, OR CURLED KALE. 

Chou-veet (Fr.j, Gruner Kohl (Ger.;>, Breton iSp.j. 
Dwarf Oeruiaii Oreeiis. 

A vegetable highly esteemed in the Northern part of Europe, but 
very little cultivated in this country. It requires frost to make it 
good for the table. Treated the same as cabbage. 

BROCCOLI. 

Chou Beocoli (rr.\ Spaegel-Kohl (Ger.), Beoculi (Sp.j. 
Purple Cape. 

Resembles the Cauliflower, but not forming such compact heads, 
and not quite so white, being of a greenish east. We raise such fine 
Cauliflower here that very little Broccoli is planted. 

The Purple Cape is the most desirable variety; cultivated the 
same as Half Early Cauliflower ; further North than New Orleans, 
where Cauliflower does not succeed, the Broccoli may be substituted, 
being hardier 




BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Chou de Bruxelles iFr.}, Eosen oe Speos- 

SEN Kohl (Ger.), ^Breton de 

Bruselas (Sp.). 

A vegetable cultivated the same as 
the Cabbage, but very little known here. 
The small heads which appear along the 
upper part of the stalk between the 
leaves, make a fine dish when well i)re- 
liared. 



32 



Richard Frotscher'n Almanac and Garden Manual 



CABBAGE. 

Chou Pomme (Fr.), Kopfkohl (Ger.), Eepollo (Sp.). 



Early York. 
Early Large York. 
Early Sugar Loaf. 
Early Larg-e Oxheart. 
Early Winningstadt. 
Jersey Wakefield. 
Early Flat Dutch. 
Early Drumhead. 
Large Flat BRUNS^vICK. 
Improved Early Summer. 



Improved Large Late Drumhead. 
Frotscher's Superior Late Flat 

, Dutch. 
Red Dutch (for Pickling", 
Green Globe Savoy. 
Early Dwarf Savoy. 
Drumhead Savoy. 
St. Denis or Chou Bonneuil. 
Excelsior. 



During the past "World's Exposition" I exhibited different vege- 
tables as they were in season. Many visitors will recollect the tine 
specimens of Cabbage, Beets, Celery, Cauliflower, Lettuce, Cucum- 
bers, etc., they saw there displayed. I received the Prize for "-Frot- 
seller's Fiat Hiitcli Cabbage" and Early Blood Turnip Beets. 
Ten heads of Cabbage, devoid of all outside leaves, weighed one 
hundred and seventy-three pounds. They were raised on Captain 
Marcy's place, one mile below Algiers.— I did not exhibit these for 
competition, but merely to show to our Northern visitors what fine 
vegetables we have here during the winter, when at their homes every 
thing is covered v»^ith snow and ice. The Committee of Awards on 
Vegetables gave me the Prize without any solicitation on my part,— 
they thinking it well merited. (See inside cover.) 



Cultut'e. 



Cabbage requires a strong, good soil, and should be heavily man- 
ured. To raise large Cabbage without good soil and without working 
the plants well, is an impossibility. Cabbage is sown here almost in 
every month of the year, but the seed for a main crop should be sown 
from July to September. Some sow^ earlier, but July is time enough. 
For a succession, seed can be sown till November. Early varieties 
are sown during winter and early spring. Cabbage is a very impor- 
tant crop and one of the best pa/ydng for the market gardener. It re- 
quires more work and attention than most people are willing to give, 
to raise cabbage plants during the months of July and August. I 
have found, by careful observation, that plants raised in August are 
the surest to head here. The most successful gardeners in raising 
cabbage plants, sow the seeds thinly in seed-beds, and water several 
times during the day; in fact, the seed bed never is cillowed to get 



Fo7' the Southern States. 



33 



dry from the sowing of the seed till large enough to transplant. There 
is no danger in doing this of scalding the plants, as manj^ would sup- 
pose ; but on the contrary, the plants thrive well, and so treated, will 
be less liable to be attacked by the cabbage-flies, as they are too often 
disturbed during the day. Tobacco stems chopped up and scattered 
between the plants and in the walks between the beds, are a j}reventa- 
tive against the fly. 

Early York. This is an early variety, but very little grown 
here except for family use. As we have cabbage headiijg up almost 
the whole year, it has not the same value as in Northern climates, 
where the first cabbage in spring brings a good price. 

Larg-e York. About two to three weeks later than the above, 
forming hard heads; not grown for the market. Recommended for 
family use. 

Early Sug-ar Eoaf. Another pointed variety, with spoon- 
shaped leaves ; sown in early spring for an early summer cabbage. 

Early Earge Oxiieart. An excellent variety, which is later 
than the Large York, and well adapted for sowing in fall or early 
spring. 

Early ^Wiiiniiigstadt. This is a very fine solid-heading variety ; 
pointed and of good size, of the same season as the Oxheart. It is 
very good for family use. It does not suit the market, as no pointed 
cabbage can be sold to any advantage in the New Orleans market. 





Early York Cabbage. 




Lirge \ork Cabbage 



Early Large Oxiieart. 




Early Winningstadt. 



34 



Blchard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden ManuaJ 




Green Globe Savoy. 



Earlv D-\varf Savoy. 




Drunihea<;l Savoy 



St. Denis- or Chou Bonneuil. 



.--^^ 




^^, 



'^ 







FroTscher's Superior Late Flat Dutch. 



For the Soutliern States 



Jersey Vt^akefielcl. Very popalai' in the North, but little 
planted here. It is of medium size and heads up well. 

Early Flat Dutch. An intermediate variety between the early 
pointed and late varieties. It is not, on an average, as heavy as the 
Oxheart or Winningstadt, but, if raised for the market, more salable 
on account of being flat. Very good variety for family use. 

Early Di'iiiiiliead. A similar variety to the above; a little 
earlier, and not making as many leaves, it can be planted close. A 
good early spring cabbage. 

Ear^e Flat Briins\%Jek:. This is a late German variety, intro- 
duced by me about twenty years ago. It is an excellent variety, and 
when well headed up the shape of it is a true type of a Premium Flat 
Dutch Cabbage. It requires very rich ground, and should be sown 
early, as it is a little more susceptible of frost than the Superior Flat 
Dutch. It is well adapted for shipping, being very hard, and does not 
wilt so quick as others. At Frenier, along the Jackson Eailroad, this 
is the kind principally planted, and is preferred over all other varie- 
ties. The people living there plant nothing else except cabbage, and 
have tried nearly all highly recommended varieties, and this is their 
choice. At that place the seeds are sown in October and November. 
The bulk of the cabbage raised there is shipped North in April and 
May, and is the finest which comes to the Chicago market. 





Early Drumhead Cabbage. 



Improved. Early Summer. 



Improved Early Sunimer. This cabbage is of recent intro- 
duction. It is not quite so large as the Brunswick, but earlier; for 
fall it can be sown in August ; for spring, in November and as late as 
January. It heads up very uniform and does not produce many out- 
side leaves. It is hardier than the Brunswick, and stands the cold 
and heat better. The seed I offer is of the best strain cultivated, and 
can be planted closer together than the late varieties —say about 8000 
to the acre. The finest crop of this variety (one hundred and fifty 
thousand heads of cabbage) I ever saw, was raised last year near the 
city. The grower could commence on one end of the row to cut, and 
continue to the end, all well headed. 

Improved Earjfe Eate Drumhead. Fine large variety; 
should be sown early in the fall for winter, or during December and 
January for late spring use ; it will stand more cold weather than the 
Brunswick. 



36 PdcJiard FrotscJter's Almanac and Garden Manual 



l§iiperior L,jite Flat Diiicli. This is the most popular variety 
for winter cabbage, and cultivated by almost every gardener who 
l)lant3 for the New Orleans market. My stock is of superior quality, 
and I venture to say that seventy-five per cent, of all cabbage sold in 
the New Orleans market are of seeds which have been obtained from 
my store. During winter and spring, specimens which are brought 
as samples to my establishment, weighing from fifteen to twenty-five 
pounds, can be frequently seen. In regard to the time of planting, 
see remarks under head of "Cabbage " in the directions for planting 
for July. I have tried seed of the Flat Dutch from different growers, 
but have found none yet to equal the stock I have been selling for 
years, and which is raised for me by contract. 

Red Duteli. Mostly used for pickling or salads. Very little 
cultivated. 

Oreeii Olobe Savoy. Medium sized heads, not very hard, but 
all the leaves can be used. This and the following varieties are of 
fine flavor, and preferred byjnany over the other varieties. 

Early D\%^arf Savoy. Heads rather small, but solid : leaves 
very curled and succulent ; of a dark green color. Very fine for 
family garden. 

Driiiiilieacl Savoy. Leaves are wrinkled, but not quite so 
much as the two foregoing kinds. It grows to a good size with large 
roundish heads. 

St. Denis, or Cliou Bon lie nil. This was, at one time, one of 
the most popular varieties grown for this market, but during the past 
few years has not done as well as formerly, and is, therefore, planted 
very little now. It wants good ground and high cultivation. It does 
better for spring than for fall. Should be sown in November. 

Excelsior. There are several varieties called by this name. 
What I offer is a second early variety ; light green color, but few out- 
side leaves and a large roundish head. It is not as hardy as the Supe- 
rior Flat Dutch, and did excellently when planted for the sirring. 
Seed sown last season as late as January, produced fine, large heads. 
It stands the heat better than the Brunswick. This variety, the 
Brunswick and Early Summer, are the best to plant for shipping in 
spring. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

CH0UFLEUR(Fr.), Blumenkohl (,Ger.), Coliflor (Sp.). 

Extra Early Paris. i Early Italian Giant. 
Half Early Paris. Late Italian Giant. 

Early Erfurt. Imperial (new). 

Le Normands (short stemmed). I Large Algiers. 

This is one of the finest vegetables grown, and succeeds well in the 
neighborhood of New Orleans. Large quantities are raised on the 
sea coast in the neighborhood of Barataria Bay. The two Italian 
varieties are of excellent quality, growing to large size, and are con- 



For the Southern States. 



37 



sidered hardier than the Geniian and French varieties. I have had 
specimens brought to the store, raised from seed obtained from me, 
weighing sixteen pounds. The ground for planting Cauliflower should 
be very rich. They thrive best in rich, sandy soil, and require plenty 
of moisture during the formation of the head. The Italian varieties 
should be sown from April till July ; the latter month and June is the 
best time to sow the Early Giant. During August, September and 
October, the Le Normands, Half Early Paris, and Erfurt can be sown. 
The Half Early Paris is very popular, but the other varieties are just 
as good. For spring crop the Italian kinds do not answer, but the 
early French and German varieties can be sown at the end of Decem- 
ber and during January, in a bed protected from frost, and may be 
transplanted during February and as late as March into the open 
ground. If we have a favorable season, and not too dry, they will be 
very line ; but if the heat sets in soon, the flowers will not obtain the 
same size as those obtained from seeds sowm in fall, and which head 
during December and January. 

Extra Early 

tender. 



Paris. The earliest variety ; heads small ; very 



Half Early Paris. The most popular in the New Orleans 
market. Heads of good size, white and compact. 

Early Erfurt. This variety is of more dw^arfish growth than 
the two forjuer. Heads white and of good size. Heads with certainty. 

Ee rVoriiiaiids is a French variety, and largely cultivated here. 
It stands more dry weather than the other varieties, and has large 
and pure white heads. Not so popular as the Half Early Paris in this 
market, but there is no good reason why it should not be, as it is an 
excellent variety in every respect; stands the heat better than any 
other. 




Le NonuiiiKls, vhort-stciniiic<l Caiilifldwcr 



38 FJ.chard Frot.<chers Almannc and Garden Alanurd 




Large Algiers. 

L,ar§re Alg'iers. A Preneh variety of the same season as the 
Le Xormands. bur a surer producer. It is one of the best kinds, and 
has taken the place of other second early varieties since it has been 
introduced. 

Early Italian Giaut. Very large fine sort, not quite so late 
as the Late Italian, and almost as large. The heads are ciuite large, 
white and compact, and of delicious flavor. I recommend it to all 
who have not tried it. When sown at the proper season, it will head 
with certainty, and will not fail to give satisfaction. 

Late Italiau Oiaiit. This is the largest of all the Cauliflowers. 
It is grown to a considerable extent in the neighborhood of Xew Or- 
leans. It is very large and compact; should not be sown later than 
■June, as it takes from seven to nine months before it heads. 




Ecirly Italian Giant Cauliflower. 



For the Southern States. 



39 



Imperial. (New.) A variety from France, very similar to the 
Le Normands, perhaps a little earlier; very good. I recommend it 
highly. 

CARROT. 

Carotte (Fr.), Moehre or Gelbe Euebe (Ger.), ZanahoeiaSp,). 

Early Scarlet Horn, St. Valerie. 

Half Long Scarlet French. | Half Long Luc. 

Improved Long Orange. j Danvers Intermediate. 

Long Ked, without core. I 

Requires a sandy loam, well manured, and deeply spaded up. 
Should be sown in drills ten or twelve inches apart, so the plants can 
be worked after they are up. Gardeners here generally sow them 
broad-cast, and often the roots are small from being crowded too 
much together. 

Early Scarlet Horn. A short, stump-rooted variety of medium 
size, very early and of fine flavor. Not cultivated for the market. 

Half L.oiigr French Scarlet. This is the most popular variety, 
and extensively grown for the market as well as for family use. It is 
a little later than the Early Horn, but much larger ; bright scarlet in 
color, and of fine flavor. 

Half JLong- L.uc. This is a new variety from France. It is as 
early as any previously mentioned, but stump-rooted and larger. It 
is very smooth and of a fine color. 

Improved Long- Orang-e. This is an old variety ; roots long 
and of deep orange color. It is not much cultivated in this section, 
and the flavor is not so tine as that of the two preceding kinds. 
Valuable for field culture. 




Early ^icarlct Iloru rnn'or. 



Half Louu- Luc Cnrror, 



HdU Long French 
S:.'arlet Carrot. 



40 



Eichard Frotschers Almanac and Garden Manual 




Long Red Carrot, without core. St. Valerie Carrot. Danvers" Intermediate. 

L.ong' Red, Tvithout core. A new Tariety from France, which is 
of cylindrical shape, very smooth, bright scarlet color, and of fine 
flaYor ; has no heart or core. It is not quite so early as the Half 
Long, but more productive. Consider it a first-class variety for the 
table, and one that will come into general cultivation when better 
known. 

St. Valerie. A new variety from France, bright red in color ; a 
little larger and longer than the Half Long French, and stronger in 
the leaves. This is one of the finest carrots, and will take the place 
of the Half Long in the course of time. It is very smooth. 

Danvers. An intermediate American variety of recent intro- 
duction. It is of a bright orange color ; very smooth ; symmetrically 
formed ; somewhat stump-rooted like the Half Long Luc. It will 
produce more in weight to the acre than any other Half Long variety. 



Celeei ^Fr. 
Large White Solid, 
tuenip-eooted. 



CELERY. 

Selleeie f'Ger.), Apio (Sp. ). 

I DwAEF Laege Eibbed. 

I CUTTIXG. 



New. 



Sow in May and June for early transplanting, and in August 
and September for a later crop. Sow thinly and shade during the 
hot months. When the plants are six inches high, transplant 



^m^mmmsi 



Foy^ the Soy.tJiern States. 



41 




Large White Solid Celery 



r. V^tinto trenches about four inches 
"'"^^deep, nine wide, and two and a 
-^ half feet apart, made very rich 
by digging in rotten manure. 
Plants should be from 6 to 8 
inches apart. When planted out 
during the hot months, the 
trenches require to be shaded, 
which is generally done by 
spreading cotton cloth over 
them ; lantauais will answer the 
same purpose. Celery requires 
plenty of moisture, and watering 
with soapsuds, or liquid manure, 
will benefit the plants a great 
deal. AYhen tall enough it 
should be earthed up to blanch 
to make it fit for the table. 

I^arg^e White §olid is the 

variety mostly grown. Is white, 
solid and crisp. 

Celeriac or X'tirnip-Root- 
ccl Celery, is very jDopular in 
some parts of Europe, but hardly 
cultivated here. It should be 
sown in the fall of the year, and 
transplanted six inches apart, in 
rows one foot apart. When the 
roots have obtained a good size, 
they are boiled, scraped oft", 




("eleriac, or Turuii)-I!o()K'<l Celery. 



42 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 




sliced and dressed with vinegar, 
etc., as a salad. 

Dwarf jLargfe Ribbecl. 

This kind was brought here sev- 
eral 3'ears ago from France. It 
is short, but very thick-ribbed, 
solid and of fine flavor. The 
best dwarf variety for this sec- 
tion. 

Celery for Soup. This is 
sown in the spring of the year, 
broad-cast, to be used for sea- 
soning, the same as Parsley. 

CHERVIL. 

Cerfeuil (Fr.), Keebelkraut 
(Ger). 
An aromatic plant, used a 
good deal for seasoning, espe- 
cially in oyster soup, and is of- 
ten cut between Lettuce when 
served as a salad . In the North 
this vegetable is very little 
known, but in this section there 
is hardly a garden where it is DAvarf, Large Ribbed. (New.) 

not found. Sow broad-cast during fall for winter and spring, and in 
January and February for summer use. 

COLLARDS. 

A kind of cabbage which does not head, but the leaves are used 
the same as other cabbage. Not so popular as in former years, and 
very little planted in this vicinity. 

CORN SALAD. 

Mache, Doucet (Fr.), Acker Salat (Ger.), Yalerr^xa (Sp.). 

Broad-leaved Corn Salad is the variety generall}' cultivated. It is 
used as salad during the winter and early spring months. Should 
be sown broad-cast during fall and winter, or in drills nine inches 
apart. 

corn-Indian. 

Mais (Fr.), Welschkorn (Ger.), Maiz (Sp.). 

Extra Early Dwarf Sugar. Large White Flint. ' - 

Adam's Extra Early. Blunt's Prolific Field. 

Early Sugar or Sweet. Improved Leaming. 

Stowel's Evergreen Sugar. _ Golden Beauty. 

Golden Dent Gourd Seed. Champion White Pearl. 

Early Yellow Canada. Mosby's Prolific 

Plant in hills about three feet apart, drop four to five seeds and 
thin out to two or three. Where the ground is strong the Adam's 



For the Southern States. 



48 



Extra Early and Crosby's Sugar can be planted in hills two and a half 
feet apart, as these two varieties are more dwarfish than the other 
varieties. Plant for a succession from February to June. 

Extra Early, or Crosby's Dwarf Siig^ar. This is a very 
early variety and of excellent quality. Ears small, but very tender. 
It is not so extensively planted as it deserves to be. 

Adam's Extra Early, the most popular variety with market 
gardeners for first planting. It has no fine table qualities, but as it 
grows to a good size, and is matured in about forty days from time of 
planting, it meets with ready sale in the market, and for these reasons 
gardeners prefer it. 

Early Sug-ar, or ISaw Eug'lancl. A long eight-rowed variety, 
which succeeds the Extra Early kinds. Desirable variety. 

Stowel's Evergreen Siig-ar. This is the best of all Sugar 
Corn. It is an early Corn, but the ears are of large size, and are 
well filled. It remains green longer than any other variety, a) id is 
quite productive. The cultivation of this excellent cereal, as well as 
all other Sugar Corn, is much neglected, yet why i3eople will plant 
common field-corn for table use, considering size instead of quality, I 
cannot understand. 




Extra Early Sugar Corn. Earlv Su| 



or New En,2:lanfl Corn. Ea crsreen Susj^ar Corn. 



Oolden Dent Oourd Seed. A field variety which is very pro- 
ductive at the North. It makes a very fine Corn South, but has to be 
planted here several years in succession before it attains perfection, 
as during the first year the ears are not well covered by the husk, as 



44 



Pdcliard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



it is the ease with all Northern varieties. When selected and planted 
here for a fe\Y years, it becomes acclimated and makes an excellent 
Corn, with large, fine ears, grain deep and cob of medium size. 

Early Tellow Canada. A long, eight-rowed variety. ]t is 
very early, and is i)lanted in both the field and garden. It does well 
here. 

L.ar^c l*Vliite Flint. A very popular variety with gardeners 
and amateurs. It is planted here for t^ble use principally, but, like 
the Golden Dent, makes an excellent variety for field culture after it 
has been iDlanted here for two or three years. 

Blunt':^ Prolific Field Corn. This is a very excellent variety, 
either for the field or for the table. It is very prolific, producing from 
four to six ears of corn. They are of medium size, but well filled and 
heavy. It is second early. This variety has done better than any 
other, and, being of Southern origin, it seems to be better adapted to 
our climate. I recommend it as an earlv vielding Corn . 




Improved Learning. 

lmi>rovcd JLeaniing:. An extra early variety, sold by me for 
tho first time three years ago. It is not hard and flinty, but sweet and 



For the Southern States. 



45 




:> ^^\ j^ ^\.,\a^\ 



(, olden Bl iut\ ( on 



nutritious, making excellent feed and fine meal. The ears are large 
and handsome, with dee[), large grains, deep orange color and small 
red cob. It is very productive. The shucks cover the ear better than 
any Northern or Western variety I have ever tried. It is adapted to 



46 



BicJiard D^otschers Ahnanac and Garden Manual 



a variety of soils, and produces well on heavy 
shown itself as verv reliable. 



or lisbt soil : it has 



Oolcleii Beauty, This variety is the handsomest of all yellow 
corn : the ears arej^f a perfect shape, long, and filled out to the ex- 
treme end of the cob. The grains are not of a flinty type, neither are 
They so soft as to be greatly shriveled, as in the Golden Dent. Golden 
Beauty matures early, ripening in eighty days from planting, and sur- 
passes all in size and beauty of grain. - 

Cbaiupioii White Pearl. This is a very handsome white 
corn. The grain is pure white, exceedingly heaw;.- and long, two of 
which will span the cob. which is small. Being medium in size of 
stalk it can be planted much thicker than a large Corn, and. at the 
same time, bear a full sized ear. The originator has established in 
Champion White Pearl Corn a short, thick stalk, with the ear grow- 
ing low upon it, which is an advantage in stormy weather. 




ChaBipion White Pearl Corn. 

?lo$by*s Prolific Corn. This is a Southern Corn, and is re- 
commended for general crop. The originator of this variety says : 
■' This corn is a cross between two widely different varieties. It is 
purely white, small cob, deep, full grain, neither too hard nor too 
soft. It will stand crowding in the drill as close again as any other 
variety. Ears of medium size, but long. It stands the drought better 
than ordinary corn." 

I sold a large quantity of this corn for seed the past year, and 
have found it to do better than any other White Corn I ever saw planted 
in Louisiana. Eecommend it very highly. 



Used for salad duriu 
drills six inches apart. 



CRESS. 

Cresson (Tr.i. Keesse. iGer. •. Bereo 'Sp.^i, 

winter and spring. Sow broad-cast or in 



For the Southern Stales. 



Curlecl, or Popper Grass. Not mnch used in this soetion. 

Broatl-Ieaved. This variety is extensively enltivated for the 
market. It is sown from early fall to late spring. The leaves resem- 
ble Water Cress ; a variety which does not well succeed here. Is con- 
sidered a very wholesome dish. 



CUCUMBER. 

CoNCOMBRE (Fr.), GuKKE (Gcr.), Pepino (Sp.). 



Improved Ear.ly White Spine. 

Early Frame. 

Long Green Turkey. 



Early Cluster. 

Long Green White Spine. 

Gherkin, or Burr (for pickling). 



Cucumbers need a rich soil. Plant in hills from three to four feet 
apart; the hills should be made rich with well decomposed manure, 
and eight to ten seeds should be planted in each hill, and covered 
about one-half inch deep ; when well up, thin out to four plants in the 
hill. Hoe between the hills till the vines meet. When the spring is 
dry the plants have to be watered, else they do not keep in bearing 
long. They can be planted from March till July. A great many cu- 
cumbers are planted here in February, or even sooner, and are pro- 
tected by small boxes with a pane of glass on top. These boxes are 




Early Cluster. 



West India Gherkin. 



48 



Richard Frotscher's Almmiac and Garden Manual 



removed during the day, and put back in the evening. When days 
are cloudy and cold, the plants are kept covered. 

Iiiiprov'ed Early H^liite Spine. This is the most popular 
variety. It is of medium size, light green, covered with white spines, 
and turns white when ripe. The best variety for shipping. Of late 
years it is used by most gardeners for forcing as well as outdoor 
culture. It is very productive. 

Early Frame. Another early variety, but not so popular as 
the foregoing kind. It is deep green in color, but turns yellow very 
quickly ; therefore gardeners do not plant it much. 

Eoiig' Oreeii Tiirlsey. A long variety attaining a length of 
from fifteen to eighteen inches when well grown. Very fine and pro- 
ductive. 

Early Cluster. Early, short and prickly; it bears in clusters. 




Long Green White Spine Cucumber. 

Long^ Oreeii White Spine, or New Orleans Market. This 
is a variety selected from an imported forcing cucumber introduced 
by me. It is good for forcing or open ground ; very productive, keeps 
its green color, and has few vines. This variety can not be excelled 
for shipping, as it produces very perfect cucumbers .and but few 
culls; the largest growers of cucumbers for shipping about here 
plant none but this variety. It is quite different from the Long- 
White Spine offered by some. 

\%^est India Olierkin. This is an oval variety, small in size. 
It is used for i-ickling when young and tender. When grown to its 
full size it can be stewed with meat. In fact, this is the only use made 
of it about New Orleans. 



EGG-PLANT. 

Aubergine (Fr.), Eierpflanze (Ger. i, Berengena (Sp.). 

The seeds should be sown in hot-beds in the early part of January. 
When a couple of inches high they should be transplanted into an- 
other frame, so that the plants may become strong and robust. When 
warm enough, generally during March, the plants can be placed in 
the open ground, about two and a half feet apart. This vegetable is 
very popular in the South, and extensively cultivated. 

Earg-e Purple, or New Orleans Market. This is the only 
kind groAvn here ; it is large, oval in shape and of a dark purple color 
and vert productive. Southern grown seed of this, as of a good many 



Foi' the Southern States. 



49 





Large Purple Egg-Plant. 

other tropical or sub-tropical vegetables, is preferable to Northern 
seed, as it will germinate more readily, and the plant will last longer 
during the hot season. 

Early D\%"arf Oval. This variety is very early and productive ; 
the fruit is not so large as the New Orleans Egg-Plant, but equal in 
flavor. For market it will not sell as well as the former ; desirable for 
family garden. 

ENDIVE. 

Chicoree (Fr.), Endivien (Ger.), Endibia (Sp.). 

A salad plant which is very popular and much cultivated for the 
market, principally for summer use. It can be sown in drills a foot 
apart, and, when the plants are well up, thinned out till about eight 
inches apart. Or it can be sown broad-cast thinly and transplanted 
the same as Lettuce. When the leaves are large enough, -say about 
eight inches long, tie them up for l?lanching, to make them fit for the 
table. This can only be done in dry weather, otherwise the leaves are 
apt to rot. For summer use do not sow before the end of March, as, 
if sown sooner, the plants will run into seed very early. Sow for a 
succession during the 
spring and s \i m m e r 
months. For winter use 
sow in September and 
October. 

Oreen Ciiiled. Is 
the most desirable kind, 
as it stands more heat 
than the following sort, 
and is the favorite market 
variety. 

Extra Fine Curled. 
Does not grow quite so 
large as the foregoing,and 

is more apt to decay when there is a wet summer. Better adapted for 
winter. 

Broad-leaved, or Escarolle. Makes a fine salad wdien well 
grown and blanched, especially for summer. 

. .4 . . _ .. __ 




Cireeu Curled Endi 



Eichard troisclieri Ahnanac and Garden JIaniial 



KOHL-RAB!, OR TURNIP = ROOTED CABBAGE. 

Chou Xayet (Fr.), Kohl-Eabi (Ger.;, Col deXabo 'Sp. j. 
This vegetable is very popular ^ith the European population of 
this city, and largely cultivated here, It is used for soups, or pre- 
pared in the same manner as 
Cauliflower. For late fall and 
winter use it should be sown 
from the end of July till the 
middle of October; for spring 
use, during January and Febru- 
ary. When the young plants 
are one month old transplant 
them in rows one foot apart, and 
about the same distance in the 
rows. They also grow finely if 
sown broad-cast and thinned out 
when young, so that the plants 
are not too crowded: or, they 
may be sown in drills, and cul- 
tivated the same as Euta Bagas. 
Early Tl'liite Vienna, 
The finest variety of all, and the 
only kind I keep. It is early, 
forms a smooth bulb, and has 
few small leaves. The so-called 
large White or G-reen is not de- 
sirable. 




Early White ."irnna jvTiil-Puai/i. 




LEEK. 

Poieeau \Fr,.', Lauch (Ger.;, Pleeo sBp. l 
A species of Onion, highly esteemed for flavoring 
roups., Should.be sown broad-cast and transplanted, 
vhen about six to eight inches high, into rows a foot 
iiiart, and six inches apart in the rows. Should be 
planted at least four inches deep. They require to 
be well cultivated in order to secure large roots. 
Sow in October for winter and spring use, and in 
January and February, for summer- 

Large London Flag. --'Is the most desirable 
kind, and that most generally grown. 

Large "Carentan.- This is a new French va- 
riety which grows to a very large size. 

LETTUCE. 



Laitue '.Fr. . Latiich 
Eaely CaBba&e, op. White Buiter- 

head. 
Ii.iPEOVED Eoyal Cabbage. 
Eeown Dutch Cabbage. 



Ger. ', Lechuga <Sp.;. 
Deumhead Cabbage. 
White Paeis Coss. 

PEEPIG>'Ay. 

Impeoved Laege Passion. 



Lettuce is sown here during the whole year by the market gar- 
dener. Of course it takes a great deal of labor to produce this vege- 



For the Southern States. 



table during our hot summer months. For directions how to sprout 
the seed during that time, see •' Worlc for June." The richer and 
better the ground the larger the head will be. No finer Lettuce is 
grown anywhere else than in New Orleans during fall and spring. The 
seed should be sown broad-cast, and, when large enough, planted out 
in rows a foot apart, and from eight to ten inches apart in the rows. 
Some kinds grow larger than others ; for instance, Butterhead will not 
require as much space as Drumhead or Perpi-^-nan. 




sMiite Paris Coss Lettuce 



Perpigaan Lettuce- 




Early Cabfeag:e, or Wtiite Bwtterc 
An early variety, forming a solid head, but 
not quite so large as some others. It is the 
best kind for family use, to sow during fall 
and early spring, as it is very early and of " ^■^'^^m^'""^''^'^' 

good flavor. Early Cabbage, crWhite Butter. 

Iiiipi'ovecl Moyal Cabbai^e. This is the most popular variety 
in this State. Heads light green, of large size, and about two weeks 
later than the White Butter. It is very tender and crisp ; can be sown 
later in the spring than the foregoing kind, and does not run into 
seed so quickly. 

Brown Butch €abt»ag-e. Avery hardy kind, forms a solid 
head ; not so popular as many other kinds ; good for winter. 

Bruiiilaead Cabbag^e. An 

excellent spring variety, forming 
large heads, the outer leaves 
curled. 

WiBite Paris Coss, This 
is very popular with the New Or- 
leans market gardeners, as it is 
the favorite with the French po- 
pulation. It grows to perfection 
and forms large, fine heads, parti- 
oularly in the s]:»ringof'the year. 

Perpig-nan. A fine Ger- 
man varietv which forms large, 




^^^^^^ 



Drumhead Cabbage Lettuce 



Bichard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



light green heads, and which stands tlie heat better than tlie Eoyal. 
It is much cultivated for the market, as it thrives well when sown 
during the latter end of spring. 

'Improved Xarg-e Pa§<^ioii. This is a large Cabbage Lettuce 
introduced hy me from California ; it attains a large size, grows slowly, 
biit heads very hard. It does better here during late autumn and 
winter than in summer, as it cannot stand the heat. If sown late in 
the fall and transplanted during winter, it grows to very large heads, 
hard and firm. It is the kind shipped from here in the spring. 

ryiELON —Musk or CAXTZLorPE. 

Melon (Fr.), Melone (Ger.), Melox (Sp.). 

Netted Nutmeg. , Eaely White Japan. 

Netted Citron. Persian or Cassaba. 

Pine Apple. i New Orleans Market. 

Melons require a rich sandy loam. If the ground is not rich 
enough, a couple of shovels full of rotted manure should be mixed in- 
i to each hill, which ought to be from five to six feet apart ; drop ten or 
twelve seeds, and when the plants have two or three rough leaves, 
thin out to three or four plants. Canteloupes are cultivated very ex- 
tensively in the neighborhood of New Orleans ; the quality is very 
fine and far superior to those raised in the North. Some gardeners plant 
during February and cover with boxes, the same as described for Cu- 
cumbers. When Melons are ripening, too much rain will impair the 
flavor of the fruit. 

IVetted Nutmeg- Melon. Small oval melon, roughly netted, 
early, and of fine fla^-or. 

Netted Citron Caiiteioiipe. This variety- is larger than the 
foregoing kind ; it is more rounded in shape, of medium size and 
roughly netted. 

Pine Apple Cantelonpe. A medium sized early variety, oval 
in shape, and of very fine flavor. 

EarlyTf^liite Japan Cantelonpe. An early kind, of cream- 
ish white color, ver^" sweet, and of medium size. 

Persian or Cassaba. A large variety, of oval shape and deli- 
cate flavor. The rind of thi& kind' is" very thin, which is a disadvant- 
age in handling, and prevents it from being planted for the market. 
Yery fine for family use. 

New Orleans MarRet. A large species of the citron kind. It 
is extensively grown' for this market ; largein size, very roughly rLetted 
and of luscious flavor ; different altogether from the Northern Netted^ 
Citron, which is earlier, but not so fine in flavor, and not half the size 
of the variety grown here. The New Orleans Market cannot be ex- 
celled by any other variety in the world. In a favorable season it is a 
perfect gem. I have tried it alongside of varieties praised at the 
North, such as are brought out every year, — but none of them could 
compare with the New Orleans Market. As for some years past the 
seeds were scarce I had some grown North, but they lost their fine 



For tJie Southern States. 



53 




Note.— The above cut represents, the New Orleans Melon; it has been taken from a 
common specimen grown by one of my customers, who raises the seed of this variety 
for me. 

qualities, size and flavor. It requires a Southern sun to bring the seed 
to perfection. Small varieties of melons will improve in size if culti- 
vated here for a number of years, and if care is taken that no Cucum- 
bers, Squashes, Gourds or Pumpkin are cultivated in the vicinity. If 
the best and earliest specimens are selected for seed, in three or four 
years the fruit will be large and fine. 



melon-Water. 

Melon d'Eau (Fr.), Wassermelone (Ger.), Sandia (Sp.). 



Mountain Sweet. 
Mountain Sprout. 
Improved Gipsey. 
Ice-Cream (White seeded). 
Orange Water. 



]^ATTLE Snake. 
Cuban Queen. 
Mammoth Iron Clad. 
Pride of Georgia. 
KoLB Gem. 



Water Melon will grow and produce in places where Canteloupe 
will not do well. The soil for this plant should be light and sandy. 
Plant in hills about eight feet apart, eight to twelve seeds in a hill ; 
when the plants are well up thin out to three. The plants should be 
hoed often, and the ground between the hills kept clean till the vines 
touch. 

Mountain Sweet Water. This was once a very popular 
variety ; it is of oblong shape, flesh bright scarlet and of good flavor. 
It is very productive. 



rtiMMltMMMiiMiite 



54 Filchard. FroUcher's Almanac and Garden Manual 




Mountain ST^eet Water Melon. 




Mountain Sprout Melon. 




Improved Gipsey Melon. 

Moncitaiu SpB'oiit Tl^sater, This is similar in shape to the fore- 
going variety, but rather later. It is light green ^Yith irregular stripes 
of dark green, Flesh bright scarlet. 

Improved Gipsey. This is a lately introduced variety, which 
has come into general cultivation. It is very large, oblong, and of a 
dark green color, striped and mottled with light green. Flesh scarlet 
and of delicious flavor. This is without any exception the best market 
variety. 

Ice-cream. (White Seeded. ) A medium sized variety of excel- 
lent quality. It is early and very productive. Bemg thin in the rind 
it is not so well adapted for the market as the other kinds ; notwith- 
standing this, it is grown exclusively b3' some for that purpose, on ac- 
count of its earliness. It has come into general cultivation more and 
more everv year, as it is verv sweet, and sells readilv in the market. 



For the SoutJiern States. 



Orang^c Water. Quite a distinct variety from the others. The 
rind can be peeled off the same as the skin of an orange. It is of me- 
dium size, fair quality. Very little cultivated. 

Rattle Snake. An old Southern variety which has come into 
notice of late years. It is of large size, the green not qiMte so dark as 
the Gipsey, but the stripes larger ; fine market variety. It stands 
transportation better than most other kinds; has been the standard 
market variety till t-he Kolb's Gem was introduced. However, it al- 
ways will remain a favorite with market-gardeners. The seed I offer 
of this variety, is grown for me by one of the best growers in Georgia. 
It is of the purest strain that can be found. 

Cuban l^neen, A striped variety; highly recommended by 
Northern seedsmen ; said to reach from fifty to seventy pounds. 
Sweet and of delicate flavor ; it does not grow as large here as said it 
does North. 

Maiiiniotli lr$»n Clad. A nev*/- variety; highly recommended 
North. It did not do as well as Southern raised seed. I have the seed 
now grown in Florida, and, no doubt, will give better satisfaction. 

Pride of Georgia. A new Melon from Georgia, of excellent 
quality; attains a large size when well cultivated. A very good vari- 
ety for family use. 




56 



Fuclmrcl Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 




uiiiL'i.i j-i.'ii La...L Melon. 




Ivolb Gem Melon. 



The Kolb Gem. OdIv a few 3-ears since this variety has been 
introdiicecl, but the shipping qualities are so good, that the bulk of 
melons raised for the market are of that kind. Flesh crimson, very 
thin but tough rind: fine flavor and full of flesh, no hollow in the 
middle. It is the heaviest melon for its size. "\i^'hat I offer are Southern 
grown seeds, which stand the sun better and produce larger and more 
Melons than Northern grown seeds. 



For the Southern States. 



57 



MUSTARD. 

MoiTTAiiDE (Fr.), Senf (Ger.), Mostaza (Sp.)- 



White or Yellow Seeded. 
LarCtE- Leaved. 



Chinese very large Cabbage 
Leaved. 



This is grown to quite an extent in the Southern States, and is 
sown broad-cast during fall, winter and spring. It may be used the 
same as spinach, or boiled with meat as greens. The White or Yellow 
Seeded is very little cultivated, and is used chiefly for medical pur- 
poses, or pickling. The Large-leaved or Curled has black seed, a dis- 
tinct kind from the Northern or European variety. The seed is raised 
in Louisiana. It makes very large leaves ; cultivated more and more 
every year. 

Chinese Very L.aa'^e Cal>bage-L.eave<l. This is a European 
variety, with light green very large leaves. It has not the same taste 
as the large leaved or the large curled, but will stand longer before 
going to seed. 

NASTURTIUM. 

Capucine CFr.), Indianische Kresse (Ger.), Capuchina (Sp.). 
Tall, i Dwarf. 
Not cultivated here, except for ornament. 

OKRA. 

Green Tall Growing. | Dwarf Green. [ New Velvet. 
This is a highly esteemed vegetable in the South, and no garden, 
whether small or large, is without it. It is used in making "Gumbo," 




Tall Growing Okra. 



58 



Fiichar^d Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Jlamml 



a dish the Creoles of Louisiana know how to prepare better than any 
other nationality. It is also boiled in salt and water, and served with 
vinegar as a salad, and is considered a very wholesome dish. ■ Should 
not be planted before the ground is warm in spring as the seeds are 
apt to rot. Sow in drills, which ought to be two to three feet apart, 
and when up, thin out. and leave one or two plants every twelve or 
flfteen inches. 

Tali GrowiMg. This is the variety most cultivated here. The 
pods are long, round towards the end. and keep tender longer than 
the square podded kind. 

Dwarf Crreeii. This is a very early and prolific variety, and 
remains tender longer than any other. It has come into general cul- 
tivation, planted much more than the tall. It may be said here, that 
all dwarf varieties, when cultivated in this locality for some ye^rs. will 
grow taller everv vear. 




]¥eTr Velvet. A new variety ; dwarf, round, smooth pods, free 
from ridges and seams, and not prickly to the touch ; very prolific and 
early. I tried this variety the last two years, and sold a good deal of 
the seed last year. It has come up to what is claimed for it. I re- 
commend it to all who have not tried it. 



ONION. 

0(3^-o^- (Fr.), Zwiebel (Ger.), Cebolla iSp.i. 
Creole. ; Xew Queev. 
The Onion is one of the most important vegetables, and is 
grown to a large extent in Louisiana. It is one of the surest crops 
to be raised, and always sells. Thousands of barrels are shipped in 
Spring from here to the Western and Northern States. There is one 
peculiar feature about raising Onions here, and that is, they can 
only be raised from Southern, or so-called Creole seed. No seed from 
North, West, or any part of Europe, will produce a merchantable Onion 
in the South. When the crop of Creole seed is a failure, and they are 
scarce, they will bring a good ]:'rice, having been sold as high as ten 



For the Southern States. 



dollars a pound, when at the same tiaie Northern seed could be had for 
one-fourth of that price. Northern raised seed can be sown to be used 
green, but as we have Shall(>ts here which grow during the whole 
autumn and winter, and multiply very rapidly, the sowing of seed for 
green Onions is not profitable. Seed ought to be sown from the middle 
of September to the end of October; if sown sooner, too many will 
throw up seed stalks. When the month of September has been dry 
and hot, the beds w^here the seed are sown ought to be covered with 
moss. Where this cannot be had, palmettos can be used, but they 
should be taken off in the evening and replaced in the morning. When 
the seed are w^ell up, this is no longer necessary, but watering should 
be continued. —They are generally sown broad-cast, and when the 
size of a goose quill should be transplanted into rows one to two feet 
apart, and about five inches in the rows. Onions are different, in re- 
gard to rotation, from other vegetables. They do best if raised on the 
same ground for a succession of years. The price of Onions has been 
good, and it is expected to be equally as good next spring. The crop 
of seed has been very good for the last two years, which will enable 
me to have a good lot sown for sets next January ; an article I never 
could get in sufficient quantity to supply the demand. If sets are 
planted out, they will produce large size Onions much earlier than 
seed sown in the fall-— 




Louisiana or Creole Onion. 

XiOUJisiana or Creole Onioai. This is generally of a light red 
color, darker than the Strassburg, and lighter in color than the Weth- 
ersfield. The seed I have been selling, of this kind, for a number of 
years, has been raised on Bayou Lafourche, and has never failed to 
make line large Onions. 

The crop of Creole Onion seed having failed some years ago, I sold 
a good deal of Italian seed, and had ample opportunity to see the re- 
suits. The Giant Eocca I have discarded ; it takes too long to bulb 
and is very spongy. The Bermuda and Ked Tripoli have done fairly, 
but the Onions do not mature as early as the Creole, and do not keep 
so well, although attaining a very large size, and more so the Bermuda. 



60 Bichard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 

They are of mild flavor, and well adapted to be used up in spring ; but 
I would not recommend them to be raised for shipping, except the 
White Queen. 

NEW ITALIAN ONIONS. 

NeT*" Queen. This is a medium sized, white variety from Italy, 
very early and flat; can be sown as late as February, and good sized 
bulbs will yet be obtained. It is of mild flavor and very fine when 
boiled and dressed for the table. -It can not be too highly recom- 
mended. 

SHALLOTS. 

ECHALLOTTE (Fr.), SCHALOTTEN (Gcr.). 

A small sized Onion which grows in clumps. It is generally grown 
-in the South, and used in its green state for soups, stew, etc. There 
are two varieties, the Ked and White ; the latter variety is the most 
popular. In the fall of the year the bulbs are divided and set out in 
rows a foot apart, and four to six inches in the rows. They grow and 
multiply very fast, and can be divided during winter, and set out again. 
Late in spring, when the tops become dry, they have to be taken up, 
thoroughly dried, and stored in a dry airy place. 

PARSLEY. 

Persil (Fr.), Petersilie (Ger.), Perjil (Sp.). 

Plain Leaved. j Improved Garnishing. 

Double Curled ' 

Parsley can be sown during the fall from August to October, and 
during spring, from the end of January to the end of April. It is 
generally sown broad-cast. 

Plain L.eavecl. This is the kind raised for the New Orleans 
market. 

Double Cui'led. The leaves of this variety are curled. It has 
the same flavor as the other kind, but is not so popular. 

Improved Oarnisliing-. This is the best kind to ornament a 
dish ; it has the same flavor as the other kinds. 

PARSNIP. 

Panais (Fr.), Pastinake (Ger.), Pastinaca (Sp.) 

Hollow Crown, or Sugar. 

Should be sown in deep, mellow soil, deeply spaded, as "the roots 
are long, in drills twelve to eighteen inches apart; when the plants 
are three inches high thin out to three inches apart in the row. Sow 
from September to November for winter, and January to March for 
spring and summer crops. 

The Hollow Crown, or 8ug^ar, is the kind generally culti- 
vated ; it possesses all the good qualities for which other varieties are 
recommended. 



For the Sontliern States. (U 

PEAS. 

Pois (Tr.), Erbse (Ger.), Guisante Sp.) 
EARLIEST. 



Extra Early, or First and Best, 

2^ feet. 
Early Washington, 3 feet. 



Early Tom Thumb, 1 foot. 
Laxton's Alpha, 8 feet. 
American Wonder, (new, ) 1| feet. 



SECOND CROP. 



Bishop's Dwarf Lokg Pod, 1^ ft. 
Champion of England, 5 feet. 
McLean's Advancer, 3 feet. 



McLean's Little Gem, 1^ feet. 
Laxton's Prolific Long Pod, 3 ft. 
Eugenie, 3 feet. 



GENERAL CROP. 



Dwarf Blue Imperial, 3 feet. 
Royal Dwarf Marrow, 3 feet. 
Black Eyed Marrowfat, 4 feet. 



Large White Marrowfat, 4 feet. 
Dwarf Sugar, 2| feet. 
Tall Sugar, 6 feet. 



Peas are a fine vegetable, and therefore are very generally culti- 
vated. It is best to plant in ground manured the previous year, else 
they will make more vines than peas. As a general thing the "dwarf 
kinds require richer ground than the tall growing varieties. Marrow- 
fat Peas planted in rich ground will not bear well, but they produce 
finely in sandy light soil. 

The Extra Early, Tom Thumb, or Laxton's Alpha will not produce 
a large crop without being in rich ground. Peas have to be planted 
in drills two inches deep and from two to three feet apart, according 
to the height they may grow. Tom Thumb can be planted- one foot 
apart, whereas W^hite Marrowfat or Champion of England require 
three feet. The Extra Early, Alpha and Tom Thumb can be planted 
during August and September for fall. During November and Decem- 
ber we plant the Marrowfats ; January and February, as late as March, 
all kinds can be planted, bat for the latter month only the earliest 
varieties should be used, as the late varieties will get mildewed before 
they bring a crop. Peas will bear much better if some brush or rods 
are stuck in the drills to support them, except the very dwarf kinds. 

Extra, Early, or First and Best. This is the earliest Pea cul- 
tivated ; very popular with the small market gardeners here, who have 
rich grounds. It is very productive and good flavored. The stock I 
sell is as good as any sold in' the country, not surpassed by any, no 
matter whose name is put before "Extra Early." 

Early lIVashinstOHj Early May or Frame, which are all 
nearly the same thing ; is about ten days later than the Extra Early. 
It is very productive, and keeps longer in bearing than the foregoing 
kind. Pods a little smaller. Very popular about New Orleans. 

Tom Tliunib. Very dwarfish and quite productive. Can be culti- 
vated in rows a foot apart ; requires no branches or sticks. 

Eaxton's Alpha. This is a variety of recent introduction ; it 
is the earliest wrinkled variety in cultivation ; of delicious flavor and 
very prolific. This variety deserves to be recommended to all who 



Richard Froischers Almanac and Garden Manual 



like a first-class pea. It will come into general cultivation when bet- 
ter known, 

American T^'oiider. i New.) A wrinkled pea of dwarf growth, 
10 to 12 inr^hes ; It is prolific, early and of fine quality ; it comes in af- 
ter the Extra Early. 

Bi§hop-s Dwarf ioug Podc An early dwarf variety, very 
stout and branching; requires no sticks, but simply the earth drawn 
round theToots. It is very productive and of excellent quality. 

Cliaiiipioii of Euslaiid. A 

green, wrinkled variety of very 
fine flavor; not profitable for the 
market, but recommended for fa= 
mily use. 

?IcL<eaii'S Advancer^ This 

is another green, wrinkled variety, 
about two weeks earlier than the 

foregoing kind. 

;!IcLeau-s JLittlc Geoi. A 

dwarf, wrinkled variety, of recent 
introduction. It is early, very pro- 
lific and of excellent flavor. Re- 
quires no sticks, 

Laxtou-s Prolific Losig Foclc 

A green marrow pea of go:-;! 'Jiuiii- 
ity. Pods are long and well filled. 
It is second early, and can be re- 
commended for the use of market 
gardeners, being very prolific 

fiugeuie. A white wrinkled 
variety, of fine flavor ; it is of the 
same season as the Advancer. Can- 
not be too highly recommended for 
family use. 

Dwarf Bine Imperial. A 

very good bearer if planted early 
pods are large and well filled. 

Royal Dwarf Marrow. 

Similar to the large Marrowfat, 
but of dwarf habit. 




Extra Early, or First and Best. 



Black Eyed Marrowfat. This kind is planted moTefor.the 
market than any other. It is very productive, and when young, quite 
tender. Grows about four feet high. 

L-arg-e "White Marrovrfat. Similar to the last variety, except 
that it grows about two feet taller, and is less productive. 

Dwarf §iisrar. A variety of which the whole pod can be used 
after the string is drawn off from the back of the pod. Three feet 
hi^-h. 



For the Southern States. G3 



Tall Siig°ai'. Has the same qualities as the foregoing kind, only 
grows taller, and the pods are somewhat larger. Neither of these two 
varieties are very popular here. 

THE PEA BUG. 

All peas grown near Philadelphia have small holes in them, caused 
by the sting of the Pea Bug, while the pod is forming, when it deposits 
its egg in it. Later the insect perfects itself and comes out of the dry 
pea, leaving the hole. 

The germ of the pea is never destroyed, and they grow equally as 
well as those without holes. Market gardeners in this neighborhood 
who have been planting the Extra Early Peas for years, will not take 
them without holes, and consider these a trade mark. 

FIELD OR COW PEAS. 

There are a great many A^arieties of Cow Peas, different in color 
and growth. They are planted mostly for fertilizing purposes, and 
are sown broad-cast ; when in a good stand, and of sufficient height, 
they are plowed under. The Clay Pea is the most jjopular. There 
are several varieties called crowders, v/hich do not grow as tall as the 
otherS; but produce a great many pods, which are used green, the 
same as snap-beans, and if dried, like dried beans, make a very good 
dish. The crowders are of an oblong shape, almost pointed at one 
end ; they are on an average larger than the other Field Peas, Lady 
Peas are small, white, with a black eye ; they are generally planted 
between corn, so that they can run up on it. Dry, they are considered 
the very best variety for cooking- 

PEPPER. 

PiME^T (Fr.), Spanischer Pfeffer (Ger.l, Pimento (Sp.). 



Bell or Bull Nuse. 
Sweet Spanish Monstrous. 
Sweet Ruby King. 
New Golden Daw^n Mango, 



Long Red Cayenne. 
Red Cherry. 
Bird Eye. 
Chili or Tabasco. 



Peppers are tender and require to be raised in the liot^jed. Seed 
should be sown in January, and when large enough transplanted into 
the ground in rows from one aiid a half to two feet apart, and a foot 
to a foot and a half in the rows. There are more Peppers raised here 
than in other sections of the country; the hot varieties are used for 
seasoning and making pepper sauce; the mild variety is highly es- 
teemed for salad. Care should be taken not to grow different kinds 
close together, as they mix very readily. 

Sweet Spanish, or IVIoiistroiis. A very iDopular variety, much 
cultivated. It is very mild, grows to a large size, tapering towards the 
end, and, when green, is used as a salad. Superior for that purpose 
to any other kind. 

S^veet Pepper, Ruby Kills'^ This variety grows to a larger 
size than the Sweet Spanish Monstrous, and is of different shape. The 



64 



Bicharcl Frotsclier's Almanac and Garden Manual 



fruit is from 5 to 6 inches long by about 3 to 4 inches in diameter, and 
of a bright red color. It is remarkably mild and pleasant in flavor, 
and can be sliced and eaten as a salad, the same as the Spanish Mon- 
strous. Single plants ripen from 8 to 10 fruits, making this variety 
both productive and profitable. A decided acquisition. 




Sweet Spanish or ^Mon^trous Pej^per 



weet Peppei 



This new sweet pepper attracted 
much attention last season, and was admired b}- all vvho saw it. I be- 
lieve it to be all the originator claims for it. In shape and size it re- 
sembles the Bell. Co] ov, a bright waxy golden yellow; very brilliant 
and handsome. Single plants ripen from twelve to twenty-four fruits, 





Pvecl Cherry Pepper 



Long Red Cayenne Pepper. 



For the Southern States. 65 



making them productive and profitable. They are entirely exempt 
from any fiery taste or flavor, and can be eaten as readily as an apple. 

Bell or Bull Nose. Is a large oblong variety which is not sweet 
or mild, as thought by some. The seeds are very hot. Used for pick- 
ling. 

JLong: Red Cayenne. Is very hot and jningent. Cultivated 
here and used for pepper sauce and seasoning purposes. There are 
two varieties ; one is long and straight, and the other like shown in 
cut, which is the only kind I keep. 

Red Cherry. A small roundish variety, very hot and productive. 

Bird Eye. Small, as the name indicates. It is very hot and 
used principally for pepper vinegar. 

Chili or Tabasco. A small variety, from three-fourths t(> an 
inch long. It is strong, and used for pepper sauce more than any 
other sort. 

POTATOES. 

PoMME DE Terre (Fr.), Kartoffel (Ger.). 

Early Kose. | Snowflake. 

Breese's Peerless. ' Beauty of Hebron. 

EussETS. I White Elephant. 

Extra Early Vermont. I Eural Blush. 

Potatoes thrive and produce best in a light, dry but rich soil. 
Well decomposed stable manure, is the best, but, if it cannot be had, 
cotton seed meal, bone dust, or any other fertilizer should be used to 
make the ground rich enough. If the ground was planted the fall 
previous with Cow Peas, which were i)lowed under, it will be in good 
condition for Potatoes. Good sized tubers should be selected for 
planting, which can be cut in pieces not too small ; each piece ought 
to contain at least three eyes. Plant in drills from two to three leet 
apart, according to the space and how to be cultivated afterwards. 
For field culture, two and a half to three feet apart; for garden, two 
feet will answer. We plant potatoes here from end of December to 
end of March, but the surest time is about the first of February. If 
planted early they should be planted deeper than if planted late, and 
hilled up as they grow. If potatoes are planted shallow and not hilled 
soon, they will suffer more, if caught by a late frost, than if planted 
deep and hilled up well. Early potatoes have not the same value here 
as in the North, as the time of planting is so long, and very often the 
first planting gets cut down by a frost, and a late planting, which may 
just be peeping through the ground, will escape and produce in ad- 
vance of the first planted. A fair crop of potatoes can be raised here 
if planted in August ; if the autumn is not too dry they will bring nice 
tubers by end of November. They should not be cut if planted at this 
time of the year, but planted whole. They should be put in a moist 
l^lace before planting, so they may sprout. The early varieties are 
preferable for this time of planting. 

I have been handling several thousand barrels of potatoes every 
season for planting, and make Seed-Potatoes a specialty. The potatoes 



66 



I sell are Eastern grown, which, as every one interested in potato 
culture knows, are superior and preferable to Western grown. 

I have tried and introduced all new kinds here ; but of late so 
many have come out that it is almost impossible to keep up with 
them. New varieties of potatoes come out with fancy prices, but these 
prices for new potatoes do not pay here, as we can keep none over for 
seed, and any person raising for the market would not realize a cent 
more for a new fancy variety per barrel, than for a barrel of good 
Peerless or Early Rose. Earliness is' no consideration, as we plant 
from December to end of March. Somebody may plant Early Eose 
in December and another in February, and those planted in February 
come to the market first ; it depends entirely upon the season. If 
late frosts set in, early planted potatoes will be cut down, and those 
just coming out of the ground will not be hurt. The Jackson White 
has given but little satisfaction the last four years, except in cases 
vvdiere planted very early. The yield was very good, but the quality 
poor and very knotty. Perhaps this was the fault of the season. It 
is hardly planted any more for the market. Up to now the Peerless 
is the standard variety. Among the new kinds I have tried, I find 
the White Elephant to be a fine potato. It is a very strong grower, 
tubers oblong, very productive, good quality and flavor. It is late, and 
will come in at the end of the season if planted with the earlier varie- 
ties. The Extra Early Vermont, Beauty of Hebron, Snowflake and 
Early Eose for early, and Peerless and White Elephant for late, are 
as good varieties as exist, and it is not likely that we will have anything 
better by new introductions. Most people are not careful enough in 
selecting their seed. Some of the potatoes sold in this market for 
seed are not fit for planting. 

Early Rose. This is, without any doubt, the best potato for the 
table. It is oval, very shallow-eyed, pink-skinned, very dry, and 
mealy when boiled. It has not become so popular as it deserves as a 
market variety, as pink or red potatoes do not sell so well here as the 
white kinds. This variety should not be planted too soon, from the 
fact that they make small stalks, and if cut down by frost, they suffer 
more than other varieties. No better potato for family use. Every 
one who plants potatoes ought to plant some of this variety, but they 
want rich, light soil to grow to perfection. 

Breese's Peerless. Thirteen 3 ears ago this variet3- was 
introduced, yet at in^esent it is the leading variety for market as well as 
for family use. Skin dull white, sometimes slightly russetted ; eyes 
few and shallow, round, occasionally oblong ; grows to a large size ; 
very productive and earlier than the Jackson White. As white pota- 
toes are more salable than pinkish kinds, and as this variety is hand- 
some in appearance, and of good quality, it has become the general 
favorite in this section. 

Raissets, This kind is still planted by some. It is round, red- 
dish and slightly russetted. Eyes deep and many. Very productive, 
but not so fine a quality as some others. Does best in sandy soil, such 



Fo7^ the Southern States. 



fi7 



as we have along the lake coast. If the season is dry it will do well, 
but in a wet season, this variety will rot quicker than any other. 

Extra £arly Vermont. Very similar to the Early Rose, but 
of a stronger growth; a little earlier, and the tubers are more uni^ 
form and larger. It is an excellent table variety. 

Siiowllake. This is a very early variety. Tubers good medium 
size ; elongated, very uniform and quite productive. Eyes flat on the 
body of the tuber, but compressed on the seed end. Skin white, flesh 
very fine grained, and when boiled, snow-white. 

Beauty of Hel>- 
I'on. I have tried 
this variety t h o r - 
oughly, and found 
it in every particular 
as has been repre- 
sented. It is earlier 
than the Early Eose, 
which resembles it 
very much, being a 
little lighter and 
more russetted in 
color. It is very pro- 
ductive and of excel- 
lent table quality; 
more mealy than the 
Early Eose, but 
smaller. 

White Elephant. 

This variety has 
again given entire 
satisfaction the past 
season. The tubers 
are large and of ex- 
c e 1 1 e n t quality; 
planted alongside of 
the Peerless, it pro- 
duced fully one third 
more than that ;va- 
riety. 

Knral Blush. 

Second early, tubers 
roundish flattened, 
blush skin, flesh 
slighted with pink. 
Very dry and of ex- 
cellent quality. A 
heavv vielder. 




Extra Early Vermo.nt. 



I 



68 



Richard Frotsclier' s Almanac and Garden Manual 




S]U)\vllaki 



THE SWEET POTATO. 

ConvoJriilus batatas. 

The Sweet Potato is next to corn the most important food crop in 
the South. They are a wholesome and nutritious diet, good for man 
and beast. Though cultivated to a limited extent on the sandy lands 
of New Jersey and some of the middle States, it thrives best on the 
light rich lands of the South, which bring their red and golden fruits 
to greatest perfection under the benign rays of a southern sun. It is a 
i:)lant of a warm climate, a child of the sun, much more nutritious than 
the Irish Potato on account of the great amount of saccharine matter 
it contains, and no southern table should be found without it from the 
first day of August till the last day of May. Some plant early in 
spring the potato itself in the prepared ridges, and cut the vine from 
the, potato when large enough, and plant them out ; others start the 
potatoes in a bed prepared expressly Cor that purpose, and slip off the 
sprouts as they come up, and set these out. The latter method will 
produce the earliest potatoes; others who set out the vines, say that 
they make the largest tubers. In prei>aring the land the soil should 
be thoroughly pulverized, the ridges laid offabout five feet ai)art, well 
drawn up and rather flat on top. If every thing is ready, and time for 
planting has arrived, do not wait for a rain, make a paste of clay and 
cow manure; in this dip the roots of the slips and press the earth 
firmly around them. Old slips are more tenacious of life than young- 
ones, and will under these circumstances answer best. Watering 
afterwards, if dry weather continues, of course, will be beneficial. 
Otherwise plant your vines or slips just before or after a rain. Two 
feet apart in the row is considered a good distance. The ridges 
should never be disturbed by a plow from the time they are made 
until the potatoes are ready to be dug. 



For the Southern States. 69 



Scrape off the grass and young weeds with the hoe, and pull up the 
larg-e ones by hand. Crab grass is peculiarly inimical to the sweet 
potato, and should be carefully kept out of the patch. The vines 
should never be allowed to take root between the rows. Sweet pota- 
toes should be dug before a heavy frost occurs ; a very light one will 
do no harm. The earth should be dry enough to keep it from sticking 
to the potatoes. The old fashioned potato bank is the best arrange- 
ment for keeping them, the main points being a dry place and venti- 
lation. 

Varieties generalhj cultivated in the South. 

Tlie Yam. Taking into consideration quality and productive- 
ness, the Yam stands at the head of the list. Frequently, when baked, 
the saccharine matter in the shape of candy will be seen hanging to 
them in strings. Skin and flesh yellow, and very sweet. Without a 
doubt, the best potato for family use. 

Soutliern <^uceii. Very similar to the former, but smoother, 
the tubers having no veins or very few ; it is earlier. 

Sliang:liai or California l^am. This is the earliest variety 
we have, frequently, under favorable circumstances, giving good 
sized tubers tAvo months after planting the vine. Very productive, 
having given 300 bushels per acre when planted early, and on rich 
land. Is almost the only kind cultivated for the New Orleans-market. 
Skin dull white or yellow, flesh white, dry and mealy, in large speci- 
mens frequently stringy. 

There are some other varieties of Sweet Potatoes highly i^rized in 
the West, but not appreciated here. The Eed and Yellow Nanse- 
mond are of a line quality and productive, but will not sell so well as 
the California Yam when taken to market. For home consumption 
they are fine, and deserve to be cultivated. 

PUMPKIN. 

PoTiRON (Fr.), KiiRBiss (Ger.), Calabaza (Sp.). 

Kentucky Field. I Cashaw Ceook Neck. 

Large Cheese. ' Golden Yellow Mammoth. 

Are generally grown in the field, with the excei)tion of the Ca- 
shaw, which is planted in the garden ; but great care must be taken 
not to plant them close to Squashes or Melons, as they will mix and 
spoil their quality. Plant in hills from eight to twelve feet apart. 

Kentucky Field. Large round, soft shell, salmon color; very 
productive ; best for stock. 

Larg-e Clieese. This is of a bright orange, sometimes salmon 
color, fine grained, and used for thetable or for stock feeding. 

Casliaw" (Crook IVeck.) This is very extensively cultivated in 
the South for table use. There are tw^o kinds, one all yellow, and the 
other green striped with light yellow color. The latter is the prefer- 
able kind ; the flesh is fine grained, yellow and very sweet. It keeps 
well. This variety takes the place here of the Winter Squashes, which 
are verv little cultivated. 



Eichard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 




GoldeiL Yellow Mammotli. 

Ooldeu Yellow lYlaiUiuotta. This is a very large Pumpkin. 
Flesh and Skin are of a bright golden yellow color, fine grained and 
of good quality. I had some brought to the store weighing one hun- 
dred to one hundred and fifty pounds, raised on land which was not 
manured or fertilized. 

RADISH. 

Eadies, Eave iFr.'. Eadies. Eettig (Ger.'. EABA^'o (Sp.). 

Scarlet Hale Loxg FEE^'CH. 
Scarlet Oliye-shaped, White- 
tipped OR Feexck Breakfast. 
Black Spa>>'ish ( Winter j. 
Chinese Eose (Winter). 



Early Lox& Scarlet. 
Early Scarlet Turxip. 
Golden Globe. 
Early Scarlet Olive-shaped. 
White Summer Tuenip. 



This is a very popular vegetable, and grown to a large extent. 
The ground for radishes should be rich and mellow. The earh' small 
varieties can be sown broad-cast among other crops, such as beets, 
peas, spinach, or where lettuce has been transplanted. Early varie- 
ties are sown in this section the whole year, but during summer they 
require frequent watering to make them grow quickly. The Golden 
Globe and White Summer Turnip are best for planting during the 
summer months. The Half Long Scarlet French is the only red kind 
raised for the Xew Orleans market, and all the other cities in the United 
States taken together do not use as many of that one variety as Xew 
Orleans does. I have sold nearly two thousand pounds of the seed 
per annum for the last twelve years. 

Early Long: Scarlet. This is a very desirable variety ; it is of a 
bright scarlet color, short top and ^ery brittle. 

Early Scarlet Tnriiip. A small, round variety, the favorite 
kind for family use. It is very early, crisp and mild when young. 

Golden Globe. This stands the heat better than the foregoing 
kinds. It is-of an oblong .s-hape, and of a beautiful bright yellow color. 



For the Southern Stateti. 



71 



It should be sown very thinly. Best adapted for summer and fall 
sowing. The variety I keep is of the finest strain, and as good as any 
ever sold. 

£arly ;.ScarIet,.OIive-sliape€l. This is similar to the Half 
Long French, but shorter, and not quite so bright in color. It ib 
early and of good quality. Top short. 

liVIiite §iiiniiicr Turnip. This is a summer and fall variety. 
Oblong in shape, skin white, stands the heat well, but not much used. 





\i 



Earlv Long Scarlet. 




Scarlet Half Long French. 



EarlV Scarlet Turnip. 



72 



Bichard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Scarlet Half Long: Fi-encli. This is the most popular Eadish 
for the marl<et. It is of a bright scarlet color, and when well grown, 
from two to three inches long, very brittle and tender. 

Scarlet Olive-shaped, White tipped, or French Break.fast. 

A handsome Eadish of the same shape as the foregoing kind, with 
end and root white. Quite tender. 

BlacR Spanish. (Winter.) This is sown during fall and early 
winter. It is oval in shape, very solid, and stands considerable cold 
weather without being hurt. It can be sown broad-cast between 
Turnips, or planted in rows a foot apart, and thinned out from three 
to four inches in the rows, 

Chinese Rose. (Winter.) This is of a half long shape, bright 
rose color. It is as hardy as the last described kind, but not so popu- 
lar. 

R Q U E T T E. 

EOQUETTE (Fr.). 

Sown from September to March. It is used as a salad, resembling 
the Cress in taste. 

SALSIFY, OR Oyster Plant. 

Salsifis (Fr.), Haferwurzel (Ger.), Ostra Vegetal (Sp.). 

A vegetable which ought to be more cul- 
tivated than it is. It is prepared in different 

^ "MilMSBil^^ ways. It partakes of the flavor of oysters. 

\>S'^^KIMm^M'^f^ It should be sown in the fall of the year ; not 
later than November. The ground ought to 
be manured the spring previous, deeply 
spaded up, and well pulverized. Sow in drills 
about ten inches apart, and thin out from 
three to four inches in the rows. 

SPINACH. 

Epinard (Fr.), Spinat (Ger.), Espinago (Sp.). 

Extra Large Leaved Savoy. 

Broad Leaved Flanders. 

A great deal of this is raised for the New 
Orleans market. It is very popular. Sown 
from September to end of March. If the fall 
is dry and hot, it is useless to sow it, as the 
seeds require moisture and cool nights to 
make them come up. The richer the ground 
the larger the leaves. 

Extra Large Leaved Savoy. The 
leaves of this variety are large, thick and a 
little curled. Very good for family use, 

SroadLeavecl Flanders. This is the 

standard variety, both for market and family 

falsify or Oyster Plant. use. Leaves large, bvoad and very succulent. 




For tlie Southern States. 



73 



SORREL. 

OsEiLLE (FrJ, Sauekampfer (Ger.), Acedera (Sp.). 

Planted in drills a foot apart, during- the fall of the year, and 
thinned out from three to four inches in the drills. Sorrel is used for 
various purposes in the kitchen. It is used the same as Spinach ; also 
in soups and as a salad. 

SQUASH. 

Courge (Fr.), KtiRBiss (Ger.), Calabaza Tontanera (Sp.). 

London Vegetable Marrow. 
The Hubbard. 
Boston Marrow. 



Early Bush, or Patty Pan. 
Long Green, or Summer Crook 

NECK. 



Sow during March in hills from three to four feet apart, six to 
eight seeds. When well up, thin them out to three of the strongest 
plants. For a succession they can be planted as late as June. Some 
who protect by boxes, plant as soon as the first of February, but it is 
best to wait till the ground gets warm. When it is time to plant Corn, 
it is also time to plant Squash. 




Early Bush or Patty 



The Hubbard. 



Early BiisBi, or Patty Pan. Is the earliest and the only pop- 
ular kind here. All other varieties are very little cultivated, as the 
Cashaw Pumpkin, the striped variety, takes their ])lace. It is of dwarf- 
ish habit, grows bushy, and does not take much room. Quality as 
good as any. 

Long* Green, or Slimmer Crook-I\eek. This is a very 
strong grower, and continues in bearing longer than the first named 
kind. It is of good quality, but not so popular. 

JLondon Veg-etatole Marrow. A European variety, very little 
cultivated here. It grows to a good size and is very dry. Color whit- 
ish with a yellow tinge. 

The Hubbard. This is a Winter Squash, very highly esteemed 
in the East, but hardly cultivated here. 



74 



Bicliard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Boston Marrow. Cultivated to a large extent North and East 
for winter use, where it is used for custards, etc. It keeps for a long 
time and is of excellent quality, but not esteemed here, as most people 
consider the Southern grown Cashaw Pumpkin superior to an}'' Win- 
ter Squash. 

TOMATO. 



ToMATE (Fr.), LiEBESAPFEL (Ger. 

Extra ;Early Dwarf Red. 
Early Large Smooth Red. 

TiLDEN. 

Trophy, (Selected). 
Large Yellow. 



Tom ATE (Sp.) 

Acme. (New.) 
Paragon. (New.) 
Livingston's Perfection. 
Livingston's Favorite. 
Livingston's Beauty. 



Seed should be sown in January, in hot*beds, or in boxes, which 
must be placed in a sheltered spot, or near windows. In March they 
can be sov/n in the open ground. Tomatoes are generally sow^n too 




Selected Trophy. 



mmmm'^famBamsafm^^fsmimm 



For the Southern States. 



thick, and become too crowded when two to three inches high, which 
makes the plants too thin and spindly. If they are transplanted when 
two to three inches high, about three inches apart each way, they will 
become short and sturdy, and will not suffer when planted out into 
the open ground. Plant them from three to four feet apart. Some 
varieties can be planted closer; for instance, for the Extra Early, 
which is of very dwarfish habit, two and a half feet apart is enough. ' 
They should be supported by stakes. When allowed to grow up 
wild, the fruit which touches the ground will rot. For a late or fall 
crop the seed should be sown towards the latter end of May and during 
June. 

Extra Early Dwarf, This is the earliest in cultivation. It is 
dwarfish in habit ; fruit larger than the following kind, and more flat ; 
bright scarlet in color and very productive. For an early market va- 
riety it cannot be surpassed. 




The New Acme. 



Richard Frotnclier's Almanac and Garden Manual 




£arly JLarg^c !§iuootli 
Red. One of the earliest ; 
medium size ; skin light 
scarlet ; smooth and pro- 
ductive. 

Tildeii. This has been 
the standard varietj'- for 
family gardens as well as 
market, but has been sup- 
planted to a great extent 
by later introductions. It 
is of a good shape, bril- 
liant scarlet, and from 
above medium to large 
in size, and keeps well. 

Selected Trophy, A 

Extra Early Dwarf. Very large, smooth To- 

mato, more solid and heavier than any other kind. It is not quite as 
early as the Tilden. Has become a favorite variety. 

L,arg-e Yellow^. This is similar in shape to the Large Eed, but 
more solid. Xot very popular. 

Aeaiie. This is a new variety, and the prettiest and most solid 
Tomato ever introduced. It is of medium size, round and very smooth, 
a strong grower, and a good and long bearer. They are the perfection 
of Tomatoes for family use, but Avill not answer for shipping purposes ; 
the skin is too tender, and cracks when fully ripe. Of all the varieties 

introduced, none yet 
has surpassed this kind 
when all qualities are 
brought into considera- 
tion. It does well about 
liere where the ground 
is heavy. 

Pa rag-on. This va- 
riety has lately come in- 
to notice. It is very 
solid, of a bright red- 
dish crimson color, 
comes in about the 
same time as the Til- 
den, but is heavier in 
foliage, and protects its 
fruit. It is productive and keeps long in bearing. Well adapted 
for shipi'ing. 

LivingstOBi's Perfecticii. Very similar to the above in shape 
and color. 

Livingston's Favorite. This is the latest novelty ; it is as per- 
fect in shape and as solid as the Acme, but much larger, and of a 
handsome dark red color. I had some sent to me by a customer, and 
they surely were the finest specimen of tomatoes I ever saw, and 




For the Southern States. 



77 




Liviiiii'stou's Favorite. 



were admired by everybody who 
saw them. They will keep well, and 
do not crack. 

L.ivnE$?!i»toii's Beauty. A new 

variety, offered for the first time 
last year. It is quite distinct in 
color, being' a very glossy crimson 
with a light tinge of purple, (lighter 
than the Acme). It ripens with the 
Acme or Paragon, but keeps longer. 
It is very perfect in shape and does 
not crack, like some of the thin 
skinned sorts. 




Livinsston's Beauty, 



The seed of the hist five varieties arc raised for me l)y the originators, Messrs. 
Livingston's Sons, and can be relied upon as being true to name and of su])erior (luality. 



78 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



TURN 

Navet (Fr.), Rube (Ger.' 
Early Eed or Purple Top, 

(strap-leaved). 
Early White Flat Dutch, 

(strap-leaved). 
Purple Top Globe. 
Large White Globe. 
Pomerian Globe. 
White Spring. 
Yellow Aberdeen. 



IP. 

, Nabo Comun (Sp.). 
Golden Ball. 
Amber Globe. 
Early Purple Top Munich. 
Extra Early Purple Top. 
Purple Top Rut a Baga. 
Improved Rut a Baga. 
Extra Early White French, or 
White Egg Turnip (newl. 




Early Red or Purple Top (strap-leaved). 



For the Southern States. 



Turnips do best in new ground. When the soil lias keen worked 
long, it should receive a top dressing of land-plaster or ashes. If stable 
manure is used the ground should be manured the spring previous 
to sowing, so it may be well incorporated with the soil. When fresh 
manure is used the turnips are apt to become speckled. Sow from end 
of July till October for fall and winter, and in January, February and 
March for spring and summer use. They are generally sown broad- 
cast, but the Euta Baga should be sown in drills, or rather ridges, and 
should not be sown later than the end of August ; the Golden Ball and 
Aberdeen, not later than the end of September. The White Flat 
Dutch, Early Spring and Pomerian Globe are best for spring, but also 
good for autumn. 



Early White Flat Dutch (strap-leaved). 

Early Ked or Purple Top. (Strap-LezWed.) This is one of 
the most popular kinds. It is flat, with a small tap-root, and a bright 
purple top. The leaves are narrow and grow erect from the bulb. The 
flesh is finely grained and rich. 

Early White Flat Dutcli. (Steap-Leaved.j This is similar to 
the above in shape, but considered about a week earlier. It is very 
popular. 

Purple Top Olobe. A variety of recent introduction ; same 
shape as the Pomerian Globe, but with purple top. Fine variety for 
the table or for stock. It is not quite so early as the Early Pied or 
Purple Top. I recommend it very highly. 

Earg:e WliUc Olobe. A very large variety, mostly grown for 
stock. It can be used for the table when young. Flesh coarse, but 
sweet ; tops very large. 

Ponieriau Olobe, This is selected from the above. It is 
smoother and handsomer in shape ; good to plant early in spring. 
When pulled before it is too large it is a very salable turnip in the 
market. 

\l^liite Spring-. This is similar to the White Flat Dutch; not 
ciuite so large, but rounder in shape. The tops are larger ; it is early, 
a good quality, and best adapted for spring planting. 



80 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



irello\A^ Aberdeen. This is a variety very little cultivated here. 
It is shaped like the Euta Baga, color yello^y with purple top. Good 
for table use or feeding stock. 

Robertson's C^olden Ball, is the best of the yellow Turnips 
for table use. It is very smooth, oval in shape, and of a beautiful 
orange color. Leaves are small. Should be sown in the fall of the 
year, and always in drills, so that the plants can be thinned out and 
worked. Tli-is kind ought to be more cultivated. 

Amber G-lobe. This is very similar to the above kind. 

Early Purple Top :TIuaiicIi. A new variety from Germany; 
flat, with red or purjjle top ; same as the American variety, but fifteen 
days earlier to mature. It is very hardy, tender, and of fine flavor. 

Extra Early Purple Top. Same 
color and shape as the Early Purple Top, 
but earlier. Larger than the Purple Top 
Munich. The bulbs are smooth and do 
not get bitter like the foregoing kind, if 
left in the ground some time. 

Purple Top Ruta Bag:a or 
Swede. This is grown for feeding stock, 
and also for table use. It is oblong in 
shape, yellow flesh, very solid. Should 
always be sown in rows or ridges. 

Improved Purple Top Ruta 
B a g" a. Similar to the above ; but 
^ Early Purple Top. smoother, with but few flbrous roots. 





Pomerian Globe. 



For the Southern States. 



81 




Purple Top Globe. 




Extra Early white Freneli. or Wliito Eir^i' T 



• r.ir^i- I iiniii> 



82 



Bichard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Extra Early ll^liite French, or W^liite Egg Turnip. This 
is a lately introduced variety ; is said to be very early, tender and crisp. 
The shape of it is oblong, resembling an egg. Having tried it, I found 
it as represented, ciuickly growing, tender and sweet. It will never be- 
come a favorite market variety, as only flat kinds sell well in this 
market. It has to be pulled up soon, as it becomes pithy shortly after 
attaining maturity. 




Improved Purple Top Euta Baga 



SWEET AND MEDICINAL HEEBS. 

Some of these possess culinary as well as medicinal properties. 
Should be found in every garden. Ground where they are to be sown 
should be well prepared and pulverized. Some of them have very fine 
seed, and it is only necessary, after the seed is sown, to press the ground 
with the back of the spade ; if covered too deep they cannot come up. 
Early spring is the best time to sow them— some, such as Sage, Eose- 
mary. Lavender and Basil, are best sown in a frame and afterwards 
transplanted into the garden. 

Anise, Pimpinellc Anif^um. 

Balm, Melisse Offlcinalu. 

Basil, large and small leaved, Ocymum Ba^iliciim. 

Bene, Sesamum Orientale. 

Borage, Borago OfficinalU. 

Caraway, Carum Carni. 

Dill, Anethum Gj^aveolens. 

Fennel, sweet, Anethum Foeniculum. 

Lavender, Lavendula Vera. 

Majoram, sweet, Origanum 2Iayoram.. 

Pot Marigold, Calendula Officinalis. 

Rosemary, Bosemarij Officinalis. 

Rue, FiUta Graveolens. 

Sage, Salvia Officinalis. 

Summer Savory, Satureja Hortensi^. 

Thyme, Thifmas Vulgaris. 

Wormwood' AiHemisia Absint]iinm. 



For the Southern States. 83 



GRASS AND FIELD SEEDS, 



I have often been asked what kind of Grass Seed is the best for 
this hititude, but so far I have never been abk:; to answer this question 
aatisfactorily. For hay I do not think tiiere is anything better than 
the Millet. For permanent grass I have almobt corae to the conelusion 
that none of the grasses used for this purpose 'North and West will 
answer. Eye, Ked Oats and Rescue Grass will make winter pasturage 
in this latitude. Different kinds of Clover answer very well during 
spring, but during the hot summer months I have never found any- 
thing to stand and produce except the Bermuda andCrabgrass, which 
are indigenotis to the South. The Bermuda, in ray opinion, is better 
suited for pasturage than hay, as it is rather short and hard when 
cured. I have had so many applications for Guinea Grass that I have 
been induced to import some from Jamaica, where it is used altogether 
for pasturage. It seems to grow rank, but so far I am nat enabled to 
pass an opinion upon it ; it looks rather coarse for hay. Having tried 
Guinea Grass I have come to the conclusion that it will not answer 
here, from the fact that it will freeze out every year. It will pro- 
duce a large quantity of hay or green fodder, but has to be resown 
every spring. The seeds that are raised here are light, and do not 
germinate freely. To import seed every year is rather troublesome. 
The Johnson Grass, advertised by some as Guinea Grass, is not Guinea 
Grass ; it is much coarser, and can hardly be destroyed after having 
taken hold of a piece of ground. Some are enthusiastic about Alfalfa 
or Lucerne ; others, whose opinion ought also to be respected, say it 
will not do here. There exists a great difference of opinion in regard 
to which grass seed is most suitable for the South. 

Red Clover. Should be sown either during fall or early in 
spring. Six to eight pounds to an acre. 

White Dutch Clover. A grass sown for pasturage at the rate 
of four to six pounds to the acre. Should be sown in fall and early 
spring. 

Alfalfa or Chill Clover, or French L,Mceriie. Thib variety 
does well here, but the ground has to be well prepared and deeply 
plowed. It will not do in low wet ground. Should be sown in the fall 
of the year, or January and February ; eight to ten pounds per acre. 

Kentucky Blue Orass. (Extra Cleaned.) Should be sown 
in dry soil. Two bushels per acre. 

Meadow^ Fescue, Festaca pratensiti. As a pasture grass I con- 
sider this one of the most valuable. It is not affected by dry weather, 
as its roots penetrate the earth 12 to 15 inches ; it is much relished by 
all kinds of stock on account of its long and tender leaves. It yields 
a very superior hay when cured. It has been grown very little in this 
country and is deserving of much morf:^ attention. Sow in spring or 
fall. 2 bushels to the acre. In some sections it is called Eandall 
Grass. This should not be confounded with the English Eye Grass, 
offered by some dealers as the same variety. 



- 



84 RlcharO Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Orchard Ora§§. This is cue of the best grasses for pasturing. 
It grows quickly, much more so than the Blue Grass. Can be sown 
either in fall or spring. Sow one to one and a half bushels per acre. 
(See extract from "Farmers* Book of Grasses, "j 

Rescue Ora§s. A forage plant from Australia. It grows during 
winter. Sow the seed in the fall of the year, but not before the weather 
gets cool, as it will not sprout so long "as the ground is warm. Sow 
U bushels seed to the acre. 

If iiiigariaBi Grass. This is a valuable annual forage plant, and 
good to make hay. Sow three peeks to the acre. It should be out 
when in bloom, 

Oeriiiaai llillet. Of all the Millets this is the be^t. It makes 
good hay, and produces heavily. Three pecks sown to the acre 
broad-cast secures a good stand. Can be sown from April till June, 
but the former month is the best time. Should be cut the same as the 
fort^going kind. 

Rye, Is sown during the fall months as late as December, for 
forage ; and for pasturage, during winter and spring. 

Barley, Fall. Can be sown fall and winter, but requires strong, 
good soil. Used here for forage during its green state. 

Rc^ or Rust Proof Oats. It is only a few years since these 
uats have come into general cultivation. They are very valuable, 
and will save a great deal of corn on a farm. The seed of this variety 
has a reddish cast, and a peculiar long beard, and is very heavy. It 
is the only kind which will not rust in the Southern climaJ"e. They 
can be sown as early as October, but should be pastured down as 
suon as they commence to joint, till February. When the ground is 
luw, or the season wet. this cannot well be done without destroying the 
whole crop. During January and February is the proper time, if no 
pasturing can be done. One to one and a half bushels per acre is suf- 
ficient. These oats have a tendency to stool, and therefore do not re- 
quire as much per acre as common oats. Those who have not already 
tried this variety should do so. 

§4»rgliiiiii. Is planted for feeding stock during the spring and 
early summer. For this purpose it should be sown as early in spring 
as possible, in drills about two to three feet apart : tliree to four quarts 
per acre. It makes excellent green fodder. 

Dlioiiro, or Egyptian Corn. Scughum vulgare. This is a 
well known cereal. It produces a large quantity of seed, of which 
fowls and animals are fond.— Can also be sown broad-cast for soiling 
or in drills for fodder and seed. If sowed in drills, one peck of" seed 
I'cr acre is ample. If sown broad-cast, one bushel i:>er acre. For 
grain, the stalks should not be nearer than 10 inches in the drill, but 
if to be cut repeatedly for soiling, it is better to sow quite thickly in 
the hills. Seed should not be sown too early, and covered from one 
half to one inch. If too much rain in the Spring, the seed will not 
come well ;— they require more heat than the other Sorghums. Plural 
Branching Sorghum or Millo Maize produces the seed heads upright 



For the Southern States. 



85 



in a vortical ix^sition, while tlio others are (lrop[)iiig. Tiio seeds are 
smaller, but will keep longer than the other varieties. The stalk 
grows very large and produces a good many large leaves. It suekers 
and tillers more and more the ot'tener it is cut. Jt exceeds greatly in 
yield of green fodder any of the familiar fodder plants, except the 
"Teosinte."— It should be planted exclusively in drills four feet apart, 
18 to 20 inches in the drills. 

Broom Corn. Can be planted the same as corn, but the hills 
closer together in the row. Six quarts will plant an acre. 

The following extracts have been taken, by permission, from the 
author. Dr. D, L. Phares, from his book just published, "rarmers' 
Book of Grasses." It is the most valuable work of the kind ever pub- 
lished in^the South, and should be in the hands of every one who 
takes an interest in the cultivation of grasses. 

Copies for sale at publisher's price. Paper covers, 50 cents ; Cloth, 
75 cents ; postage paid. 



ORCHARD GRASS. 

(DactyUd Glomerata.j 

Of all the grasses this is one of the most widely diffused, gro wing- 
in Africa, Asia, and every country in Europe and all our States. It is 
more highly esteemed and commended than any other grass, by a lar- 
ger number of farmers in most countries— a most decided proof of its 
great value and wonderful adaptations to many soils, climates and 
treatments. Yet, strange to say, though growing in England for 
many centuries, it was not appreciated in that country till carried 
there from Virginia in 1764. But, as in the case of Timothy, soon after 
its introduction from xlmerica, it came into high favor among far- 
mers, and still retains its hold on their estimation as a grazing and 
hay crop. 

Nor is this strange when its many advantages and points of excel- 
lence are considered. It will grow well on any soil containing suffi- 
cient clay a)id not holding too much water. If the land be too tena- 
eious, drainage will remedy the soil; if worn out, atop dressing of 
stable manure will give it a good send-off, and it will furnish several 
good mowings the first year. It grows well between 29o and 48 ' lati- 
tude. It may be mowed from two to four times a year, according to 
the latitude, season and treatment ; yielding from one to three tons of 
excellent hay per acre on poor to medium lanrl. In grazing anrl as 
hay, most animals select it in preference among mixtures in other 
grasses. In lower latitudes it furnishes good winter grazing, aa well 
as for spring, summer and fall. After grazing or mowing, few grasses 
grow so rapidly (three or six inches per week), and are so soon ready 
again for tooth or blade. It is easily curt^d and handled. It is 
readily seeded, and catches with certainty. Its long, deeply penetrat- 
ing, fibrous roots enable it to sustain itself and grow vigorously dur- 
ing droughts that dry up other grasses, except tall oat grass, which 
has similar ro^ts and characteristics. It grows well in open lands 
and in forests of large trees, the uuderbush being all cleared off. I 



Fufhard Frotschers Almanac and Garden Manual 



have had it grown luxuriantly even in beech woods, where the root? 
are superficial, in the crotches of roots and close to the trunks of trees. 
The hay is of high ciuality,. and the young grass contains a larger per 
centage of nutritive digestible matter than any other grass. It thrives 
well without any renewal on the same ground for thirty-flve, nay 
forty years ; how much longer, I am not able to say. It is easily exter- 
minated when the land i? desired for other crops. Is there any other 
grass for which so much can be said? 

RED TOP ORASS. 

[Agro-sti? Vidgari^i.} 

This is the best grass of England, the herd grass of the Southern 
States : not in honor of any man, but, probably, because so well adapted 
to the herd. It is called also Fine Top, Burden's and Borden's Grass. 
Varying greatly in characters, according to soil, location, climate and 
culture, some botanists have styled it A. Fohimorplia. It grows two to 
three feet high, and I have mown it when four feet high. It grows 
well on hill-tops and sides, in ditches, gullies and marshes, but de- 
lights in moist bottom land. It is not injured by overflows, though 
-omewhat prolonged. In marshy land it produces a very dense, strong 
network of roots capable of sustaining the weight of men and animals 
vralking over it. 

It furnishes considerable grazing during warm ''spells" in winter. 
and in -pring and summer an abundant supply of nutrition. It has 
a tendency, being very hardy, to increase in density of growth and ex- 
tent of surface, and will continue indefinitely, though easily subdued 
by the plow. 

Cut before maturing seed, it nlakes a good hay and large quantity. 
It seems to grow taller in the Southern States than it does further 
Xorth, and to make more and better hay and grazing. Bed Top and 
Timothy, being adapted to the same soil and maturing at the same 
time, do well together, and produce an excellent hay. But the Bed Top 
will finally root out Timothy, and if pastured much it will do so sooner. 

Sow about two bushels (24 lbs.) per acre, if alone, in September, 
October, February, or March ; if with Timothy for hay, from G to 10 
pounds : if with other grasses for pasture, .3 to 5 pounds. It is an ex- 
cellent pasture grass, and will grow on almost any kind of soil. 

KEXTrCKY BLUE GRASS. 

(Foa Frat^n^i^., 

This is also called smooth meadow grass, spear grass, and green 
irrass, all three very appropriate, characteristic names. But Blue is a 
misnomer for this grass. It is not blue, but 'green as grass.' and the 
greenest of grasses. The P. comjyy^essa. flat-stalked meadow grass, 
wire grass, blue grass is blue, "the true blue" crrass from which the 
genus received its trivial name. 

Kentucky blue grass, known also in the Eastern States as June 
grass, although esteemed in some parts of America as the best of all 
pasture grasses, seems not to be considered very valutble among Eng- 
lish farmers except in mixtures. It is certainly a very desirable pas- 
tare grass however. It? very narrow leaves, one, two or more feet 



For the Southern States. 



87 



If 



long, are in such profusion, and cover the ground to such depth with 
their luxuriant growth, that a mere description could give no one an 
adequate idea of its beaut}^ quantity, and value ; that is on rich land. 
On poor, sandy land, it degenerates sadly, as do other things uncon- 
genially located. 

Perennial, and bearing cold and drought well, it furnishes grazing 
a large part of the year. It is specially valuable as a winter and spring 
grass for the South. To secure the best winter results, it should be 
allowed a good growth in early fall, so that the ends of the leaves, 
being killed by frost, afford an ample covering for the under-parts which 
continue to grow all winter, and afford a good bite whenever required 
by sheep, cattle, hogs and horses. In prolonged summer drought it 
dries completely, so that, if fired, it would burn off clean. But this 
occurs in Kentucky-, where indeed it has seemed without fire, to disap- 
pear utterly ; yet, when rain came, the bright green spears promptly 
recarpeted the earth. 

With its underground stems and many roots, it sustains the heat 
and drought of the Southern States as ^vell as those of Kentucky, 
where indeed it is subjected to severer trials of this kind than in the 
more Southern States. In fact, it bears the vicissitudes of our climate 
about as ^vell as Bermuda grass, and is nearly as nutritious. 

Blue grass groAvs w^ell on hill tops, slopes, or bottom lands, if not 
too wet and too poor. It may be sown an^^ time from September to 
April, preferably perhaps in the latter half of February, or early in 
March. The best catch I ever had w^as sown the 20th of March, on 
unbroken land, from which trash, leaves, etc., had just been burned. 
The surface of the land should be cleaned of trash of all kinds, smooth, 
even ; and if recently plowed and harrowed, it should be rolled also. 
This last proceeding is for compacting the surface in order to prevent 
the seed from sinking too deep, in the ground. Without harrowing 
or brushing in, many of them get in too deep to come up, even when 
the surface of the land has had the roller over it. The first rain after 
seeding will put them in deep enough, as the seeds are very minute, 
and the spears of grass small as fine needles, and therefore unable to 
get out from under heavy cover. These spears are so small as to be 
invisible, except to close examination ; and in higher latitudes, this 
condition continues through the first year. Thus, some who have 
sow^n the blue grass seed, seeing the first year no grass, imagine they 
have been cheated, plant some other crop, and probably lose what 
close inspection would have showm to be a good catch. This, however, 
is not apt to occur in the Southern tier of States, as the growth here is 
more rapid. The sowing mentioned above, made on the 20th of 
March, came up promptly, and in three months the grass was from six 
to ten inches high. One year here gives a finer growth and show thau 
two in Kentucky, or any other State so far North. 

Sown alone, 20 to 2G pounds, that is 2 bushels, should be used ; in 
mixtures, 4 to fi i>ounds. 

ENGLISH OR PERENNIAL RYE GRASS. 

(LoVatm Perenne.) 
This is the first grass cultivated in England over two centuries ago, 
and at a still more remote period in France. It was long more widely 



88 Bichard Frot.^chey-'s Almanac and Garden Mannal 



known and eultivated than any other grass, became adapted to a 
great variety of soils and conditions, and a vast number (seventy or 
more) of varieties produced, some of which were greatly improved , while 
others were inferior and became annuals. Introduced into the United 
States in the first quarter of the carrent century, it has never become 
very popular, although shown by the subjoined analysis of Way not to 
be deficient in nutritive matter. In 100 parts of the dried grass cut in 
bloom were albuminoids 11.85, fatty' matters 3.17, heat-producing 
principles 42. 24, woody fibre 35.20, a^h 7.51. The more recent analysis 
of Wolff and Knopp, allowing for water, gives rather more nutritive 
matter than this. 

It grows rapidly, and yields heavy crops of seed ; makes good graz- 
ing, and good hay. But, as with all the Eye grasses, to make good hay, 
it must be cut before passing the blossom stage, as after that it deteri- 
orates rapidly. The roots being short, it does not bear drought well, 
and exhausts the soil, dying out in a few years. In these respects it 
is liable to the same objections as Timothy. The stem, one to two 
feet high, has four to six purplish joints and as many dark green 
leaves ; the flexions spiked panicle, bearing the distant spikelets, one 
in each bejid. 

It should be sown in August or September, at the rate of twenty- 
five or thirty pounds, or one bushel seed per acre. 

TALL MEADOWY OAT GRASS, 

I Arrhenatheriim Avenaceum.j 

Evergreen grass in Virginia, and other Southern States, and it is 
the Tall Oat (Arena elatior) of Lin£Eus. It is closely related to the 
common pat, and has a beautiful open panicle, leaning slightly to one 
side. "Spikelets two flowered, and a rudiment of a third, open ; lowest 
flower staminate or sterile, with a long bent awn below the middle of 
the back."— (Flint.) 

It is widely naturalized and well adapted to a great variety of soils. 
On sandy, or gravelly soils, it succeeds admirably, growing two or 
three feet high. On rich, dry upland it grows from five to seven feet 
high. It has an abundance of perennial, long fibrous roots, penetrating 
deeply in the soil, being, therefore, less affected by drought or cold, and 
enabled to yield a large quantity of foliage, winter and summer. These 
advantages render it one of the very best grasses for the South, both 
for grazing (being evergreen) and for hay, admitting of being cuttwicQ 
a year. It is probably the best winter grass that can be "obtained. 

It will make twice as much hay as Timothy, and, containing a 
greater quantity of albuminoids and less of heat-producing principles, 
it is better adapted to the uses of the Southern farmer, while it exhausts 
the surface soil less, and may be grazed indefinitely, except after mow- 
ing. To make good hay it must be cut the instant it blooms, and, after 
being cut, must not get wet by dew or rain, which damages it greatly 
in quality and appearance. 

For green soiling, it may be cut four or five times with favorable 
seasons. In from six to ten days after blooming, the seeds begin to 
ripen and fall, the upper ones first. It is, therefore, a little troublesome 
to save the seed. As soon as those at the top of the panicle ripen suffi- 



For the Southern States. 89 



ciently to begin to (lro[), the heads shouhl he eut ofT and dried, when 
the seeds will all thresh out readily and be matured. After the seeds 
are ripe and taken off, the long abundant leaves and stems .are still 
green, and being mowed mal<;e good hay. 

It may be sown in March or April, and mowed the same season ; 
but for heavier yield, it is better to sow in September or October. 
Along the more southernly belt, from the 31" parallel southward, it may 
be sown in November and onward till the middle of December. ^Yhen- 
ever sown it is one of the most certain grasses to have a good catch. 
Not less than two bushels (14 pounds) per acre should be sown. Like 
Timothy, on inhospitable soils, the root may sometimes become bulb- 
ous. The average annual nutrition yielded by this grass in the 
Southern belt, is probably twice as great as in Pennsylvania and other 
Northern States. 

JOHNSON GRASS. 

' ' {Sorghum Italapense.) 

This has been called Cuba grass, Guinea grass, Egyptian grass. 
Means grass, Alabama Guinea grass, etc. 

It seems pretty well agreed now, however, to call it Johnson grass, 
and leave the name Guinea giass for the Panlcum jumentorum, Xo 
which it properly belongs. 

It is true that in Mr. Howard's pamphlet, as well as in many period- 
icals and books, and in letters and common usage, this grass has been 
far more generally called Guinea grass than the true Guinea grass it- 
self, thus causing vast confusion. It is, therefore, assuredly time to 
call each by its right name. Johnson grass is perennial and has cane- 
like roots, or more properly, underground stems, from the size of a 
goose-quill to that of the little finger. These roots are tender, and 
hogs are fond of and thrive on them in winter. The roots literally fill 
the ground near the surface, and every joint is capable of developing 
a bud. Hence the grass is readily propagated from root cuttings. It 
is also propagated from the seeds, but not always so certainly; for in 
some localities many faulty seeds are produced, and in other places 
no seeds are matured. Before sowing the seeds, therefore, they should 
be tested, as should all grass seeds indeed, in order to know what pro- 
portion will germinate, and thus what quantity per acre to sow. One 
bushel of a good sample of this seed is sufficient for one acre of land. 

The leaf, stalk and panicle of this grass resemble those of other 
sorghums. It grows on any land where corn will grow ; and like the 
latter, the better the land the heavier the crop. On rich land the 
culms attain a size of over half an inch in diameter, and a height of 
seven feet. It should be cut while tender, and then all live stock are 
fond of it ; for a few weeks are sufficient to render it so coarse and 
hard-TTTaimnimals refuse it, or eat sparingly. 

A few testimonials are here quoted to give an idea of the produc- 
tiveness and value of this plant. In a letter published in the Rural 
Carolinian for 1874, Mr. N. B. Moore, who had for more than forty 
years grown crops, speaks of this grass under the name of Guinea 
grass : 



90 Bichard DrAscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



"My meadow consists of one hundred acres of alluvial land, near 
Augusta. * * =*< In winter I employ but four men, who are 
enough to work my packing-press; in summer, when harvesting, 
double that number. In autumn I usually scarify both ways with 
sharp, steel-toothed harrows, and sow over the stubble a peck of red 
clover per acre, which, with volunteer vetches, comes off about the 
middle of May. The second yield of clover is uniformh' eaten up by 
grasshoppers. The tap root rernains to fertilize the then coming 
Guinea grass, which should be but from two to three feet high. * * * 
On such land as mine, it will afford three or four cuttings if the season 
is propitious. I use an average of five tons of gypsum soon after the 
first cutting, and about the same quantity of the best commercial fer- 
tilizers, in March and April. * * * The grass, which is cut before 
noon, is put up with horse sulky rakes, in cocks, before sun-down. '" 

Mr. Moore's income from this field was from seven thousand to 
ten thousand dollars a year. 

Mr. Goelsel, of Mobile, says : 'Tt is undoubtedly the most profitable 
soiling plant yet introduced, and also promises to be the jAant for our 
Southern hay stacks, provided it can be cut every three or four weeks. 

]^ote.--Eecognizing all the above, I would say, that great care 
must be taken not to sow this grass near cultivated lands. If done, 
it should not be allowed to go to seed, as the wind will blow them off 
from the stalks, and when it gets amongst cane or other crops it causes 
a great deal of trouble. It is almost impossible to get it out of the land. 



RESCUE GRASS. 

. ( Ceratochloa aiisti^aJis or Bromus Schraderi.j 

It is an annual winter grass. It varies in the time of starting growth. 
I have seen it ready for mowing the first of October and furnish fre- 
quent cuttings till April. Again, it may not start before January, nor 
be ready to cut till February. This depends upon the moisture and 
depression of temperature. When once started, its growth, after the 
successive cuttings or grazings, is very rapid. It is tender, very sweet, 
and stock eat it greedily. It makes also a good hay. It produces an 
immense quantity of leaves. On loose soil some of it may be i^ulled 
out by animals grazing it. I have seen it bloom as earlj* as November 
when the season had favored it, and no grazing or cutting were per- 
mitted. Oftener it makes little start before January. But whether 
late or early starting, it may be grazed or mowed frequently, until 
April, it still will mature seed. It has become naturalized in limited 
portions of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and perhaps other 
States. It is a very pretty grass in all its stages ; and especialy so 
when the culms, two or three feet high, are gracefully bending with 
the weight of the diffuse panicle with its many pedicelled flattened 
spikelets, each an inch or more long and with twelve to sixteen flowers. 

I would not, however, advise sowing this grass on poor land with 
the expectation of getting a remunerative return. It tillers abundantly 
under favorable conditions. 



For the Southern States. 



91 



DIRECTIONS FOR PLANTING. 



The directions given here are for the Southern part of Louisiana. 
If applied to localities North of here, the time of planting will not be 
quite so early in spring, and earlier in fall. For instance : the direc- 
tions for January will answer for February in the Northern part of 
this State, and Southern part of Mississippi or Arkansas. In autumn, 
directions for September can be followed in August. In those sections, 
very little can be planted in November and December. 



JANUARY. 

Sow Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, Beets, Parsnips and Leeks, the 
early varieties of Eadish, and for the last crop, the Black Spanish. 

Sow Spring and Purple Top Turnip. Ruta Baga may also be sown, 
for table use later in spring. 

Sow Lettuce, Endive, Cabbage, Broccoli, Kohlrabi, and early Cauli- 
flower ; the latter best sown in a frame to be transplanted next month. 

Cress, Chervil, Parsley and Celery for cutting, should be sown 
this month. Sow Eoquette and Sorrel. 

If the hot-bed has not been prepared already, make it at once to 
sow Egg Plant, Pepper and Tomatoes. 

All kinds of Herb seed may be sown during this month. Plant 
Peas for a general crop, towards the end of the month the Extra Early 
varieties may be ijlanted. 

Plant Potatoes, but the Early Pvose should not be planted before 
the latter end of this month. 

Divide and transplant Shallots. Transplant Cabbage plants sown 
in November. Onions, if not already set out, should be hurried with 
now, so they may have time to bulb. Those who desire to raise Onion 
sets, should sow the seed this month, as they may be usfed for setting 
out early in the fall, and can be sold sooner than those raised from 
seed. Creole seed is the only kind which can be used to raise sets 
from. Northern seed will not make sets. This I know from experience. 
Asparagus roots should be set out this month. 

Red Oats can be sown. I consider these and the German Millet 
the two best annual forage plants for Louisiana. 

Cucumbers can be planted in the hot-bed ; they are mostly jilanted 
here during November and December, but if the hot-bed is properly 
made, those planted in this month will bear better than those planted 
in November. 

FEBRUARY. / 

All winter vegetables can be sown this month, such as Spinach, 
Mustard, Carrots, Beets, Parsnip and Leeks. Also, the early varieties 



92 Richard I^roUcher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



of Radishes and Spring- and Purple T^M) Turnip. Swiss Chard and 
Kohlrabi, 

Sow, forsnccession, Lettuce, Cabbage and Early Cauliflower ; if the 
season is favorable, and the month of April not too dry, the latter may 
succeed. 

Cauliflovrer and Cabbage plants should be transplanted ; Shallots 
divided and set out again. 

Sow Sorrel, Eoquette, Chervil, Parsley, Cress and Celery. 

Peas of all kinds can be planted, especially the early varieties. 
The late kinds should be sown in January, but they may be planted 
during this month. 

This is the time to plant the general crop of Potatoes. On an aver- 
age the3' "^"^ill succeed better when planted during this, than during 
any other month. 

Herb seeds should be planted ; tender varieties best sown in a 
frame, and transplanted into the open ground afterwards. 

Asparagus roots should be planted; this is the proper month to 
sow the seed of this vegetable. 

Plants in the hot-bed will recxuire attention ;.give air when the sun 
ihines, and the weather is pleasant. If too thick, thin out, so they 
may become sturdy. 

Bush Beans can be commenced with this month ; Cucumbers, 
Squash and ^Melons ma^- be tried, as they often succeed ; if protected 
by small boxes, as most gardeners protect them, there is no risk at all. 

Corn can be planted towards the end of this month. For market, 
the Adams Extra Early and Early White Flint are planted. I recom- 
mend the Sugar varieties for family use ; they.are just as large as those 
mentioned, and Stowel's Evergreen is as large as any varietj^ grown. 

Mangel Wurzel and Sugar Beet should be sown in this month for 
stock. Sweet Potatoes can be put in a bed for sprouting, so as to have 
early slips. 

MARCH. 

Sow Beets, Eadish, Cabbage, early varieties; Kohlrabi. Lettuce, 
Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, Swiss Chard and Leek. 

Also, Celery for cutting, Parsley, Eouuette, Cress and Chervil. The 
latter part of the month sow Endive. Of Lettuce, the Eoyal Cabbage 
and Perpignan ; the White Coss is a favorite variety for spring: the 
Butterhead will run into seed too quickly, and should not ])e sown 
later than the middle of February, in this latitude. 

Plant a full supply of Bush and Pole Beans. For Lima Beans bet- 
ter to wait till towards the end of the month, a- thev rot easily when 
the ground is not warm enough, or too wet. 

Squash, Cucumbers- Melons and Okra can be planted. The remark 
in regard to Lima Beans holds good for Okra. Early varieties of Peas 
may still be planted. 

Tomatoes, Egg Plants and Peppers can be set out in the open 
ground, and seed sown for a later crop. Plant Sweet Corn. 

Potatoes can be planted ; all depends upon the season. Some 
vears they do as well as those jdauted during last month. 



For the Southern States. 93 



Beans are hard to keep in this climate, and tlierefore very few are 
planted for shelling purposes. AVith a little care, however, they can 
be kept, but they ought not to be planted before the first of August, 
so that they may ripen when the weather gets cooler. When the 
season is favorable leave them out till dry ; gather the pods and expose 
them a few days to the sun. It is best to shell them at once, and after 
they are shelled put them to air and sun again for a few days longer. 
Sacks are better to keep them in than barrels and boxes. The Ked 
and White Kidney are generally the varieties used for drying. Beans 
raised in spring are hard to keep, and if intended for seed they should 
be ]jut up in bottles, or in tin boxes, and a little camphor sprinkled 
between them. 

Sweet Potatoes should be planted. 



APRIL. 

Sow Bu-,]:i, Pole and Lima Beans, Sweet Corn, Cucumbers, Scpiash, 
Melons and Okra. 

Beets, Carrots, Swiss Chard, Radish, Lettuce, Mustard, Endive, 
Roquette, Cress, Parsley, Chervil and Celery for cutting. 

Sow Tomatoes, Egg Plants and Pepper for succession. It is rather 
late to sow Cabbage seed now, but if sown, the early varieties only can 
be successfully used. Kohlrabi can still be sown, but it is best to sow 
it thinly in drills a foot apart, and thin out to four inches in the rows. 

Towards the end of this month a sowing of the late Italian Giant 
Cauliflower can be made. It is very large, and takes from eight to 
nine months before it matures, so it has to be sown early. It is always 
best to make a couple of sowings, so that in case one should fail the 
other may be used. This variety is hardier than the French and Ger- 
man kinds. A good plan is to sow the seed in boxes, elevated two feet 
or more »lbove the ground, as it will keep the cabbage-fly off. The 
plants should be overlooked daily, and all green cabbage worms or 
other vermin removed. 

Sweet Potato Slips, for early crop, can be planted out. Early Irish 
Potatoes will be fit to dig now, and the ground they are taken out of 
may be planted with Corn, Beans, Squash, etc. 

Sow Pumpkins of both kinds, the Field and the Cashaw. 

German Millet should be sown this month. The ground ought to 
be well plowed and harrowed. Three pecks of seed is the ({uantum to 
be sown per acre. It will be well to roll the ground after sowmg, and 
the seed will require no other covering. If no roller is handy, some 
brush tied together ought to be passed over the ground sown. For hay, 
it should be cut when in flower. Every planter should give it a trial. 

MAY. 

Very few varieties of vegetables can be sown during this month. 
Many of the winter varieties will not do well if sown now. The grounds 
should now be occupied with growing crops. * 

Where Potatoes and Onions are taken up. Corn, Melons, Cucumbers, 
Squash and Pumpkins may be planted. 



94 Ricliard FroUclier's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Nothing of the Cabbage kind, except the Creole Cabbage seed, can 
be sown this month. It is supposed to stand the heat better than the 
otlier varieties, but it makes only loose heads, and runs up to seed as 
early as the end of November. 

Yellow and white summer Kadish and Endive should be bown. 
Lettuce requires much water during hot weather, and, if neglected, 
will become hard and tasteless. The PeriDignan is the be&t kind for 
summer use- Okra can still be sown. 

The first; sowing of White Solid Celery is to be made this month. 
The seed requires to be shaded, and, if the weather is dry, should be 
regularly watered. Late Italian Cauliflower should be sown. 

Cow Peas can be planted between the corn, or the crowders in rows ; 
the latter are the best to be used green. If they are sown for fertiliz- 
ing purposes, they are sown one bushel per acre, and plowed under 
when the ground is well covered ; or sometimes they are left till fall, 
when they commence to decay, and then plowed down. 

Sweet Potato Slips can be set out, taking advantage of an occa- 
sional rain : if it does not rain they have to bo watered. The top of 
Shallots will commence to get dry; this indicates that they are fit to 
take up. Pull them up and expose to the sun for a few days, and then 
store them away in a dry, airy place, taking care not to lay them too 
thick, as they are liable to heat. Lima or Pole Beans can be planted : 
the Southern Prolific is the best variety for late planting. 



JUNE. 

This month is similar to the last, that is, not a great deal can be 
sown. The growing crops will require attention, as weeds grow fast . 
Plant Corn for the last supply of roasting ears. A few Water and Musk 
Melons may be planted Cucumbers, Squash and Pumpkins planted 
this month generally do very well, but the first requires an abundance 
of water if the weather is dry. 

Southern Prolific Pole Beans may be planted during this month. 
Continue to set out Sweet Potato Vines. 

Sow Yellow and White Summer Eadish ; sow Endive for Salad ; 
this is raised more easily than the Lettuce. 

Lettuce can be sowm, but it requires more care than most people 
are willing to bestow. Soak the seeds for half an hour in water, take 
them out and put them in a piece of cloth and place in a cool spot— un- 
der the cistern, or, if convenient, in an ice box. Keep the cloth moist, 
and in two or three days the seeds will sprout. Then sow them ; best 
to do so in the evening, and give a watering. 

If the seed is sown without being sprouted, ants will be likely to 
carry it away before it can germinate, and the seedsman be blamed 
for selling seeds that did not grow. This sprouting has to be done 
from May to September, depending upon the weather. Should the 
weather be moist and cool in the fall, it can be dispensed Avith. Some 
sow late Cabbage for winter crop in this month, saying that the plants 
£H:e easier raised during this than the two following months. I con- 
sider this month too soon ; plants will become too hard and long-legged 
before they can be planted out. 



Fo7^ the Southern States. 



95 



This is the last month to sow the Late Italian Cauliflower ; towards 
the end the Early Italian Giant Cauliflower can be sown. Some culti- 
vators transplant them, when large enough, at once into the open 
ground ; others plant them first into flowerpots and transplant them 
into the ground later. If transplanted at this time, they will require 
to be shaded for a few days, till they commence to grow. 

Sow Tomatoes for late crop during the latter part of this month. 



JULY. 



Plant Pole Beans ; also, Bush Beans, towards the end of the month. 
Sow Tomatoes in the early part for the last crop. Some Corn for roast- 
ing ears may still be planted. Cucumbers can be planted tor pickling. 
Early Giant Cauliflower can be sown. Sow Endive, Lettuce, Yellow 
and White Summer Radish. Where the ground is new, some Turnips 
and Rata Bagas can be sown. Cabbage should be commenced with 
after the 15th of this month; Superior Flat Dutch, Improved Drum- 
head, St. Denis, or Bonneuil and Brunswick are the leading kinds. 
It is hard to say which is the best time to sow, as our seasons differ so 
much— some seasons we get frost early, other seasons not before Jan- 
uary. Cabbage is most easily hurt by frost when it is half grown ; 
when the plants are small, or when they are headed up, frost does not 
hurt much. It is always good to make two or three sowings. As a 
general thing, plants raised from Jaly and August sown seeds give the 
most satisfaction ; they are almost certain to head. September, in my 
experience, is the most ticklish month ; as the seed sown in that month 
is generally only half grown when we have some frosts, and, therefore, 
more liable to be hurt. But there are exceptions. Some years ago the 
seed sown in September turned out best. Seed sown at the end of 
October and during November generally give good results. November 
is the proper month to sow for shipping, The surest way to sow is in 
a cold frame, to protect the plants from frosts which sometimes occur 
in December and January. Januar^^ and the early part of February, 
is early enough to set out. Brunswick and Excelsior are the earliest of 
the large growing kinds, and it should be sown in July and August, so 
that it may be headed up when the cold comes, as it is more tender 
than the Flat Dutch and Drumhead. The same maybe said in regard 
to the St. Denis. All cabbages require strong, good soil ; but these two 
varieties particularly. Brunswick makes also a very good spring cab- 
bage v/hen sown at the end of October. The standard varieties, the 
Superior Flat Dutch and Improved Drumhead, should be sown at the 
end of this month and during next. It is better to sow plenty of seeds 
than to be short of plants. I would prefer one hundred plants raised 
in July and August, to four times that amount raised in September. It 
is very hard to protect the young plants from ravages of the fly. 
Strong tobacco water is as good as anything else for this purpose, or 
tobacco stems cut flne and scattered over the ground will keep them 
off to some extent. As the plants have to be watered, the smell of the 

tobacco will drive the flies away. 

J 



96 Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



AUGUST. 

This is a very active month for gardening in the South. Plant 
Bush Beans. Extra Early and Washington Peas. iSow late Cabbages 
and Drumhead Savoy, also Broccoli. Brussels Sprouts and Kale. The 
Early Italian Giant Cauliflower may still be sown; but now is the 
proper time to sow the Half Early Paris. Asiatic and other early varie- 
ties. 

Sow Parsley, Eoquette, Chei;vil, Lettuce, Endive and Sorrel: 
but, in ease of dry weather, these seeds will have to be watered fre- 
quently. 

Continue to sow Yellow Turnip Eadishes, and commence to sow red 
varieties, such as Scarlet Turnip. Half Long Erench and Long Scarlet. 

Towards the end of the month the Black Spanish Eadish can be 
= own ; also. Swiss Chard. 

Sow Mustard and Cress : the former will generally do well. All 
kinds of Turnips and Euta Bagas should be sown : also, Kohlrabi. 

The seed of all kinds of Beets should be put in the ground. 

Towards the end of the month Carrots can be sown ; but the sowic 
of all vegetables at this time of the year depends much upon the sea- 
son. If we should have hot and dry weather, it is useless to do much, 
as seed cannot come up without being watered. White Solid Celery 
should be sown for a succession, and the Dwarf kinds for spring use. 

Shallots can be set out during this month : also. Onion Sets, especi- 
ally if they are raised from Creole seed. The early part of the month 
is the proper time to plant Eed and White Kidney Beans, for shellic^ 
and drying for winter use. 

Early Eose and other varieties of Potatoes should be planted earr 
this month for a winter crop, and the latest of Tomato plants should 
be set out. if not done last month. If Celery plants are set out duriD:. 
this month, they require to be shaded. 



SEPTEMBER. 
• 
Most of the seeds recommended for last month can be sown this 

month, and some more added. 

In the early part. Bush Beans can be planted, as they will bear be- 
fore frost comes. Plant Extra Early and early varieties of Peas. St- ' 
Eadishes of all kinds. Carrots. Beets, Parsnip. Salsify. Eoquette, Cher- 
vil. Parsley. Sorrel. Cress. Lettuce, Endive. Leek. Turnips. Kohlrabi. 
Br<:>cc'di. Early Cauliflower. Kale. Celery. Corn Salad and Mustard. 

After the ISth of this month. Creole Onion seed can be sown. This 
is an important crop, and should not be neglected. If it is very tiry. 
cover the bed, after the seed has been sown, with green moss; it will 
keep the ground moist, and the seed will come up more regularl> . 
The moss has to be taken off as the young plants make their app^ai- 
anc<^. 

Celery plants may be set out in ditches prepared for that puri><.-:?f . 
Cauliflower and Cabbage plants can be transplanted if the weather is 
favorable. 



For the Southern Statea. 



97 



If the weather is not too hot and dry, Spinach should be sown ; but 
it is useless to do so if the weather is not suitable. 

Cabbage can be sown, but it is much better to sow in August and 
transplant during this month. 

Set out Shallots. Sorrel should be divided and rei)lanted. 

Sow Turnip-rooted Celery. 

OCTOBER. 

Artichokes should be dressed, the suckers or sprouts taken off, and 
new plantings made. 

Onion seed can still be sown ; but it is better to get the seed into 
the ground as soon as possible, so the plants get to be some size before 
the cold weather comes. 

Towards the end of the month Black Eye Marrowfat Peas can be 
l)lanted ; also, English or Windsor Beans. 

Sow Cabbage, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Brussels Sj^routs, Kale, Spi- 
nach, Mustard, Swiss Chard, Carrots, Beets, Salsify, Leek, Corn Salad, 
Parsley, Roquette, Chervil, Kohlrabi, Eadish, Lettuce, Endive and 
Parsnip. Shallots from the first planting can be divided and set out 
again. Salsify does very finely here, but is generally sown too late ; 
this is the proper month to sow the seed. The ground should be 
mellow and have been manured last s[)ring. It should be spaded up 
very deeply, as the size and smoothness of the roots depend upon the 
preparation of the soil. 

Water the Celery with soap suds, and if the season has been favor- 
able by the end of this month, some may be earthed up. 

Sow Kye, Barley and Red Oats, Orchard Grass, Red and White 
Clover, and Alfalfa Clover. Strawberry plants should be transplanted ; 
they cannot be left in the same spot three or four years, as is done 
North. The Wilson's Albany, and Longworth's Prolific, are the favorite 
varieties for the market. 

The Wilson's Albany do not make many runners here, but they 
form a stool, something like the plants of violets, and these stools 
have to be taken up and divided. 



NOVEMBER. 

Continue to sow Spinach, Corn Salad, Radish, Lettuce, Mustard, 
Roquette, Parsley, Chervil, Carrots, Salsify, Parsnips, Cress and En- 
dive, also Turnips and Cabbage. Superior Flat Dutch and Improved 
Drumhead, sown in this month, make fine Cabbage in the spring. 

Artichoke should be dressed, if not already done last month. 

Sow Black Eye and other late varieties of Peas. Frost does not 
hurt them as long as they are small, and during this time of the year 
they will grow but very slowly. English Beans can be planted ; frost 
does not hurt them, and, if not planted soon, they will not bear much. 

Manure for hot-beds should be looked after, and ought not to be 
over one month old. It should be thrown together in a heap, and, 
when heated, forked over again, so the long and short manure will be 
well mixed. The first vegetables generally sown in the hot-beds are 



98 



Filcliord Frotscliers Almanac and Garden Manval 



Cucumbers : it is best to start them in two or three inch pots, and when 
they have twn roiv-i-li l^T'aves. transplant tliem to their pkice ; two good 
plants are sufficient under every sash. 

DECEMBER. 

Xot a great deal is ]'lanted during this nK>nth. as the ground is 
generally ()C(ji;pied Ijy the growing crops. 

Plant Peas for a general crop : some Potatoes may be risked, but 
it is uncertain whether they will sticceed or not. 

Sow Spinach. Eo-piette. Eadish. Carrots. Lettuce. Endive and Cab- 
bage. 

Early varieties of Cauliflower can be sown in a frame or sheltered 
situati'jn. to be transplanted in Eebruary into the open ground. Early 
Cabbages, such as Y'irk. Oxheart and Winningstadt, may be sown. 

To those wliM wish lo force Tomatoes. I will say that this is the 
month to sow them. The best kind for that purpose is the Extra Early 
Dwarf Eed. It is really a good aci"iui-iti<:in : it is very dwarfish, very 
productive, and uf g.jod size, and V)ears tlie fruit in clusters, but will 
sell only for the lirst. as the fruit is not so large as the Livingston 
varieties, which come in later. 




For the Southern States. 



99 



FLOWER SEEDS. 



The following- list of Flower seeds is not very large, but it contains 
all which is desirable and which will do well in the Southern climate. 
I import them from one of the most celebrated growers in Prussia, 
and they are of the best quality. There are very few or no flower 
seeds raised in this country, and Northern houses, which publish 
large lists and catalogues, get them from just the same sources as 
myself; but they, on an average, sell much higher than I do. Some 
varieties, which are bi-ennial in Europe or North, flower here the first 
season ; in fact, if they do not, they generally do not flower at all, as 
they usually are destroyed by the continued long heat of summer. 
Some kinds grow quicker here and come to a greater perfection than 
in a more Northern latitude. 

Flower seeds require a little more care in sowing than vegetable 
seeds. The ground should be well pulverized and light enough not to 
bake after a rain. Some of the more delicate and finer varieties are 
better sown in boxes or seed pans, where they can be better handled 
and protected froin hard rains or cold weather; the other kinds do 
not transplant well, and are better sown at once where they are to 
remain, or a few seeds may be sown in small pots to facilitate trans- 
l)lanting into the garden without disturbing the plants, when large 
enough. Some have very fine seeds, which the mere pressing of the 
hand or spade to the soil will cover; others may be covered one-foilrth 
of an inch, according to their size. Watering should be done care- 
fully, and if not done with a syringe, a watering pot, where the holes 
of the spout are very fine, should be used. 

By setting the plants out, or sowing the seeds in the border, con- 
sideration should be taken of the height, so that the taller varieties 
may be in the middle and the dwarf kinds on the edge of the bed. 

The seeds are put up at ten cents a package, fifteen packages for 
one dollar, except a few rare or costly kinds, where the price is noted. 
All flower seeds in packages are mailed free of postage to the pur- 
chaser. Where there is more than one color, I generally import them 
mixed, as I find that most of my customers do not wish to purchase 
six packages, or more, of one variety, in order to get all the colors. 
One package of Asters, Zinnia, Phlox, Chinese Pink, German Stocks, 
Petunia, Portulaca, and others, will always contain an equal mixture 
of the best colors. 



100 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manvai 



Althea Rosea. Hollyhock. This 
flower has been much improved of late 
years, and is very easily cultivated. Can 
be sown from October till April. Very 
hardy ; from four to six feet high. 

Alyssiiiii inaritimuim. Sweet 
Alyssum. Very free flowering plants, 
about siK inches high, with white 
flowers ; very fragrant. Sow from October 
till April. 

Antirliiiium niajus. Snapdragon. 
Choice mixed. Showy plant of various 
colors. About two feet high. Should be 
sown early, if perfect flowers are desired. 
Sow from October till March. 




Althea Rosea. 



Aster. Queen Margaret. German Quilled. Perfect double quilled 
flowers, of all shades, from white to dark purple and crimson. One 
and a half feet high. 




Gsrman Quilled Aster. 




Trufaut's PcGony-Flowered Aster. 



Aster, l^rufaut's Pseony-Flowered Perfection. Large double 
pseony-shaped flowers, of fine mixed colors ; one of the best varieties. 
Two feet high ; sow from December till March. Asters should be sown 
in a box or in pots, and kept in a green-house, or near a window ; when 
large enough, transplant into the border. Take a shovel of comi:>ost 
and mix with the ground before planting. Put three to four plants 
together, and they will show better. They can be cultivated in pots. 



For the Southern States. 



101 





Adonis autumualis. 



Amarantlius caudatus. 



Adonis aiituiniialis. Flos Adonis 
or Pheasant's Eye. Showy crimson flower, 
of long- duration. One foot high. Sow from 
November till April. 

Amarantlius caudatus. Love Lies 
Bleeding. Long red racemens with blood 
red flowers. Very graceful ; three feet high. 

Amaranthus tricolor. Three colored 
Amaranth. Very showy; cultivated on 
account of its leaves, which are green, 
yellow and red. Two to three feet high. 

Amaranthus bicolor. Two colored 
Amaranth. Crimson and green variegated 
foliage ; good for edging. Two feet high. 




Amaranthus tricolor. 





Amaranthus Salicifolius, Fountain Plant. 



Double Daisy. 



102 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Aiiiaraiitliiis Salictfoliiis. Fountain Plant. Eich colored 
foliage, very graceful. Five to six feet high. Sow from February till 
June. 




Aquilegia. or Columbine. 



Balsamina Camellia-Flowered. 



Aqiiileg^ia. Columbine. A showy and beautiful flower of differ- 
ent colors ; two feet high. Sow from October till March. Should be 
sown early if flowers are wished; if sown late will not bloom till next 
season. 

Balsamina Ilortcnsis. Lady Slipper. A well known flower 
of easy culture. Requires good ground to produce double flowers. 

. Balsamina. Improved Camellia-flowered. Very double and 
beautiful colors. The strain which I offer of this variety is very fine ; 
but to have them perfe- ., they should not be sown too soon. In rich 
ground and during dry weather they reijuire plenty of water. 

Balsamina camellia flora alba. Pure white flowers, used 
for bouquets ; about two feet high. Sow from February till August. - 

Bellis Percnnis. Daisy. Finest double mixed variety; four 
inches high. From October till January. 

Cacaliacoccinca. Scarlet Tassel Flower. A profuse flowering 
plant, with tassel-shaped flowers in cluster; one and a half feet. Sow 
from February till May. 



For the Southern States. 



103 




Cc'l(jsia (.-ristata. 




Cacalia coccinca. 



Calendula officinalis. Pot Marigold. A plant which, in-operly 
speaking, Vjelongs to the aromatic herbs, but sometimes cultivated 
for the flowers, which vary in different shades of yellow; one and a 
half feet high. From January till April. 

Celosia cristata. Dwarf Cock's-comb. Well known class of 
flowers which are very ornamental, producing large heads of crimson 
and yellow flowers ; one to two feet high. Sow from February till 
August. 





raleudula officinalis. 



Cheriaiithus Cberi. 



Clicrianthus Ciierj. Wall Flower This flower is highly 
esteemed in some parts of Europe, but does not grow very perfectly 
her^, and seldom pro luces the large spikes of double, flowers which 
are very fragrant. Two feet high. November till March. 



104 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Campanula speciilum. Bell-Flower, or Venus' Looking- 
Glass. Free flowering plants of different colors, from white to dark 
blue ; one foot high. Sow from December till March. 





Centaurea cyanus. Centaurea suavolens. 

Centaiirea cyanus. Bottle Pink. A hardy annual of easy 
culture, of various colors ; two feet high, 

Centaurea suavolens. Yellow, Sweet Sultan. December to 
April. 

Cineraria liybrida. A beautiful green-house plant. Seed 
should be sown in October or November, and they will flower in 
spring. Per package, 25 cents. 

Cineraria marititna. A handsome border plant, which is culti- 
vated on account of its silvery white leaves. Stands our summer well. 

Coleus. A well known and beautiful bedding plant, which can 
be easily propagated by seeds which produce different shades of 
colored plants. 

]>ianttius Barbatus. Sweet William. A well known plant 
which has been much improved of late years. Their beautiful colors 
make them very showy. Should be sown early, otherwise they will 
not flower the first spring ; one and a half feet high. October till Aijril. 





Diauthus barbatus. 



Dianthus chiuensis, double. 



For the Southern States. 



105 



Diaiitlius Oliiiiensis. Chinese Pink. A beautiful class of 
annuals of various colors, which flower very profusely in early spring 
and summer ; one foot high. From October till April. 

Diaiithiis Ileddcvvig'g'Bi. Japan Pink. This is the most showy 
of any of the annual pinks. The flowers are very large and of brilliant 
colors ; one foot high. Sow from October till April. 




^mii^sNf- 




Dianthus Heddewiffgii. 



Dianthus Caryophyllus. 



Diaiitlius plumaris. Border Pink. A fragrant pink used for 
edging. The flowers are tinged, generally pink or white, with a dark 
eye. Does not flower the first year; two feet high. Sow from Janu- 
ary till April. 




Dianthus Picotee. 




Earlv Dwarf Double Carnation Pink 



106 



Richard Frotsclier^s Almanac and Garden Manual 






Diantlius caryophyllus. Carnation Pink. Tliis is a well 
known and highlj^ esteemed class of flowers. They are doable, of 
different colors, and very fragrant; can be sown either in fall or 
spring ; should be shaded during mid-summer and protected from hard 
rains ; three to four feet high. November till April. 

Diaiitliiis Picotee. Finest hybrids. Stage flowers saved from 
a collection of over ouu named varieties ; per package, 50c. 

I>lautbus puiuila. Early dwarf flowering Carnation Pink. If 
sown early this variety will flower the first season. They are quite 
dwarfish and flower very profusely. November till April. 

DelpliJiiiuui IiuperialJs, II. pi. Imperial flowering Larksiuir. 
Very handsome variety of symmetrical form. Mixed colors; bright 
red, dark blue and red stripes ; liteet high. 

I>elpliiiiiuiii ajacis. Eocket 
Larkspur. Mixed colors ; very showy ; 
two and a half feet. 

Delpliiuiuiii Cliiiicu§i$. Dwarf 
China Larkspur. Mixed colors; very 
pretty; one foot high. November till 
ApriL 

Note.— None of the above three va- 
rieties transplant well, and are better 
sown at once where they are intended • 
to remain. 

Dalilia. Large Flowering Dahlia. 
Seed sown in the spring will flower by 
June. Yery pretty colors are obtained 
from seed; the semi-double or single 
ones can be pulled up as thej^ bloom ; 
but those seeds which are saved from fine doable varieties will pro- 
duce a good per centage of double flowers. February till Jane. 

Esclisclioltzia Californica. California Poppy. A very free 
flowering plant, good for masses. Does not transplant well. One 
foot high.. December till April. 








^-^^ 






Delphinium Cbiiiensis. 





Gaillardia bieolor. 



Turplo Globe Amaranth. 



For the Southern States. 



107 



Oaillai'dia bicoloi*. Two colonHl (liiillaidia. Very showy 
plants, which coiilinue to Howcr for a k:)R,i;- time. Flowers red, bor- 
dered with orange yellow. One and a half feet liigli. January till 
April. 

€rillia. Mixe 1 Gillia. IJvvarf plants, which flower freely of vari- 
ous colors. One foot. December till April. 

Ooinplii'ciia alba ami B>uri>iiroa. White and Crimson Batch- 
elor Button or Globe Amaranth. Well known variety of flowers ; very 
early and free flowering ; continue to flower for a long time. Two 
feet high. From February till August. 




Gerjiuiinii Zonak 



Ooraniuiii Zoiialc. Zouale Geranium. Seed saved from large 
flowering varieties of different colors ; should be sown in seed pans, 
and when large enough transplanted into pots, where they can be left, 
or transplanted in spring into the open ground. 

OeraniuBii pelargoniuiBi. Large flowering Pelargonium. 
Spotted varieties, 25 cents per package. 



108 Elchard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



'■'^f^. 



'^^4 



fM 



>jy^' 




Gercinium Pelargonium. 



Geranium odoratissiuia. Apple-scented Geranium. Culti- 
Tated on account of its fragrant leaves ; 25 cents per package. Both of 
these kinds are pot plants, and require shade during hot weather. 
Should be sown during fall and winter. 




Heliotropium. 



Hsliehrvsum monstrosum album. 



For the Southern States. 



109 



Oypsopliila pan icii lata. Gypsophila. A graceful plant with 
white flowers, which can be used for bouquets. One foot high. From 
December to April. 

Ilcliotropiuni. Mixed varieties with dark and light shaded 
flowers. A well k)iown plant, esteemed for the fragrance of its flowers, 
which are produced during the whole summer in great profusion. 
This plant is generally propagated by cuttings, but can also be raised 
from seed. Should be sown in a hot-bed if sown early. 

Hclicliiy^uin iiioiistrosiiin album. White Everlasting 
Flower. Very showy double flowers. One and a half feet high. 

Heliclirysiiiii nionstrosiiiii riibruni. Ked Everlasting 
Flower. Very ornamental. One and a half feet high. December till 
April. Does not transplant well. 

Hcliaiithus fl. pi. Double Flowering Sunflower. A well known 
plant, with showy yellow flowers. The double is often cultivated in 
the flower garden. The single varieties are cultivated mostly for the 
seed. They are said to be anti-malarious. Four feet high. February 
till May. 

Ibcris aiiiara. White Candytuft. A well known plant raised a 
good deal by florists for bouquets. Can be sown at different times to 
have a succession of flowers. One foot high. 

Ibcris umbclata rosea. Purple Candytuft. One foot. Octo- 
ber till April. 

Liiniam g-raiidifloriiin rubrum. Scarlet Flax. A very pretty 
plant for masses or borders, with bright scarlet flowers, dark in the 
centre. One foot. January till Ai^ril. 




Lobelia crinus. 




-Mathiola annua. 



Lobelia eriiiiis. Lobelia. A very 
and blue flowers, well adapted for hangin; 
foot. October till March. 



graceful i)]ant with wdiite 
baskets or border. Half 



110 



Bkliard Fi'otschei''s Almanac and Garden Manual 



L.y€huis clialcedoiiicu. Lychnis. 
Xi-ee plants with scarlet, white and rose 
flowers. Two feet. December till April. 

Liipiuu^. Lui)inas. Plants with 
s['ikes of flowers of various colors. Should 
be sown soon. Does not transplant well. 
Two feet. December till March. 

lYIatliiola auuiia. Ten weeks Stocks. 
This is one of the finest annuals in culliva- 
lion. Lar^e flowers of all colors, from white 
to dark blue or crimson. Should be sown in 
pots or pans, and when large enough trans- 
planted into rich soil. One and a quarter 
feet. October till March. 

rrie^-eiiibryaiitlieniiiiii crystalli- 
Hiiiu. Ice Plant. Xear ]ilant with icy 




iv.h-: 



Good fo: 



laskets or beds. 



looking folia-.^e. It is of spreading habit 
One foot. February till March. 

.lliiiinlii^ ti^riaus. Monkey flower. Showy flowers of yellow 
and browa. Should be sown in a shad5' i>lace. Doe? not transplant 
well. Half foot. December till March. 












v 



Ice Plant. Double Matricaria. 

llatricaria capeiisis. Double Matricaria. White double 
flowers, resembling the Daisy, but smaller; are fine for bouquets: 
blooms very nearly the whole summer. Two feet. December till 
Maro]i. 

ITIiuio^a piidica. Sensitive Plant. A curious and interesting 
pl-mt which folds up its leaves when touched. One foot. February 
till .June. '" . 

llirabilis jalapa. Marvel of Peru. A well known plant of 
easy culture ; ]>roducing flowers of various colors. It forms a root 
which can be preserved from one year to another. Februarv till June. 
Three feet. 

^lyosoti-* palustri^. Forcret-me not A fln? little plant with 
small, blue, star-like flowers. Should have a moist, shady situation. 
Does not succeed so well here as in Europe, of which it is a native. 
Hall foot high. Decemder till March. 



For the Southern States. 



Ill 





Blue Grove Love. Petunia bybrida. 

Ncsnopliila. Iti$ig:ii is. Blue Grove Love. Plants of easy culture, 
very pretty and profuse bloomers. Bright blue with white centre. 
One foot high. 




Nigella damascena 





CEnotlK 



Lamarckiana. 



Papaver ranunculus flowered. 



Nemopliiila inaciilnta. 

Large white flowers spotted with 
violet. One foot high. December 
till April. 

Nig^clla claiiBasccDin. 

Love in a Mist. Plants of easy 
culture, with light blue flowers. 
Does not transi)lant well. One 
foot high. December till April. 

Niercmberssria i;^racilis. 

Nierembergia.. Nice plants with 
delicate foliage, and white flow- 
ers tinted with lilac. One foot 
high. November till April. 

<£iiotBicra JLaiiiarckia- 

na. Evening Primrose. Showy, 
large yellow flowers. December 
till April. Two feet high. 



112 Eichard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Papaver j^oiiiniferum. Double flo^Yering Poppy. Of different 
colors ; very showy. 

Papaver ranunculus flowered. Double fringed flo\Yers ; 
very showy. Cannot be transplanted. Two feet high. October till 
March. 




Phlox Dnimmondii grandiflora. 



For the Southern States. 



113 



Petunm liylirida. Petunia. Splendid mixed hybrid varieties. 
A very decorative plant of various colors, well known to almost every 
lover of flowers. Plants are of spreading habit, about one foot high. 
January till May. 

Petunia flora pletio. Large double flowering varieties. They 
are hybridized with the finest strains, and will give from 20 to 25 per 
cent, of double flowers. Very handsome ; 25 cents per package. Janu- 
ary till March. 

Phlox Druuiiiiondii. Drummond's Phlox. One of the best and 
most popular annuals in cultivation. Their various colors and length 
of flowering, with easy culture, make them favorites with every one. 
All fine colors mixed. One foot high. December till April. 

Plilox Driimiiiondii grandiflora. This is an improvement 
on the above ; flowers are larger, with white centre, different colors. 
Very beautiful. One foot high. December till April. 

Portulaca. A small 
plant of great beauty, and 
of the easiest culture. Does 
best in a well exposed situa- 
tion, where it has plenty of 
sun. The flowers are of 
various colors, from white 
to bright scarlet and crim- 
son. The plant is good for 
edging vases or pots ; or 
where large plants are kept 
in tubs, the surface can be 
filled with this neat little 
genus of plants. Half foot 
high. February till August. 

PortBiSaca g^randi- 
flora fl. pi. Double Portu- 
laca. The same variety of 
colors with semi-double and 
double flowers. Half foot 
Double Portulaca. high. February till August, 






Primula veris. 



Scabiosa nana. 



114 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Primula veris. Polyanthus, An herbaceous plant of various 
colors, highly esteemed in Europe. Half foot high. December till 
April. 

Primula cliinensis. Chinese Primrose. A green-house plant, 
which flowers profusely and continues to bloom for a long time ; 
should be sown early to insure the plant flowering well. Different 
colors ; mixed, per package, 25 cents. One and a half feet high, Oc- 
tober till February. 

Pyretlirum aurea. Golden 
Feather. The flowers resemble Asters. 
It has bright yellow leaves which make 
it very showy as a border if massed with 
plants, such as Coleus, etc. 

Reseda odorata. Sweet Migno- 
nette. A fragrant plant and a favorite 
with everybody. One foot high. 

Reseda g^randillora. Similar to 
the above plant and flower, spikes lar- 
ger. Fifteen inches. December till 
April. 

8eal>iosa nana. Dwarf Mourn- 
ing Bride. Plants of double flowers of 
various colors. One foot high. Decem- 
ber till April. 

Saponaria calabriea. Soapwort. A very free flowering an- 
nual, of easy culture, resembling somewhat in leaves the Sweet 
William. One and a half feet high. December till April, 

Salvia eoccinea splendens. Scarlet Salvia or Eed Flower- 
ing Sage. A pot or green-house plant, but which can be grown as an 
annual, as it flowers freely from seed the first year. Two to three feet 
high. February till April. 

Silene Armeria. Lobel's Catchfly. A free blooming plant of 
easy culture ; flowers almost anywhere. Ked and white. One and a 
half feet high. 




(^S^io^Ai 



Reseda odorata. 





Tagetes Erecta. 



Tasetes Patula. 



For the Southern States. 



115 



Tagetes erecta. African or Tall-growing Marigold. Very 
showy annuals for borders, with bright yellow flowers growing upright. 
One and a half feet high. 

Tagetes patiila. French or Dwarf Marigold. A very compact 
dwarf growing variety, covered with yellow and brown flowers. One 
and a half feet high. January till April. 

Torenia Foiirnicri. 

A plant from Mexico of 
recent introduction, but 
which has become very 
popular in a short time. 
It stands the heat well, is 
well adapted to pot cul- 
ture, and makes one of the 
most valuable bedding- 
plants we have. The flow- 
ers are of a sky blue color, 
with three spots of dark 
blue. The seeds are very 
fine and take a good while 
to germinate. It trans- 
plants very easily. 

Verbena liybrida. 

Hybridized Verbena. A 
well known and favorite 
flower for borders. Their 
long flowering and great 
diversity of color make 
them valuable for every 
garden, however small. 
All colors mixed. One 
and a half feet high. 
January till April. 

Verbena Striped 
Italian. These are beau- 
tiful striped kinds of all 
colors with large eyes. 

Verbena Niveni. 
White Verbena. Pure 
white Verbena of more 
or less fragrance. One 
and a half feet high. 
January till April. 




Torenia Fournieri. 





Striped Italian Verbenj 



Vinca rosea and alba. 



116 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Viiica rosea and alt>a« Eed and 

White PeriwiDkle. Plants of shining 
foliage, with white and dark rose colored 
flowers, which are produced the whole 
summer and autumn. Two feet high. 
February till April. 

Viola o4orata. Sweet Yiolet. 
Well known edging plant, which gener- 
ally is propagated by dividing the plants ; 
but can also be raised from seed. Half 
foot high. Sow from January till March. 




Hybridized Verbena. 




^^^li^-^^' 




ftNOOUR^^g 



Double Zinnia. 



For the Southern States. 




117 



Viola tricolor tnaxi- 
iiia. Large flowering 
choicest Pansy, This is one 
of the finest little plants in 
cultivation for pots or the 
open ground. They are of 
endless colors and mark- 
ings. When planted in the 
garden, they will show bet- 
ter if planted in masses, and 
a little elevated above the 
level of the garden. Half 
foot high. October until 
March. 

Large Triniardcaii 
Pansy. This is the largest 
variety in cultivation; the 
flowers are well formed, 
generally three spotted ; 
quite distinct; the plants 
grow compact. Packages 
25c. 

Zinania eleg^aiis fl. ])l. 
Choicest Large English Pansy. Double Zinnia. Plants of 

very easy culture, flowering very profusely through the whole sum- 
mer and fall ; producing double flowers of all colors, almost as large 
as the flower of a Dahlia. Three feet high. February till August. 



I 




Large Trimardeau i^ausy, 



lis 



Elchard Frotacher' s Almanac and Garden Manual 



CLIMBING PLANTS. 



Benincasa cerifera. Wax Gourd. A strong growing vine 
with long sliaped dark crimson fruit, whicli lool^s very ornamental. 
It is used for preserves. 





Balloon Vine. Climbing Cobfea. 

Cardiospermiini. Balloon Yine. A quick-growing climber, 
the seeds of which are in apod shaped like a miniature balloon, there- 
fore the name. 

Cobsea §caiideiis. Climbing Cob^ea. Large purple bell shaped 
flowers. Should be sown in a hot-bed, and not kept too moist. Place 
the seed edgewise in the ground. Twenty feet high. January till 
April. 




Mornins: Glorv. 




Mixed Thiinber^ia. 



Convolvulus luajor. Morning Glory. Well known vine with 
various handsomely colored flowers, of easy culture. Grows almost 
anywhere. Ten feet high. February till July. 

Curcurbita. Ornamental Gourd. Mixed varieties or Ornamen- 
tal Gourds of different shapes and sizes. February till May. 



"^ "■"'-'- '■"■'■ 



For the Southern States. 



119 




Hyacinth Bean. 

Beautiful flowers of all 
Six feet hi^h. December 



Curcurbitalag^enariadulcis. Sweet Gourd. A strong grow- 
ing vine of which the young fruits are used like Squash. February 
till April. 

Doliclios L<ablab. Hyacinth 
Beans. Free growing plant, with pur- 
ple and white flowers. ' March till 
April. 

Iponiiea i^uamoclit rosea. 
Red Cypress Vine. Very beautiful, 
delicate foliage, of rapid growth, with 
scarlet flowers. 

IpomaBa Quamoclit alba. 
White Cypress Vine. The same as the 
foregoing kind, except white flowers. 
February till August. 

IpomaeaBonaNox. Large Flow- 
ering Evening Glory. A vine of rapid 
growth, with beautiful blue and white 
flowers which open in the evening. 
Twenty feet high. February till June. 

Liathyrus odoratus. Sweet Peas, 
colors, very showy. Good for cut flowers, 
till April. 

Maurandia Barclayana. Mixed Maurandia. A slender 
growing vine of rapid growth. Rose, purple and white colors mixed. 
Ten feet high. February till April. 

Iflamordica Balsamina. Balsam Apple. A climbing plant 
of very rapid growth, producing Cucumber-like fruits, with warts on 
them. They are believed to contain some medicinal virtues. They 
are put in jars with alcohol, and are used as a dressing for cuts, 
bruises, etc. 

LiUffa acutangriila. Dish Rag Vine. A very rapid growing 
vine of the Gourd family. When the fruit is dry, the fibrous sub- 
stance, which covers the seeds, can be used as a rag. February till 
April. 

Scchium edulc. Vegetable Pear or Mirliton. A rapid growing- 
vine with grape-like leaves, of w^hich the fruit is eaten ; there are two 
varieties, white and green. It has only one seed, and the whole fruit 
has to bo planted. 

Tropseolum majus. Nasturtium. Trailing plants with ele- 
gant flowers of different shades, mostly yellow and crimson, which are 
produced in great abundance. Four feet high. February till April. 

Thunberg^ia. Mixed Thunbergia. Very ornamental vines, with 
yellow bell-shaped flowers, with dark eye. Six feet high. February 
till May. 



120 



Eichard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



BULBOUS ROOTS, 



Aueniolies. Double flower- 
ing. Planted and treated the same 
as the Eanunculus. They are of 
great varieties in color. 
Double Dutch, 40 cts. per dozen. 
Freach, 50 " '" 

Dahlias. Fine double-named 
varieties. Plants so well known 
for their brilliancy, diversity of 
colors and profuse flowering quali- 
ties, that they require no recom- 
mendation. They can be planted 
from February till lEay ; they thrive 
best in rich loamy soil. They 
should be tied up to stakes, which, 
ought to be driven into the ground 
before or when planting them. To 
have them flower late in the season 
they should be planted late in the 
spring, and the flower buds nipped 
off when they appear; treated in 
this way, they will produce perfect 
flowers during fall. Undivided 
roots, S3. 00 per dozen. 




Anemones. 




Dahlias. 



For the Southern States. 



121 



Gladiolus. Hybrid 
Gladiolus. One of the best 
summer flowering bulbs ; 
they have been greatly im- 
proved of late years, and 
almost every color has been 
produced ; is tinged and 
blotched in all shades from 
delicate rose to dark Ver- 
million, When planted at 
intervals during spring, they 
will flower at different 
times, but those that are 
planted earliest produce the 
finest flowers. The roots 
should be taken up in the 
fall. 

Hybrids mixed, first 
choice, 10c. each ; 75c. per 
dozen. 

Hybrids, white ground, 
1st choice, 10c. each; $1.00 
per dozen. 




Hybrid Gladiolus. 




Gloxinia? 



Oloxinias. These are 
really bulbous green-house 
plants, but they can be cul- 
tivated in pots and kept in 
a shady place in the garden, 
or window. They are very 
beautiful ; color from white 
to dark violet and crimson. 
The leaves are velvety, and 
on some varieties very large. 
They should be planted early 
in spring; require sandy 
ground and a good deal of 
moisture during flowering 
time. French Hybrids, strong 
bulbs, $3.00 per dozen. 



Hyacinths. (Dutch.) Double and single. The Hyacinth is a 
beautiful flowering bulb, well suited for open ground or pot culture. 
They should be planted from October till February. If planted in 
pots it is well to keep in a cool, rather dark place, till they are well 
started, when they can be placed in the full light and sun. Double 
and single, 15 cents each ; $1.50 per dozen. 



122 B'lchard Frotsclier's Almanac and Garden Manual 





Double Hvacinth. 



Single Hyacinth. 



Liiliiiiii tig:riiiuiii. Tiger Lily. A well known yariety, very 
showy and of easy culture ; 10 cents each. 

Liliiiiii ti^rinuni fl. pi. This is a new variety; it is perfectly j 
double, and the petals are imbricated almost as regularly as a camel- 
lia flower. Xovel and fine, 15 cents each. 





Lilium Tigrinum fl. pi. 



Lilium lancifoliuni rubrum. 



For the Southern States. 



123 



JAPAN LILIES. 

Milium auratum. Golden 
Band Lily. This is a very hand- 
some lily ; the flowers are large 
and white, each petal having a 
yellow stripe. It is of easy cul- 
ture. A loamy, dry soil suits it 
best, and planted one inch deep. 
The past season I had occa- 
sion to see several of this noble 
lily in bloom, and it is really 
tine; half a dozen flowers open- 
ing at the sametinie,and measur- 
ing from six to nine inches 
across. It is very fragrant I ex- 
pect some fine bulbs, same as I 
had last year, imported direct 
from their native country. 

Flowering bulbs, 25c. each. 

Liiliuin lancifolium al- 
bum. Pure white, Japan Lily 
30 cents each. 

liilium 1 an cif ol i 11 in 
rubruin. White and red spot- 
ted, 15 cents each. 




Lilium auratum. 



Liilium lancifoliuni roseum, Kose spotted, 15c. each. 

These Japan Lilies are very beautiful and fragrant. Should be 
planted from October till January. Perfectly suited to this climate. 

Peeonia sinensis. Chinese or herbaceous Peeonia. Herba- 
ceous plants of different colors and great beauty; they should be 
planted during fall in a shady situation, as they fl-ower early in sj)ring. 
If planted too late they will not flower perfectly ; 40c. each. 





■Ranunculus. 



Scilla Peruvian; 



1-24 



Richard Fi^otscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



RauuuculU!^. Double Flowering. The roots can be planted 

during fall and winter, either in the open ground or in pots. The 
French Varieties are more robust than the Persian, and the flowers 
are larger. The ground should be rather dry, and if planted in the 
open ground, it will be well to have the spot a little higher than the 
bed or border. 

Persian Eanunculus 25 cents per dozen. 

French , " 40 '•' 

Scilla peruviana. These are green-house bulbs at the Xorth, 
but here they are hardy, and do well in the open ground. There are 
two varieties— the blue and white. They throw up a shoot, on the 
end of which the flowers appear, forming a truss. Plant from Octo- 
ber till Januarv. 30 cents each. 





Double Tulip. Single Tuiip. 

Tulips. Double and single Tulips thrive better in a more North- 
ern latitude than this, but some years they flower well here, and as 
they are cheap, a few flowering bulbs 
will pay the small amount they 
cost. They should not be planted later 
than December, and placed very shallow 
in the ground . not more than one-third 
of the bulb should be covered. When 
near flowering they require a good deal 
of moisture. Single and double, 50 
cents per dozen. 

Tuberoses. Double Flowering. 
They are ornamental for the garden, 
and very valuable for making bouquets, 
on account of their pure white color and 
great fragrance. Plant during the spring 
months. Strong bulbs, 10 cents each; 
75 cents per dozen. 




Tuberoses, double flowering. 



For the Southern States. 



125 



BOUQUET PAPERS. 

I keep a large and varied stock of bouquet papers, besides the 
different kinds enumerated below. I also have finer qualities, satin, 
velvet and tarleton, ranging from $1.5U to $4.50 each ; also, some new 
styles called Parisian, finished in the same excjuisite style as those 
above. They are very appropriate for bridal bouquets. 

PASTED CARTONS. 



I 




Measure includes the Lace 





Inches in 








Inches in 






No. 


diameter. 


per doz. 


per gross. 


No. 


diameter. 


per doz. 


per gross 


4 


U 


$0 15 


$1 50 


1622 


lU 


$0 60 


16 75 


523 


4| 


15 


1 75 


1671 


111 


60 


6 75 


1716 


5 


20 


2 00 


1919 


12 


60 


6 75 


531 


5i 


15 


1 75 


533 


12 


60 


7 00 


1823 


5i 


15 


1 75 


12 


12 


60 


7 00 


1688 


7 


25 


2 75 


1789 


12^^ 


60 


7 00 


1606 


7| 


30 


3 00 


1604 


13 


50 


6 00 


1648 


7.^ 


30 


3 25 


1760 


13 


60 


7 00 


1662 


8" 


35 


3 50 


1712 


13i 


70 


7 75 


518 


8 


35 


3 50 


1920 


13i 


90 


10 00 


1610 


8 


35 


3 50 


501 


14 


70 


7 50 


1682 


9 


40 


4 00 


1693 


15 


90 


10 00 


1685 


9 


40 


4 00 


1922 


15 


1 20 


13 50 


10 


91 


40 


4 25 


176 


15 


1 00 


11 00 


1609 


10 


50 


5 00 


549 


16 


80 


9 00 


1690 


10 


50 


4 75 


1923 


16 


1 50 


15 00 


1918 


m 


50 


5 00 


525 


18 


1 40 


12 00 


552 


105 


60 


5 00 


18 


18 


1 50 


15 00 


1677 


11 


60 


6 25 


507 


20 


1 50 


17 00 



ITALIANS, with 12 Scallops. 




per doz. 

SI 50 
1 60 
1 75 



126 



Bichard Fj^otscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



ITALIANS, with 24 Scallops. 







Measure exclusive of Lace. 



^o. 


Inches in 
diameter. 


each. 


per doz. 


No. 


Inches in 
diameter. 


each. 


per doz. 


53 

54 


6 

74 


$0 10 
15 


$1 00 
1 40 


73 


9 


$0 25 


$2 25 


76 


8i 


20 


1 80 


15 


12 


25 


2 50 



ITALIANS, with Gilt or Silver Lace, 12 Scallops. 

Measure exclusive of Lace. 

Inches in 1 

No. diameter. ' each. No. 

33 6 gilt, 25 cts. 33 

44 6| gilt and silver .25 cts. 13 

39 7 gilt, 30 cts. 15 



Inches in 
diameter. 



gilt, . . 
gilt, . . 

silver 



each. 

50 cts. 
50 Cts. 
. 50 cts. 




For the Southern States. 



127 



THE NEW YORK SEED DRILL. 

MATTHEWS' PATENT. 




I take pleasure in calling your attention to a perfect Seed Drill. 
This Drill was invented and perfected by the father of the seed-drill 
business— Mr. E. G. Matthews. It has been his aim for years to make 
a perfect drill and do away with the objections found in all others, and 
in the New York he has accomplished it. Its advantages over other 
drills are as follows ; 

1. Marker-bar under the frame, held by clamps, easy to adjust 
to any width by simply loosening thumb nuts. 

2. Adjustable plow, which opens a wide furrow, and can be set to 
sow at any depth. 

3. Open seed conductor to show seed dropping. 

4. Bars in seed conductor, for scattering seed in wide furrows, 
prevents disturbing strong plants when thinning out— an important 
feature. 

5. Eidged roller. 

6. Dial plate in full sight of operator, and made of patent com- 
bination white metal, which prevents rust. 

7. Dial plate set on fulcrum, and hence holds close up, preventing 
seed from spilling. 

8. It has a large seed- box with hinged cover. 

9. Machine will stand up alone when not in use, not liable to Up 
over. 

It is the SIMPLEST, MOST COMPACT and EASIEST DRILL TO 
HANDLE, being only 32 inches long. 

It covers the seed better and runs very easy. 

Packed in crates for shipping. Weight about 45 pounds. Price, 
$10 00. 



128 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



MATTHEWS' HAND CULTIVATOR. 

The Matthews' Hand Culti- 
vator is one of the best imple- 
ments in use for weeding be- 
tween row crops, and for flat 
cultivation generally, and is an 
indispensable companion to the 
seed drill. 

It is thoroughly constructed 
throughout, very durable ; easy 
to operate. A boy can do as much 
iciih it, as six men with hoes. It 
spreads from 6 to 14 inches, and will cut all the ground covered, even 
when spread to its greatest extent. Its teeth are of a new and im- 
proved pattern, and thoroughly pulverize and mellow the soil. The 
depth of cultivating may be accurately^'guaged by raising or lowering 
the wheels, which is quickly done by the use of a tumb screw. 




Price, .fe.OO, Boxed. 



THE CHAUTAUQUA CORN AND SEED PLANTER. 

Patented April 4, 1882. 

Unequalled in Simplicity, Durability and Efficiency. 

The Best is the Cheapest. Perfectly Simple. Simply Perfect. 

Directions: 

To set tlie seed c?/j9.— Loosen the set-screw and draw out the inside 
or narrow gauge far enough to drop the desired number of seeds. 
Then tighten the screw. For ordinary plant- 
ing, only the narrow gauge should be moved. 
In putting in phosphate, or a large quantity of 
seed, both the narrow and wide gauges should 
be drawn out together. By taking out the 
screws, the gauges may be drawn entirely out. 

In experienced or careful hands the 
machine will plant perfectly in any kind or 
condition of soil, mellow or soddy, dry or wet. 

To operate the planter.— VIslqq the blades in 
the ground to the desired depth, in advance of 
you, having the "step" to the front, as in the 
cut, without its touching the ground. Then 
pressing down and forward on the handle, walk 
foreward. The step will press on the ground 
and then the blades will be opened, the seed 
deposited in the ground, and a charge taken 
for the next hill. After walking past the plan- 
ter, still pressing on the handle, lift it from the :_ 
ground to place for the next hill ; as this is i 
done the charge of seed will be heard rattling 
down upon the steel blades, and the operator 



For the Southern States. 



129 



will ktiovv the seed is ready for the next hill. Use th(^ ])Iantor as you 
would a cane, or as much so as possible. The blfides rnuxt ahrai/s oiler 
the (jroirnd closed, mid come out open. 

Its EfficienG{j.~V^^<d claim that the "Chautauqua" is not ('(jualied as 
a droi)i)er and planter. By actual trial in the Held with a number of 
good planters, it has been shown that our machine will cover the seed 
in different soils and at different depths, shallow or deep, better than 
any other planter. Oar new and improved seed slide, having double 
gauges for adjusting the seed cup, enables the planter to drop accu- 
ratelij small or large seed in the quantity desired. 

Price, $2.25. 



GARDEN IMPLEMENTS. 




Loop Fdstenar, swing socket Scytho Snath. 




Ladies' Set, Floral Tools. Xo. 5. 




Bovs' Favorite Set. 



130 Bichard Froisclier's Almanac and Garden Manual 




Weeding: Hoe and Bake Combined. 



Cast Steel Garden Trowel. 




«traAvberry or Transplanting Fork. 



Spading Fork, D Handle. 




jixcfisior Weeding Hook. 




Saynor's Pruning Knife. No. l'J4. 




Savnor's Pruning Knil'c, No. 1 



For the Southern States. 



131 




Side Pruning Shears. 




^ ! 



Hedge Shea 



0. G. Hand Pruning Shear. 



Dutch, or Scuffle Hoe. 




Fre^eh Perfection Shear. 




Lang's Weeder. 



Wooda.son's Bellow.s. 



132 



Richard FroUcher's Alwaiiac duel Garden Manual 



PRICE LIST OF GAEDEN IMPLEMENTS. 



Improved American Garden Syringes. 

No. A (Small) $2 25 

No. 2 — Conservatory, with two extra roses 4 50 



No. 3— Green House 

No. 5— " 

No. 8- 



6 00 

7 50 

8 00 



^^ 



W 



HOES. 

i. Lyndon's Louisiana, No. 00— Field 

No. 0— ■' 

No. 1— " 

No. 2— " 

" '' No. 3— " 

A.. Lyndon's Louisiana, No. 0— Toy 

No. 1- " .... 

No. 2— " 

Broad, Field No. 000 

" No. 00 

" No. 0. 

C. A. Maynard's No. 2 

No. 4 

Briggs & Witte's Palmetto No. 2 

No. 3. ... 

Two Pronged German Forged Steel .... ... 

Iron City Grub No. 1 

Champion with handle 

Socket with handle - . 

Two Pronged Weeding, with handle. 

Magic Hoe, with handle ...... 

Hexamer Prong, with handle 

Solid Shank Cotton, with handle, No. 00 . . 

" Planter, •'• " 

Tiffin Patent Adjustable, No. 1 with handle 

No. 2 •• 

No. 4 '' 

German Pattern Garden, No. 7/0 " 

No. 5/0 " 

No. 3/0 with handle 

No. 1/0 " " 

No. 2 " '' 

No. 4 '• " 

Grub or Sprouting, No. 7/0 with handle 

No. 5/0 " 
Two Prong Grape, with handle 



40c, 50c and 
40e and 



80 
85 

90 

1 00 
1 10 
75 
75 
80 
45 
50 
55 
55 
65 
40 
45 
60 
80 
75 
60 
50 

75 

1 25 
50 
60 
55 
65 
75 
35 
a 40 
40 
45 
50 
55 
45 
50 
75 



For the Southern States. 133 



RAKES. 

Cast Steel, 6 teeth $0 30 

" 10 " 40 

" 12 " 50 

" 14 " 60 

" IG " 70 

Challenge Eakes, (Malleable Iron) 10 teeth 30 

12 " 40 

14 teeth . . 45 

16 " . . 50 

Wooden Head, (12 Iron teeth) 50 

Wooden Hay Eakes 25c and 30 

English Rod-Iron Eakes (10 teeth), without handle 50 

" (16 " ) *' " 65e and 80 

SPADES. 

Ames' Long Handled (extra heavy) 1 10 

Ames' " " Bright V 90 

Rowlands' Long Handled 75 

Jackson " " Bright 80 

French Steel, Bright, without handles |1 00 to 1 15 

SHOVELS. 

Rowland's Short Handled (square) 75 

Ames' Bright Long Handled, (round point) ... 90 

Rowland's Long Handled, (round point) 75 

Rowland's " '■ (square) 75 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Handles for French Scythe Blades (with Ring and Wedge) 90 

Xo. 0, Plate Heel, slip ring 65 

No. 00, Patent Loop Fastener ....:.........;..;-. 75 

SICKLES. 

English (welded), No. 2 40 

No. 3 45 

Scotch (riveted back, ) No. '. 50 

No. 1 60 

No. 2 50 

No. 3 60 

No. 4 75 

No. 1 C 40 

No. 2 .. 45 

SHEARS. 

Hedge Shears, 8 inches . . 1 75 

10 '' ... 2 00 

Pruning Shears No 1, (Weiss) 2 00 

No. 2, " 1 75 

No. 3, " .. ......... :... 1 50 

O. G. No. 2 1 50 

" " American Sheeptoe .... 75 

" " French Perfection No. 1 . — 2 75 

No. 2 2 50 

No. 3 2 25 



English 



French Sickles 



131 FciChard Frotschers Almanac and Garden Manual 



Slide Pruning Shear.. Xo. 1 = S2 oQ 

" Xo. 2 3 00 

''• Xo. 3 3 50 

Xo. 4 4 00 

KNIVES. 

Union Knife Go's Budding, ^ wooden handles') 75 

Geo. Wostenholnaes " (white bone handle) Xo. 1, $1 00; Xo. 2. 1 25 

H. (S: J. W. King's Pruning - from 60c to 1 25 

Saynor & Cook's " from 75c to 1 00 

Saynor & Cook's Budding $1 00 and 1 25 

Aaron Burkinshaw's Pruning and Budding from 40c to 80 

FORKS. 

Oxford Spading. Long Handled 75 

I strapped,! 80 

Spading Short Handled < strapped) $1 00 to 1 25 

Manure Improved Ferrule Long Handled, 6 tine (strapped' 1 30 

Enterprise Long Handled 4 tine Tstrappedj .- 70 

Premium " " 4 tine '"' 70 

Premium Short Handled 4 tine 50 

POTATO HOOKS. 

Long Handled, 6 tine - . 65 

4 tine iflati .... 50 

4 tine i round I 50 

SCYTHES. 

French. First Quality i polished , 22 inches - 90 

24 " 1 OO 

26 '• 1 15 

28 •• .... 1 25 

Second Quality 'blue.i 22 " ..... SO 

24 '•' 90 

2'? •■ 1 00 

2* •• 1 10 

American Grass . - - - 75 

Blood's Champion Grass - 75 

Bramble . . 75 

The French Scythe Blades are imported by me, and are of the 
best quality; none better can be had. 

FLORAL TOOLS. 

The Boy"s Favorite— Hoe. Spade and Pake 2 00 

Xo. 5—4 pieces. Hoe, Pake. Spade and Fork Ladies' Set ' 1 00 

TREE PRUNERS. 

Length of Pole, 8 feet, weight 3^ pounds 2 25 

- ''• 10 " '^ d " 2 50 

Extra Knives each 30 



For the Southern States. 135 



PRUNING SAWS. 

Diston's 12 inch No. 7 SO 90 

" Compass 12 inch, 50 

Crescent 12 " 75 

Duplex 16 " 100 

Avery's Duplex 18 " 100 

Brown's 18 inch ,. 75 

WOODASON'S BELLOWS. 

Double Cone (for insect powder) 4 00 

Single " " " 1 00 

Atomizer (for liquid and powder) 2 00 

Pure Pyrethrum Powder for above bellows i>er box 50 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Excelsior Weeding Hooks 025 

American Transplanting Trowels 10c to 20 

English " " 7 inch . 50 

Diston's Transplanting Trowels, (solid shank) 6 inch 45 

Enterprise " " " 20 

Transplanting Forks, (Steel) 35 

(Malleable Iron) 20c and 25 

English Bill or Briar Hooks 1 00 

Lang's Hand Weeder 30 

Patent Adjustable Tool Handle, with 4 pieces 75 

Toy Spades 40 

Toy Shovels 50 

Dutch or Scuffle Hoes 45c and 50 

Philadelphia Broadcast Seed Sower , G 00 

Western Files, 12 inch (flat) 35 

Fork Handles . . 20 

Hoe Handles 15c and 20 

Rake Handles 15 

Spade and Shovel Handles 25 

Trowbridge's Grafting Wax per lb, 40c : per \ lb. 15 

Scotch Whetstones 20 

American Indian Pond Whetstone 10 

French Whetstone 10c to 15 

WATERING POTS. 

G Quarts, Japanned 45 

8 " •' 55 

II) " " G5 

12 " " . 80 

1'^ " " .. 1 30 

Extra Heavy, (hand made) SI 25, 1 50, 1 75 and 2 00 

These are made of the best material, and have very fine rose heads ; 
they are made by a mechanic who has been furnishing the vegetable 
gardeners for years with these pots, and has improved upon them 
until they are perfect for the purpose. 



136 Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Having received many enquiries on the culture of Alfalfa, I reprint 
the following letter, written by E. M. Hudson, Esq., a close observer 
on the subject, to give information thereon : 

YlLLA FrIEDHEIM, 

Mobile Coiintif, Ala., September 7, 1S7S. 
Mr. E. Feotscher, New Orleans, La. : 

Dear Sir -. — l^our letter of the 3d inst. has just reached me, and I 
cheerfully comply witn your request to give you the results of my ex- 
l)eriments with Lucerne or Alfalfa, and my opinion of it as a forage 
plant for the South. 

I preface my statement with the observation that my experiments 
have been conducted on a naturally poor, piney woods soil (which 
would be classed as a sandy soil), varying in depth from six inches to 
one foot. But I have a good red clay sub-soil, which enables the soil 
to retain the fertilizers applied to it, thus rendering it susceptible of 
permanent enriching. 

Three years since, when my attention w^as ilrst directed to Alfalfa, 
I sought the advice of the editor of the Journal of Progress, Professor 
Stelle, who informed me that, after attempting for several years to 
cultivate it, he had desisted. He stated that the plant, at Citronelle, 
in this county, died out every summer, not being able to withstand 
the hot suns of our climate. Discouraged but not dismayed, I deter- 
mined to test the matter on a small scale at first. Having procured 
some seed in March, 1876, I planted them on a border in my garden^ 
and gave neither manure nor work that season. The early summer 
here that year w^as very dry ; there was no rain whatever from the 
first of June to the 23d of July, and from the 2d of August to the 15th of 
November not a drop of rain fell on my place. Yet, during all this 
time, my Alfalfa remained fresh, bloomed, and was cut two or three 
times. On the 1st of November I dug some of it to examine the habit 
of root-growth, and to my astonishment found it necessary to go 22 
inches below the surface to reach anything like the end of the top 
roots. At once it was apparent that the plant was, by its very habit 
of growth, adapted to hot and dry climates. It is indeed a "child of 
the sun." 

Encouraged by this experiment, in which I purposely refrained from 
giving the Alfalfa any cai-e beyond cutting it occasionally, last year^ 
I proceeded on a larger scale, planting both spring and fall, as I have 
done again this year to ascertain the best season for putting in the 
seed. My experience teaches that there is no preference to be given to 
spring sowings over those of autumn, 2^^^ov'ided only, there be enough 
moisture in the soil to make the seed germinate, which they do .more 
quickly and more surely than the best turnips. Two winters have 
proved to me that the Alfalfa remains green throughout the winter in 
this latitude, 25 miles North of Mobile, and at an altitude of 400 feet 
above tide-water. Therefore I should prefer fall sowing which will 
give the first cutting from the first of March to the 1st of April follow- 
ing. This season my first cutting was made on the 1st of April ; and 
I have cut it since regularly every four or six weeks, according to the 
weather, to cure for hay. Meanwhile a portion has been cut almost 



For the Southern States. 137 



daily for fo3din,q- green, or soiling. Used in the latter way (for under 
no circumstances must it ever-be pastured), I am able to give my stock 
fresh, green food, fully four weeks before the native wild grasses com- 
mence to put out. I deem it best to cut the day before, what is fed 
green, in order to let it become thoroughly wilted before using. After 
a large number of experiments with horses, mules, cattle and swine, I 
can aver that in no instance, from March to November, have I found 
a case when any of these animals would not give the prefercnre to Al- 
falfa over every kind of grass (also soiled) known in this region. And, 
while Alfalfa makes a sweet and nutritious hay eagerly eaten by all 
kinds of st03k, it is as a forage plant for soiling, which is available for 
at least nine months in the year, that I esteem it so highly. The hay 
is easily cured, if that which is cut in the forenoon is thrown into small 
cocks at noon, then spread out after the dew is off next morning- 
sunned for an hour, and at once hauled into the barn. By this method 
the leaves do not fall off, which is sure to be the case, if the Alfalfa is 
exposed to a day or two of hot sunshine. 

It has been my habit to precede the Alfalfa, with a clean crop — 
usually Rutabagas, after which I sow clay peas, to be turned in about 
the last of July. About the middle of September or later I have the 
land plowed, the turn-plow being followed by a deep sub-soil plow or 
scooter. After this the land is fertilized and harrowed until it is thor- 
oughly pulverized and all lumps broken up. The fertilizers employed 
by me are 500 lbs, fine bone-dust (phosphate of lime) and 1000 lbs. cot- 
ton seed hull ashes per acre. These ashes are very rich in potash 
and phosphates, containing nearly 45 percent, of the phosphate of lime 
— the two articles best adapted to the wants of this plant. I sow all 
my Alfalfa with the Matthews' Seed Drill, in row^s 10 inches apart. 
Broad-cast would be preferable, if the land was perfectly free from 
grass and weeds ; but, as it takes several years of clean culture to put 
the land in this condition, sowing in drills is practically the best. No 
seed sower known to me can be compared with the Matthews' 3(?ed 
Drill. Its work is evenly and regularly done, and with a rapidity 
that is astonishing; for it opens the drill to any desired depth, drops 
the seed, covers and rolls them, and marks the line for the next drill 
at one operation. It is simple-and durable in its structure, and is the 
greatest labor-saving machine of its kind over devised for hand-work. 

When my Alfalfa is about three inches high, I work it with the Mat- 
thews' Hand Cultivator. First, the front tooth of the cultivator is 
taken out, by which means the row is straddled and all the grass cut 
out close to the plant ; then the front tooth being replaced, the culti- 
vator is passed betw-een the rows, completely cleaning the middles of 
all foul growth. As often as reiiuired to keep down grass, until the 
Alfalfa is large enough to cut, the Matthews' Hand (^ultivator is 
passed between the rows. 

Alfalfa requires three years to roach perfection, but even the first 
year the yield is larger than most forage plants, and after the second 
it is enormous. The land must, however, be made rich at first; atop- 
dressing every three years is all that will thereafter be required. The 
seed must be very lightly covered, and should be rolled, or brushed 
in, if not sowed with a Matthews' Seed Sower. 



138 Richard Frotsoher's Almanac and Garden Manual 



Whenever the plant is ill bloom it must be cut; for, if the seed be 
left to mature, the stems become hard and woody. Also, whenever it 
turns yellow, no matter at what age, it must be cut or mowed; for the 
yellow color shows the presence of some disease, or the work of some 
small insect, both of which seems to be remedied by mowing promptly. 
My experience leads me to the conclusion that fully five tons of cured 
hay per acre may be counted on if proper attention be given to deep 
plowing, subsoiling, fertilizing and cleanliness of the soil. These 
things are indispensable, and without them no one need attempt to 
cultivate Alfalfa. 

In conclusion, I will remark that I have tried the Lucerne see.d im- 
l^orted by you from France, side by side with the Alfalfa seed sent me 
by Trumbull & Co., of San Francisco, and I cannot see the slightest 
difference in appearance, character, quantity or quality of yield, or 
hardiness. They are identical ; both have germinated equally well, 
that is to say, perfectly. 

In closing, I cannot do better than refer you to the little treatise of 
Mr. C. W. Howard, entitled: "A Manual of the Cultivation of the 
Grasses and Forage Plants at the South.'" Mr. Howard, among th€ 
very first to cultivate Lucerne in the South, gives it the preference 
over all other forage plants whatever. My experience confirms all 
that Mr. Howard claims for it. Certainly, a plant that lasts a genera- 
tion is worthy of the bestowal of some time, patience and money to 
realize what a treasure they can secure for themselves. I confidently 
believe that in ten years from this date the Alfalfa will be generally 
cultivated throughout the entire South. 

I am, respectfully yours, 

E. M. HUDSON, 

Counsellor at Laic, 

20 Carondelet Street, 

New Orleans. 
^ »» 

CHUFA. 

The following remarks on Chufa are taken from a letter written by 
N. Stansbury, Esq., to the Louisiana Sugar Bowl. By my own ex- 
perience I can indorse all what is said, and recommend to those wh<> 
have not planted the " Chufa," to give it a trial. It is the best feed to 
fatten hogs. 

They can be planted from March to June. They will yield from 
125 to 150 bbls. per acre, with good cultivation. They are very produc- 
tive and the best feed to fatten hogs. One bbl. will put as much fat on 
the ribs of a hog as two of corn. The nut has a fine flavor, nearly equal 
to the pecan. 

They should be planted in rows two feet apart, and from 10 to 12 
inches in the row. When planted this way beds should be used and a 
deep water furrow left at a distance of twelve or fifteen feet. The betier 
plan would be to plant three feet apart and ten inches in the drill, as 
this would afford a water furrow and not materially lessen the yield. 
The nuts to be reserved for seed or other purposes should be gathered 
before November, or in advance of frost, as the top then dies and the 
nuts will not come up with the spires. 



For the Southern States. 



139 



All the nuts not needed for seed will remain perfectly sound in the 
ground from September until April, where the hogs can eat at will. 
The nut sends up a single spire so much like coco, it might deceive 
even an experienced eye at its first appearance. Around this spire a 
multitude of others form rapidly. At the foot of each spire is the nut, 
never more than two inches in the ground, and seldom a half inch. 
The cluster of spires will eq.ual in diameter the head of a flour barrel. 
As the whole surface of the ground will be nearly covered by nuts, one 
may form some idea of the yield. To lift them up, you have only to 
gather all the spires as a lady does her hair when combing it, and a 
slight pull will bring the entire cluster up with nine-tenths of the nuts 
attached. As very little dirt adheres to the roots, the nuts can be 
threshed off quite easily and raindly. A boy of twelve or fifteen years, 
with two or three small children, could gatiier and thresh out four or 
five barrels daily. Unlike the coco, the chufa will die out in two or 
three years, if neglected or suffered to be choked with weeds or grass. 

Price per Qt., 20c. Per Gall., 6i)c. Per Bushel, $iMd 

LE CONTE PEAR. 

I am prepared to furnish cuttings of this new pear, which origin- 
ated in Georgia, and is a hybrid between the "China Sand" and one of 
the finer cultivated varieties. It is propagated with remarkable ease 
from cuttings, which make a growth of ftom 6 to 9 feet the first sea- 
son. The fourth year from setting the cuttings the trees should com- 
mence to bear. Propagation by cuttings is considered the best method. 

This new Southern pear is as vigorous in growth as the China 
Sand, and is an enormous bearer. The fruit is large, pale yellow, 
juicy melting, and of good quality, doing better in the South than else- 
where. It bears transportation well, and commands the highest prices 
at the North. Time of ripening begins about the middle of July. So 
far, this pear has never been known to blight. It promises to be the 
pear for the South. 

Price, $1.50 per hundred, by Express or freight. Postage extra by 
mail. 

Eooted one year old trees, 25c. each, $2.50 per dozen. 

All choice varieties of nursery stock can be obtained and furnished 
at reasonable rates on application. 



SUCKER STATE STRAWBERRY. 

We have various sorts of soil in Louisiana, and the Strawberry 
suitable to and succeeding equally well in poor or rich land, can 
onlv be determined bv practicil ex])oriment. 

There are but few varieties which adapt themselves to all soils and 
latitudes, hence the importance of planting those which experienced 
fruit growers have tested and found profitable. A Strawberry having 
all the good qualities, has not, and perhaps never will be discovered ; 
still in choosing, it is well to jnirchase i)lants having as many good 
points as possible. This I claim for the Sucker State. 

It is bisexual; having both, stamens and pistils perfect. The 
foliage is very heavy, protecting the fruit from beating rains and hot 
sun." It is verv prolific, large size, good quality, and cone shaped. 
Color bright red, very attractive, and in addition will ship well. I offer 
a limitednumber of this variety, at the following prices; 

75c. per 100, $5.00 per 1000. 



140 Richard Frotscher's Almanaa and. Garden Manual 



CELESTE OR CELESTIAL FIG. 

I have for sale about two thousand , two year old trees of this variety. 
They have been raised from cuttings in a sandy loam ; are well rooted, 
and raised to a single stem ; not in a number of sprouts, as is often the 
case, when raised from suckers taken off from old trees. 

The cultivation of this fruit has rather been negleated, which should 
not be so, as the fig is always a sure crop, with very little attention. 
It has commenced to be an article of commerce, when preserved ; 
shipped from here it sells quite readily North, put up in that way. The 
above variety is the best for that purpose, not liable to sour like the 
yellow skinned varieties, and sweeter than other dark skinned kinds. 

Price, 25c. each ; $3.00 per doz. ; $20.00 per hundred; packed and 
delivered on steamboat, or E. E. depot. 



SOME VARIETIES OF THE SORGHUM FAMILY NOT 
MENTIONED BEFORE. 

As a forage plant for early cutting, to be fed to stock, I do not think 
that anything is equal to the Amber Sorghum, such as I have been 
selling for years, imported from Kansas. After several cuttings, 
the branching varieties of Sorghum, also called Millo Maize, may be 
preferable, but more so for seed than forage. — The Teosinte will give 
more fodder than any of the Sorghums. Some varieties not before des- 
cribed and rather new here are the following : 

Yellow Millo Maize, or Yellow Branching Dhoura, grows same as 
the White Branching kind. The only difference exists in the size of 
the seed, which is twice the size of the white variety.— It is said to be 
somewhat earlier, seeds planted in April will ripen seed in July. — 
On account of its branching habit this grain should be planted in four 
or five foot rows, and two to three feet in the drill, according to the 
strength of the land, two plants in a hill. The cultivation is like corn. 

Price, 2oc. per lb; postage extra, 16c. per lb. by mail— 10 lbs. $2.00 
by Express or Steamer. 

KAFFIR CORN. 

This grain was distributed in small quantities from the Georgia 
State Department of Agriculture in 1878, and in the hands of Dr. J. II. 
Watkins, of Palmetto, Campbell County, Ga., it has been preserved, 
and fully developed, and was first brought to public notice through 
him in 1885. The seed offered for sale is from his own growing, the 
genuine and pure stock crop of 1886. 

It is a variety of Sorghum, non Saccharine, and distinctly differing 
in habit of growth and other charav?teristics from all others of that 
class. The plant is low, stocks perfectly erect, the foliage is wide, 
alternating closely on either side the stalks. It does not stool from 
the root, but branches from the top joints, producing from two to four 
heads of Grain from each stalk. The heads are long, narrow, and 
derfectly erect, well filled with white grain, which at maturity is 
slightly flecked with red or reddish brown spots. Weight 60 lbs. per 
bushel. 



For the Southern States. 



141 



The avortige height of growth on good strong land, is 5A to 6 feet ; 
on thin hind, 4i to 5 feet. The stalk is stout, never blown about by 
winds, never tangles, and is always manageable, easily handled. A 
boy can gather the grain heads or the fodder. The seed heads grow 
from 10 to 12 inches in length, and product of grain on good land easily 
reaches 5U to 6o bushels per acre. 

It has the quality common to many Sorghums of resisting drought. 
If the growth is checked by want of moisture, the plant waits for rain, 
and then at once resumes its processes, and in the most disastrous 
seasons has not failed so far to make its crop. On very thin and 
worn lands, it yields paying crops of grain and forage, even in dry 
seasons in which corn has utterly failed, on the same lands. 

The Avhole stalk, as well as the blades, cures into excellent fodder, 
and in all stages of its growth is available for green feed, cattle, 
mules and horses being equally fond of it, and its quality not sur- 
passed by any other known variety. If cut down to the ground, two 
or more shoots spring from the root, and the growth is thus main- 
tained until checked by frost. 

The Kaffir Corn may be planted in the latter part of March, or 
early in April. It bears earlier planting than other Millets or Sor- 
ghums. It should be put in rows not over three feet apart, even on 
best land, and it bears thicker planting than any other variety of 
Sorghum ; should be massed in the drill on good land, for either grain 
or forage purposes, and also on thin land, if forage mainly is desired. 
No plant can equal it for quality and quantity of grain and forage on 
thin lands. Use 3 to 5 lbs. of seed ]jer acre. Price of seed, 50c. per lb ; 
lots of 10 lbs, for $4.00 ; 15 lbs. for '¥5.00, by mail, post paid 65c. per lb ; 
i lb., 20c. 

TEOSINTE. 

(Reanaluxurians.) 
This is a forage plantfromCentral America. It resembles Indian Corn 
in aspect and vegetation, but produces a great number of shoots 3 to 4 
yards high ; it is perennial, but only in such situations where the 
thermometer does not fall below freezing point. Cultivated as an 
annual, it will yield a most abundant crop of excellent green fodder. 

Considering the Teosinte a superior forage plant, the following- 
extract of a letter from Mr. Chas. Debremond of Thibodeaux, La., 
will give additional light on the cultivation of same :— In describing 
his experience with Teosinte, he advises ]:)lanting the seed in 
February, so as to have the plants up early in March, as it takes some 
14 or 20 days for the seed to germinate. He prefers planting in rows, 
as giving a heavier crop than when in hills ; and, as its growth during 
the first month is very slow, he gives it a good hoeing for its first cul- 
tivation, using only the t)lough thereafter. 

He also advises cutting the stalks for green food when about 4 
feet high, and specially recommends cutting them close to the ground, 
as tending to make a much heavier second growth than when cut 
higher, His horses, mules and cattle eat the stalks with great avidity, 
leaving no part unconsuraed, and prefer it much to green Indian Coin 
or Sorghum. 

Price, $^1.75 per lb. ; 50c. per \ lb. ; 20c. per oz. Postage prej)aid. 



142 



Richard Frotscher's Almanac and^Garden Manual 



NOVELTIES FOR 1887, 

AND SOME VARIETIES OF SEED OF SPECIAL MERIT. 

Cleveland's Alaska Poa. This is au extra early Pea, blue 
in color, described by the originator as the earliest, the purest, the 
most prolific, the best in tlavor of all the early family of Peas. 

■ r 




It is by testiDionials from reliable parties earlier than the First and 
Best, and Eural New Yorker. From all who tried this kind it is highly 
recom mended for all the qualities as stated aboye. 

Price, $6.00 per bushel ; SI. 00 per gall.; 40c. per quart; •20c. per 
pint ; 10c. per packet ; to the quart has to be added 30c. postage ; to the 
pint, 15c. ; the packet of 10c. yvill be sent postage paid, containing a 
good i pint. Testimonials as to the merits of this Pea will be mailed 
on a]~)])lication. 



For the Southern States. 



143 



Carter's Stratagem Pea. This is a new wrinkled vaiiety from 
'England. It has been tested here and pronounced very productive, 
and the finest late variety ever brought into cultivation. The pods arc 
from 4 to Si inches long; the vines will grow about two feet high and 
need no support, growing very strongly. 

Price, 40c. per quart ; 25c. per pint ; 10c. per packet. 30c. postage 
has to be added to the quart, 15c. to the pint ; packets of 10 cts., postage 
prepaid. 





Carter's Stratagem Pea 



Carter's Telephone Pea. 



Carter's Telephone Pea. A new wrinkled English late variety ; 
grows about 4| to 5 feet high. The pods are very long containing from 
8 to 12 fine flavored Peas. It is very productive ; will bear twice as 
much as the Champion of England which is about of the same season. 

Price, 30c. per quart ; 20c. per pint ; 10c. per packet ; in regard to 
postage, same as stated for the other varieties. 

L.azy 'Wife's Pole Bean. This is a new Pole Bean introduced a 
few years ago in Pennsylvania from Bucks County of that State. The 



144 



Bichard FrotHcher^s Almanac and Garden Manual 



pods are entirely stiingless, 4 to 5 inches long, and have a very fine 
flavor when cooked. They retain their rich flavor until nearly ripe. 
The Beans are white, and fine as a shell bean 

Price, 40c. per quart; 20c. per i)int, 10c. per packet; in regard to 
postage, same as foregoing kinds. 

OoldoiB Wax Pole Bi^an. This is of German origin, and is the 
earliest of all Wax Pole Beans ; the pods are long, and of excellent 
quality. It is not a strong grower, but bears abundantly for the 
amount of vines it makes. 

Price, 40c. per quart ; 23C. per pint ; 10c. per packet. If ordered 
by mail, 30c. per quart and 15c. per pint postage has to be added ; 10c. 
packet, prepaid by mail. 

New Oolden l¥ax Flag^eolet Pole Bean. This is also a 
new Wax Pole Bean from Germany; it is the best of all Wax Pole 
Beans in cultivation ; surpasses in size, and delicacy of flavor all othei- 
Wax varieties. It is a very strong grower and bears for a longtime 
abundantly. It is entirely stringless and does not spot, even by rain 
or other untoward weather. 

Price, 75c. per quart; 40c. per pint; 10c. per packet. If ordered by 
mail, 30c. per quart, and 15c. per iiint, postage has to be added, ICc. 
packet, postage prepaid. 




Lazy Wife's Pole Beans. 



For the Southern States. 



145 



IVardwell's New Dwarf Kidney Wax Beaoi. Tliis is a 
new Dwarf Wax Bean, offered for the first time. I have tested same 
for two years, and consider it tlie best Dwarf Wax Bean in cultivation. 
It is quite early ; the pods are of similar shape as the Golden Wax, 
but longer, color of a lisht golden yellow. They are very prolific ami 
hardy, surpassing any other Dwarf Wax Bean I know of. In the two 
years, that I have tried this sort, it never spotted. The color of the 
bean is somewhat like the Golden Wax, the former being rather larger 
and less spotted than that variety. ~I recommend same highly. 

Price, 50c. per quart ; 30c. per pint ; 10c. per packet. If ordered by 
mail, 30c. per quart, 15c. per i)int, postage has to be added ; 10c. packet, 
postage prepaid. 

Southern Tfillow- leaved, Sewee or Butter Bean. This 
Bean has originated about New Orleans, where it is cultivated by th<> 
Market gardeners; in fact when it can be had it is the only kind 
planted. Large Lima Beans do not b(^ar well here, neither are they 
salable in the market as well as smaller varieties. The beans when 





New GoMen Wax Flageolet Pole Bean. 
10 



l-loriUa''- Fa\ont 



146 



Fiichard FirjiscJcerf Almanac and Garden Manual 



shelied are of the size of the CaroliEa or Sewee Bean. The leaves are 
quite distinct. beiEg r arrow and long like willow leaves. Stock very 
limited. Only in packets at l^c. each. 

Florida's FaTorile Water ?Ieloii. This Melon originated 
with W. M. Girarr:ean. oi I\J onticeJio. Florida. It is offered forthetirst 
time, and is described by the origirator. as very proline, two weeks 
earlier than Kolb Gem." Eattlesnake, or Fride'of Georgia, and the 
finest table melon ever grown. Is of medium size, colored with light 
and dark green stripes alternately; flesh deep red, deliciously sweet, 
very firm and crisp. 

"Price. >1.7o per lb. : i lb. 50c. ; per packet. Inc. 

Oemler's Triuiupli Water 
?Ieloii. This new and valuable 
Melon oricrinated on the borders of 
the Black S^a. in Pvussia. The 
seeds are so diminutive that a Xo. 6 
thimble will hold 55 of them. where- 
as it holds only 7 of those of our 
ordinary watermelon seeds, hence 
rhey can be swallowed without in- 
convenience. It is very early and 
very productive. In sliape it is a 
short oval, weighing about 15 lbs., 
more or less. The color is a dark 
mottled green, and that of the flesh 
a dark red with an edginsr of orange 
yellow. It has no light colored 
or tasteless core. Its flavor is very 
sweet. 
Price, per packet of 25 seeds, -ioc. 




Oemlers Triumpn w ater Melon. 



LOUISIANA SOFT SHELL PECANS. 

This is a variety of nuts which only grows South, and is a sure 
crop here. Those who planted Orange trees twenty years ago. lost 
most of th^ir labor last January, when seven-eighths of trees were 
killed by the severity of the weather. If Pecan trees had been planted 
instead, "they would have brous-ht a handsome incoru.e, and continued 
to increase every year in their production, furnishing a never failing 
crop for a whole'century. 

What I offer is of choice quality. 

Price, 75c. per lb. : 10 lbs. for S6.00; if ordered by mail, 16c. per lb. 
for postage must be added. 



EXTRA CLEANED BIRD SEED. 

I make a specialty to put up choice re-cleaned birdseed in cartoons 
holding one pound. These cartoons contain a mixture of 

SICILY CANARY, 
HEMP. 

GERMAN RAPE. 

AND GERMAN MILLET, 

all re-cleaned and of best quality. 

Have also plain canary r-ut up in same way, one pound cartoons ; 
this is of the very best quality and also re-cleaned. 

Price, 10c. per cartoon ; 3 cartoons, 25c. 

Have also in bulk, the above as well as Hemp and Fiape 

Cuttle Fish Bone. 5c. a piece ; 50c. a pound. 



For the Southern States. 



147 



PLANTERS' AND GARDENERS' PRICE LIST. 



Cost of Mailing Seeds. Orders for ouaces and ten cent papers are 
mailed free of postage, except Beans, Peas and Corn. See page 4 in 
regard to seeds by mail. On orders by the pound and quart an ad- 
vance of sixteen cents per pound and thirty cents per quart must 
be added to quotations for postag^e. 

artichoke:. peroz. per lb. 

Large Green Globe (Loan) $0 50 $6 00 

Early Campania 50 6 00 

ASPARAGUS. 

Large Purple Top 10 1 00 

BEA]\S, (Dwarf, Snap or Bush). per quart. per gal. 

Extra Early Six Weeks or Newington Wonder. . ^0 20 a^ SO 60 

Early Red Speckled Valentine 20 r 60 

Early Mohawk Six Weeks 20 '■§ 60 

Early Yellow Six Weeks 20 | 60 

Dwarf German Wax, (stringless) 20 ^ 60 

White Kidney 20 ^^ 50 

Red Speckled French 20 ^ 60 

Early China Red Eye 20 'f 60 

Red Kidney 20 =2 50 

Dwarf Golden Wax 25 g 80 

Best of All 30 .> 100 

Improved Valentine 25 ^ 75 

BEAIVS, (Pole or Running)— o 

Large Lima 40 "^ 1 50 

Carolina or Sewee 40 o 1 50 

Horticultural or Wren's Egg 30 2, i 00 

Dutch Case Knife 30 -^ 1 00 

German Wax, (stringless) 40 "S 1 50 

Southern Prolific 40 ^ 1 50 

Crease Back, .... 40 1 50 

BEA1\S, (English)— 

Broad Windsor 25 75 

BEET. per oz. per lb. 

Extra Early or Bassano $0 10 *0 50 

Simon's Early Red Turnip. ........ — 10 50 

Early Blood Turnip 10 50 

Long Blood 10 40 

Half Long Blood 10 50 

Egyptian Red Turnip 10 50 

Long Red Mangel Wuizel 10 40 

White French or Sugar.. 10 40 

Silver or Swiss Chard 10 75 

BORECOLE, or CURLED KALE. 

Dwarf German Greens 15 1 00 

BROCCOLI. Purple Cape 25 3 00 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS 25 3 00 



118 Pdchard Frotschers Almanac and Garden Manual 



cabbage:. peroz. per lb. 

Early York SO 25 

Early Large York .... 25 

Early Sugar Loaf 25 

Early Large Oxheart , 25 

Early WiDningstadt 25 

Jersey TTakefield 30 

Early Flat Dutch 25 

Large Flat Brunswick. . - 25 

ImproYed Large Late DruDihead 25 

Superior Large Late Flat Dutch 25 

Improved Early Summer 25 

Eed Dutch (for pickling) 25 

Green Globe Savoy 25 

Early Dwarf Savoy 25 

Drumhead Savoy 25 

St. Denis or Chou Bonneuil 25 

Excelsior 25 

CAILIFLOT^ER. 

Extra Early Paris 75 

Half Early Paris 75 

Large Asiatic 75 

Early Erfurt 75 

LeXormand"s Short Stemmed 75 

Early Italian Giant 1 00 

Imperial 1 00 

Late Italian Giant 1 00 

Algiers (fine) 75 

CARROTS. 

Early Scarlet Horn lu , 

Half Long Scarlet French. 10 

Half Long Luc. . 10 

Improved Long Orange 10 

Long Eed, without core. 10 

St. Valerie 10 

Danver's Intermediate 10 

CELERY. 

Large White Solid (finest American) 30 

Large Eibbed Dwarf 25 

Turnip-Eooted 30 

Cutting 15 

CHERVIE. 

Plain leaved 15 

COLLARDS 20 

CORA' SALAD 15 

CORA'. per quart. 

Extra Early Dwarf Sugar $0 25 

Adam 's Extra Early 20 

Early Sugar or Sweet 20 

StowelPs Evergreen Sugar 20 

Golden Beauty 15 

Champion White Pearl 15 



S2 00 


2 00 


2 50 


2 50 


2 50 


4 00 


2 50 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 50 


2 50 


3 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


12 00 


12 00 


12 00 


10 00 


1 00 


80 


' 1 00 


80 


1 00 


1 00 


80 


4 00 


3 00 


4 00 


1 50 


1 50 


'- 2.00 


1 50 


per gal. 


to 60 


50 


60 


60 


50 


50 



For the Southern States. 



149 



CORN,— Continued. X^er quart. 

Golden Dent Gourd Seed $0 15 

Early Yellow Canada 15 

Large WJiite Flint 15 

Blunt's Prolitic, Field 15 

Improved Learning 15 

Mosby's Prolific 15 

CRESS. per^.z. 

Curled or Pepper Grass SO 10 

Broad-leaved. ... 15 

CUCUMBER. 

Improved Early White Spine 10 



Early Frame 

Long Green Turkey 

Early Cluster 

Gherkin, or Burr (for pickling). . 

Long Green White Spine 

EGGPI.AIVT. 

Large Purple, or New Orleans Market 

Early Dwarf Oval 40 

EJ\DIVE. 

Green Curled 

Extra Fine Curled 

Broadleaved, or Escarolle 

KOHLRABI. 

Early W^hite Vienna 

EEEK. 

Large London Flag 

Large Carentan. . . 

EETTUCE. 

Early Cabbage, or White Butter 

Improved Royal Cabbage 

Brown Dutch 

Drumhead Cabbage 

White Paris Coss 

Perpignan 

Improved Large Passion 

MELOJ^^, MUSK or CAMTELOUPE. 

Netted Nutmeg 

Netted Citron 

Pine Apple. ... 

Early White Japan. . 

Persian or Cassaba 

New Orleans Market. .... 

MEEOI^, IVATER, 

Mountain Sweet 10 

Mountain Si)rout 10 

Improved Gipsey 10 

Ice Cream (White seeded) 10 

Orange 15 



50 



20 

20 
20 

25 

25 

30 

20 
20 
20 
15 
20 
2'J 
20 

10 
10 
10 
10 
15 
15 



per gal. 

SO 50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

per lb. 

$1 00 

2 00 

80 

80 

1 00 

80 

3 00 

1 50 

00 
5 00 

2 00 
2 50 

2 50 

3 00 

2 50 

4 00 

2 00 
2 50 
2 50 
2 00 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 

1 00 
1 00 
1 CO 
1 25 
1 25 
1 50 

80 

80 

1 00 
1 00 
1 50 



150 Richard Frotscher's Almanac and Garden Manual 

MEJLON, WATER.— Continued. per oz. per lb. 

Eattlesnake (true).. $0 10 $100 

Cuban Queen 10 100 

Pride of Georgia 10 1 50 

Mammoth Iron-Clad 10 1 00 

Kolb Gem 1"> 125 

MUSTARD. 

Large Curled 10 75 

Chinese 10 1 00 

Large-leaved . 10 75 

White or Yellow Seeded .■ ... 10 40 

NASTURTIUM. 

Tall 25 3 00 

Dwarf ... 25 4 00 

OKRA. 

Green Tall Growing 10 60 

Dwarf White. . 10 75 

White Velvet. .... 10 1 00 

ONION. 

Large Red Wethersfield 25 3 00 

White, or Silver Skin 23 4 00 

Creole 29 2 50 

ITALIAN ONION. 

New Queen , 30 4 00 

SHALLOTS. Market price. 

PARSLEY. 

Plain Leaved 10 75 

Double Curled 10 1 00 

Improved Garnishing 15 1 50 

PARSNIP. 

Hollow Crown, or Sugar. 10 60 

PEAS. per quart, a per gal. 

Extra Early, (First and Best) $0 25 -2 |o 75 

Tom Thumb 25 | 75 

Early Washington 20 ^ 60 

Laxton's Alpha 25 ^ 1 00 

Bishop's Dwarf Long Pod 20 ° GO 

Champion of England 25 S 1 00 

McLean's Advancer 25' 'So 1 00 

McLean's Little Gem 25 S 80 

Laxton's Prolific Long Pod 25 3 100 

Eugenie 25 i 100 

Dwarf Blue Imperial 25 ^ 80 

Eoval Dwarf Marrow 20 « 60 

CJD 

Black-Eyed Marrowfat 15 ^ 50 

Large White Marrowfat 20 Z 50 

Dwarf Sugar 50 '"^ 2 00 

Tall Sugar 50 t 2 00 

American W^onder 30 p^ 1 25 

Field or Cow Peas Market price. 



per lb. 


$4 00 


5 00 


4 00 


4 00 


5 00 



For the Southern States. 151 



PEPPER. per oz. 

Bell or Bull Nose $0 40 

Sweet Spanish Monstrous 40 

Long Red Cayenne . . lO 

Bed Cherry 40 

Golden Dawn Mango, (new) 40 

Bird Eye ...... 50 

Tabasco or Chili 50 

Ruby King 40 5.00 

POTATOES. 

Early Rose ^ 

Breezes' Peerless j Prices vary according 

Russets / to market. 

Extra Early Vermont , I Qnotations will be 

Snowflake i given on applica- 

Beauty of Hebron i ^j^^^ 

White Elephant ; 

POTATOES, SITEET. 

Yam ) Prices vary according to market. 

Shanghai, or California Yam. f Quotations given on application. 

PUmPKIN. per quart. 

Kentucky Field $0 25 

per oz. 

Large Cheese . $0 10 

Cashaw Crook-Neck (striped) 10 

Golden Yellow Mammoth 20 

RADISH. 

Early Long Scarlet 10 

Early Scarlet Turnip 10 

Yellow Summer Turnip 10 

Early Scarlet Olive Shaped 10 

White Summer Turnip.. . . 10 

Scarlet Half Long French 10 

Scarlet Oliveshaped, or French Breakfast 10 

Black Spanish (Winter.). . 10 

Chinese Rose (Winter.). 10 

ROQUETTE 15 

SAESIFY (American) 20 

SORRE L, (Broad-leaved) 15 

SPIIVACH. 

Extra Large-leaved Savoy. 10 

Broad-leaved Flanders 10 

SCtUASH. 

Early Bash, or Patty Pan 10 

Long Green, or Summer Crook-Neck 10 

London Vegetable Marrow ... 15 

The Hubbard. 15 

Boston Marrow. 15 



per gal. 


SI 00 


per lb. 


$0 60 


75 


2 00 


50 


60 


80 


50 


80 


50 


60 


75 


1 00 


2 0(1 


2 00 


1 50 


40 


40 


75 


1 00 


1 50 


1 25 


1 50 



152 Eichard FroUcher's Almanac and Garden Manual i 


TOMATO. per oz. 




per lb. t 


Extra Early Dwarf Eed. . . $u 25 




$4 00 


Early Large Smooth Eed. . . . . u 20 




2 00 


Tilden ... 25 




2 50 


Trophy, (selected), 40 




4 00 


Large Yellow.. .. 30 






4 00 
3 00 


Acme 25 


Paragon . 25 




3 00 


■ Livingston's PerfectioD 25 




3 00 


Livingston's Favorite. .. 25 




3 00 


Livingston's Beauty 30 




4 00 


TLRMP. 






Early Eed or Purple Top (strapleaved) 10 




50 


Early White Flat Dutch i strapleaved' 10 




50 


Large White Globe . ...... . .0 10 




50 


White Spring . ... o lo 




50 


Yellow A berdeen. 10 




50 


Golden Ball lO 




50 


Purple Top Euta Baga . . . • OK) 




50 


Munich. Earlv Purple Top o lo 




60 


Extra Earl V Purple Top ....0 10 




50 


Purple Top Globe 10 




50 


Improved Euta Baga . o 10 




50 


i SIVEET A]\D3IE1>I€I]\AI. HERBS. per package. |l 


Anise . . .. . . . 




St) 10 


Balm. 




10 


Basil 




10 


Bene 




10 


Borage 


V 


10 


Caraway 




10 


Dill. 




10 


Fennel 




10 


Lavender 




10 


Majoram . 




10 


Pot 3Iarigold 




10 


Eosemary 




10 


Eue. 




10 


Sage .... 




10 


Summer Savory 




10 


Thvme 




10 


Wormwood 




10 


GRASS a:nd field seeds. 






Eed Clover , 






White Dutch Clover \ 






Alsike Clover. .... . \ 






\lfalfa, or French Lucerne ... . . . 




a 




Kentucky Blue Grass 


Eescue Grass. - . - i 




•- 




Hungarian Grass . c . 


n 




German Millet u S-^ 


•^ 




Eed Top Grass f e: 


:=r 




Eve 1 ^ 


zt 




Barley / t= 


-; 




• Eed or Bust Proof Oats | ^ 


^ 




Sorghum L '% 


C 




English Eve Grass n ^ 


c 




Broom Corn U 


■^ 




Buckwheat \ 




■^ 




Johnson Grass 




5 


i 


Tall Meadow Oat Grass 




'^^ 


1 


Meadow Fescue ' 




1 


Eussian Sunflower, 




1 


Orchard Grass 




! 


Prices of larger quantities of seed will be given on application. | 


Peas and Beans are very low, if ordered by the bushel. 







f 



Almanac 

Arliclioke 

Asparagus. ; 

Beans. (Ru-h) 

Beans, (Pole)... 

Beans, (Dwarf. Snap or Bu 
Beans, (Pole or Running). 
Beans, English. 


INDEX. 


i 
1 
1 

PAGE. 
50 

. . 136 to 138 
....50 to 52 


' PAGE. 

... 7 to 18 
.. 23 and 24 

24 

24 

25 

sh) 25 to 27 

27 to 29 

29 


Leek ■ 

Letter on "Alfalfa" 

Lettuce 


Matthews' Hand Cultivator. 

Melon, Musk 

Melon, Water 

Mustard . 

Nasturtium 


128 

... 52 and 53 
... 53 to 56 

57 

57 


Beets ...... ... 

Bird Seed, Extra Cleaned. . 

Borer'ole or Kale. 

Broccoli. 

Brussels Sprouts .... , 
Bulbous Roots 


. .. 29 to 31 

146 

31 

31 

31 

... 120 to 124 


New York Seed Drill .... 


127 


Novelties 

Okra 


. . 142 to 146 
...57 and 58 


Onion . . 


, ..58 to 60 


Parsley. /. 

Parsnip 


60 

60 


Bonqnet Papers 

Cabbage . . . 


125 and 126 
32 to 36 


Peas. 

Pecans, Louisiana soft shell 

Pepper 

Potatoes 

Pumpkin 

Price List, Plautei-s' and 
ers' 


61 to 63 * 

146 

... 63 to 65 

. .... 65 to 69 

... 69 and 70 

Garden- 
147 to 152 


Cauliflower 


36 to 39 


Carrot .... 

Celery 


...39 and 40 
40 to 42 


Celeste, or Celestial Fig. . . 

Chervil 

Chufa. 


140 

42 

138 


Price List Garden Implements . 132 to 135 

Radish. 70 to 72 

Remarks on Raising Vegetables for 

Shii)pins 5 and 6 i 


(yoUards. 


42 


Corn Salad 

Corn, Indian 

Corn, Koffir, 

Corn and Seed Planter . . 

Cress 

Cucumber 

Climbing Plants. 

Directions for Planting. 
Dhouro, or Egyptian Corn 

Eggplant . . -. 

Endive 


42 

. ... 42 to 46 
.140 and 141 

128 

. ... 46 and 47 
.. ..47 and 4.8 
.118 and 119 
... 91 to 98 
. . 137 to 139 
. . 48 and 49 

49 

... 99 to 124 


Roquette . . . 


72 


Salsify 

Seeds by Mail 

Shallots 

Sorghum, some varieties, . 
Sorrel 


72 

4 

60 

140 

73 


Sowing Seeds 

Spinach 

Squash 

Sucker State Strawberry, . 
Teosinte 


21 

72 

... 73 and 74 

139 

141 ' 


Flower Seeds 


Grass and Field Seeds 


83 to 90 


Garden Implements 

Herb Seeds 

Hot Bed 

Koffir Corn 

Kohlrabi 

Le Conte Pear 


. . 129 to 131 

82 

20 

. . 140 and 141 

50 

139 


Tomato 


. . .. 74 to 77 


Turnip. 


... 78 to 82 


Table showing Qaautity of 

quired to the Acre.. .' 

Vegetable Gardsn 


seed re- 

22 

19 



■%^^ 



,00) ^^0^^ 



iCgo^i 



-rf— ^EEq— f^ 



4'f 



15 & 17 DU MAINE ST, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



a^^rc.>> ctlT ^c 



:^ n I m 1 1 11 1 



cal-io.u> io f. €>. ^c^ox- 1996. 




Vegetable, Flower and Field 




^r **^p^ ^^rfi *^ 




vv!i'>: 






/O/c^/r: /c /r /r /r /O /r^/r /r^^ /- ^/r- /c 



Seed Potatoes & Cboice Seed Cora 



^^ SIPEOZ^^OLjT^ 



^^^:A> 



-^^^^^y-.^^^^^^. 



My Stock of Seeds is the largest in the South, to 
which I call the attention of all in want of fresh and 
reliable Seed. 

Orders respectfully solicited. All communications 
will meet with prompt attention. . ' 



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